#1
Hey!
I had a pretty horrible and cheap Stagg strat for four years and now I upgraded to a new, used, Cort EVL Z2 (LP type) with new, better, custom humbuckers.
I have a few questions.
There are some things that I'm not sure what to make of. I'm not sure if it's how it's supposed to be and I didn't experience these things, because of the cheap guitar or something's wrong.

The strings resonate each other. For example, when I play higher strings - G and B, my lower strings - E, A and sometimes D start ringing, which is annoying, and it sounds bad.

And also, these humbuckers are slightly loose and very close to the strings, is that normal?

Thanks for any help.
#2
try lowering your pickups. either they're magnetically vibrating the strings or your guitar is possesed by demonic aliens. and no, they don't come in peace.
Call me Chris
Quote by jimihendrix6699
had a blast until the person in front of me whipped out his dick and started pissing all over the floor..

Ducks and guitars or fish and guitars. I lead a simple existence
#3
I lowered those pickups as much as I could and it is still doing it. No difference.
#4
Quote by Akaforty
Hey!
I had a pretty horrible and cheap Stagg strat for four years and now I upgraded to a new, used, Cort EVL Z2 (LP type) with new, better, custom humbuckers.
I have a few questions.
There are some things that I'm not sure what to make of. I'm not sure if it's how it's supposed to be and I didn't experience these things, because of the cheap guitar or something's wrong.

The strings resonate each other. For example, when I play higher strings - G and B, my lower strings - E, A and sometimes D start ringing, which is annoying, and it sounds bad.

And also, these humbuckers are slightly loose and very close to the strings, is that normal?

Thanks for any help.


Just sounds like sympathetic ringing. IE. Open strings you don't play ring out due to the mechanical vibration being transferred through the guitar body caused by strings you do play.

The effect is very prominent if youre using high gain, or high distortion.

You should be muting stings you don't play by improving your muting technique so they don't ring out un-necessarily.
#5
Quote by Phoenix V
Just sounds like sympathetic ringing. IE. Open strings you don't play ring out due to the mechanical vibration being transferred through the guitar body caused by strings you do play.

The effect is very prominent if youre using high gain, or high distortion.

You should be muting stings you don't play by improving your muting technique so they don't ring out un-necessarily.

Oh, i see.
Well, the thing is there are many 'new' things on this guitar that I never noticed on the old stagg. Like it was so bad that it was actually better.
Last edited by Akaforty at Oct 16, 2011,
#6
Quote by Akaforty
Oh, i see.
Well, the thing is there are many 'new' things on this guitar that I never noticed on the old stagg. Like it so so bad that it was actually better.


Yeah I understand. It all comes down to the wood, construction, bridge, etc etc how easily sympathetic ringing can transfer between strings.

But it's best to learn to mute your strings as part of your playing development, because as you just discovered some guitars exhibit sympthetic ringing very easily, others don't.

Solve that whole issue by learning to mute correctly on any guitar you decide to play
#7
Quote by Phoenix V
Yeah I understand. It all comes down to the wood, construction, bridge, etc etc how easily sympathetic ringing can transfer between strings.

But it's best to learn to mute your strings as part of your playing development, because as you just discovered some guitars exhibit sympthetic ringing very easily, others don't.

Solve that whole issue by learning to mute correctly on any guitar you decide to play

Yeah. Thanks alot :-)
#8
Quote by Akaforty
Hey!
I had a pretty horrible and cheap Stagg strat for four years.


Just out of interest, what Stagg strat did you have?