#1
i was thinking about this in the car the other day....

my online band have done a few songs, originals and covers, but i think they sound a little too "in your face". i know reverb gives the illusion of "space" between the music and the listener, but where/when/how much do i add?

i double track my guitars. should i just add verb right from my amps? or would that muddy it up? should i record guitars dry and add the reverb in post? should i add a little more reverb onto the master track?

if it helps, we are musically kind of in the vein of breaking benjamin/stone sour....
#2
I never add reverb to rhythm guitars. And only add a little to lead guitars, I am not a big fan of 80s sounding guitars. I always add a little to vocals. Everything else it just depends. Reverb is different with every song. Adjust to what's needed.
#3
I go by my favorite recording when it comes to reverb: Metallica's Ride The Lightning.

Vocals seem to have been double tracked in a tile bathroom, possibly with a figure 8 mic to catch that room verb.

Reverb on the leads, probably from a room mic or two during tracking. That, or verb added post tracking.

Possibly a room mic on the drums as well. The kick is dry, the cymbals have their own natural verb, and the snare is kinda spacious. The toms are probably dry, it's hard for me to tell.

Make sure you don't brickwall your recordings and compress them to oblivion. That will kill dynamics and add to that IN YOUR FACE kinda sound. Don't boost any EQ in your mix til you've cut offending frequencies to make things start fitting in the mix right, then boost in small amounts where it's absolutely needed.

Try adding some verb where noted (vocals, lead guitars, maybe very LIGHT on the drums, but sidechain the kick out if it's too woofy) to provide some space and help things sit a little better in the mix.

Excessive high EQ can contribute to a harsh sounding mix, too. You might be mixing at too high of a volume, killing your high frequency sensitivity in your ear, then boosting to make up for it. Always mix at a lower volume to avoid this fatigue, and keep an eye on your highs. Maybe low-pass the guitars between 8-12k to cut some highs out of the mix and allow the cymbals to sit a bit better, etc.
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

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Last edited by Shinozoku at Oct 13, 2011,
#4
Reverb is one of those things you can be crazy creative with. There's definitely no "right" way to do it.

A few fun things to try:
- No reverb on something to make it stick way out of the mix and be all in your face. It works on more spacious tracks where one sound without verb almost sounds out of place.
- Lots of verb on just one big snare hit to make it sound almost like a gun shot.
- Put reverb on just the delay (a very short delay) of a track. That keeps the track up in your face while still letting that spaciness be heard.
- Long pre-delay. Gives it an odd sound similar to putting it on the delay.
- Reverse reverb. You hear this one all over the place. Great way to do a quick build into a big section of the song
- Putting a different sound's reverb behind a track. This only really works on more sparse tracks where you can clearly hear it. I heard this in a song once with a very smooth sounding staccato synth that had a very percussive sounding verb. Awesome effect.
- Put the reverb pre-fader and fade the track in/out.
- And lots and lots more. I'd be curious to see what other people have found. I love learning new fun tricks.

Have fun with it man. Experiment and don't be afraid to try some weird things.
#5
always process time-based effects as auxiliary tracks. if i use verb it's on snare and vox. I really prefer light delay though.
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#6
IMO, the best way to add reverb to your song is to create a return track (an empty track that just receives audio) with just one reverb effect. Then send all the other tracks to that return track. Your DAW should allow you to adjust the amount of SEND for each track. The main reason for doing this is so that your band sounds like you are all in one room together, it just sounds right. Having a different reverb on each track may make it seem as if your guitarist is in a giant auditorium and your vocalist is in a small box. The second reason for doing this is that the more you increase the wet signal of the reverb, the more you start to lose the original sound of the instrument. It sounds complex but it really isn't. Once you figure out how to do it in your DAW, it's going to sound a lot better and you'll actually be able to set it up faster than if you were to add reverb to every single track. There are many youtube videos on setting a send/return reverb track. That would be a good place to start.
#7
thanks for the input guys. i didnt think of the "different room" concept as described above, so that was really helpful. thanks again.
#8
Quote by lextexrex
IMO, the best way to add reverb to your song is to create a return track (an empty track that just receives audio) with just one reverb effect. Then send all the other tracks to that return track. Your DAW should allow you to adjust the amount of SEND for each track. The main reason for doing this is so that your band sounds like you are all in one room together, it just sounds right. Having a different reverb on each track may make it seem as if your guitarist is in a giant auditorium and your vocalist is in a small box. The second reason for doing this is that the more you increase the wet signal of the reverb, the more you start to lose the original sound of the instrument. It sounds complex but it really isn't. Once you figure out how to do it in your DAW, it's going to sound a lot better and you'll actually be able to set it up faster than if you were to add reverb to every single track. There are many youtube videos on setting a send/return reverb track. That would be a good place to start.


this is exactly what i was going to recomend. i set the aux track at 100% wet on the 'verb so that it only has the reverb and none of the attack. leave the main tracks to keep the main sound, and the aux track to add the depth and reverb.
#9
^^ Yep, that's the best way to set it up in your DAW, then juse use your ears to decide how much should be on each instrument.
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#10
Quote by westley23j
i was thinking about this in the car the other day....

my online band have done a few songs, originals and covers, but i think they sound a little too "in your face". i know reverb gives the illusion of "space" between the music and the listener, but where/when/how much do i add?

i double track my guitars. should i just add verb right from my amps? or would that muddy it up? should i record guitars dry and add the reverb in post? should i add a little more reverb onto the master track?

if it helps, we are musically kind of in the vein of breaking benjamin/stone sour....

Have you got a sample we could listen to?
#12
Verb on guitars really has to be minimal/avoided usually unless you've got a one guitar section with a panned reverb - that's pretty cool. If you're just a straight up rock/metal band I'd avoid it altogether though.

On drums yeah sure, great for filling out tom/snare sounds but a complete bitch to get a handle on and a lot of it depends on the algorithm you are using (I've found this really really varies; nothing easier to spot than a cheap reverb).

There are a lot of things I reach for before reverb usually, if you feel the balance isn't right before you're sticking it on then theres basically room for improvement in your mix, I always feel reverb is a mainly atmospheric thing.
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