#1
I think I finally understand polyrhythms. Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't it just when two (or more) independent rhythms are going?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nov3l4lgShM

At 0:23 seconds in, I'm pretty sure a 4:3 polyrhythm starts where the cymbals are playing the 3 beats and the bass drum is playing the 4 beats? Could anyone check this to see if I'm right?
#2
Polyrhythm: all bars start and end at the same time, but different time sigs are being emphasised ontop of one another

Polymeter: same bpm, but different time sig, so bars don't always line up

As for the video, I can't watch right now, sorry
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#4
Maybe
But polyrythm in a song doesnt mean it have to something else than 4:4.
It can simply just be all 4:4... just off-beat playing...
what the heck, this song is jsut messing with my head anyway, and who the hell tune down to G#?
#5
Yes but i would add that whatever the rhythm, it mathematically adds up at some point to the other rhythm.
#6
I don't think it is. It just kind of feels that way because of the dotted notes. Maybe I'm wrong.

The only example of polymeter I've ever actually noticed in a song is in Colossal by Scale The Summit. I'm sure it happens plenty more in prog bands, I just never notice it.
#7
Quote by A Poe
Yes but i would add that whatever the rhythm, it mathematically adds up at some point to the other rhythm.


That's a polymeter, not a polyrhythm
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#8
Quote by JB95
Maybe
But polyrythm in a song doesnt mean it have to something else than 4:4.
It can simply just be all 4:4... just off-beat playing...
what the heck, this song is jsut messing with my head anyway, and who the hell tune down to G#?

If it's all in 4/4, and off beat, it's syncopated, not a poly-anything.

Tuning down to G# is pretty easy on a 7 string too. A few bands do this with 6 strings though
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#9
Well there's a difference between polymeter and polyrhythm. The kick drum happens whenever the guitar strums at that part, so I think there is a 4:3 polyrhythm going on between the kick/cymbals, but the snare is 4/4. So it's kind of like a polymeter mixed with a polyrhythm if I'm right?
#12
Quote by pigeonmafia
Polyrhythm: all bars start and end at the same time, but different time sigs are being emphasised ontop of one another

Polymeter: same bpm, but different time sig, so bars don't always line up

As for the video, I can't watch right now, sorry

So if I played over a 12 bar in different time signatures till it added up to the 1 of the start of the next progression, it would be a polyrhythm? At the moment I do something like that.

Some of these descriptions make me think "syncopation," (people saying that it's a different time signature, in a different bpm, stretched across the beat) but that can't be right...

Am I being a tard?
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#13
Alright... let me set the record straight:

Polymeter: Take 3/4 and 4/4 and put them on top of each other. The accents wouldn't line up. Meshuggah does this often (they'd have the snare and cymbals in 4/4 while the bass drum and the rest of the band are in 17/16). The accents to the 3/4 on 4/4 are as follows:


Straight 4/4: [highlight]1[/highlight] 2 3 4 [highlight]1[/highlight] 2 3 4 [highlight]1[/highlight] 2 3 4 
Polymeter: [highlight]1[/highlight] 2 3 [highlight]4[/highlight] 1 2 [highlight]3[/highlight] 4 1 [highlight]2[/highlight] 3 4 


Polyrhythm: It's a little harder to illustrate, so I'm just going to use a hemiola: 3:2.



For every 3 triplet 8th notes there are two normal 8th notes. This is a polyrhythm. In metal, it's usually in the cymbals (the ride will be doing triplets where everything else will be doing normal rhythms).

This can be extended to bigger rhythms that AREN'T triplets though. For another 3:2 example, 3 quarter notes in the space of 2 dotted quarters. It's still 3 notes for every 2, it's just in longer rhythms.
#14
^ So a 3:2 polyrhythm could also be quarter note triplets over quarter notes?

Also this song is a good example of a polymeter.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mD4O5YiZ0tY
#15
Quote by mdc
^ So a 3:2 polyrhythm could also be quarter note triplets over quarter notes?

Also this song is a good example of a polymeter.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mD4O5YiZ0tY

Yes.

And a 5:4 could be 5 pentuplet 16ths against 4 16ths. So on and so forth.
#16
+1 to DiminishedFifth.

Polyrythm is playing different accented rythms or durations against eachother simultaneously. The easiest way to demonstrate it would be with clapping + a metronome. So, say I had a pulse being felt as three quarter notes (3/4), I could create a 2:3 polyrythm by looping dotted quarter notes over it. On the flip side, I could create a 3:2 polyrythm simply by inverting which rythm is felt as primary in that arrangement (the dotted quarter notes now become my quarter note pulse, and what was the quarter note pulse beforehand now becomes quarter note triplets over the pulse).
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Oct 13, 2011,
#17
At 0:23 seconds in, I'm pretty sure a 4:3 polyrhythm starts where the cymbals are playing the 3 beats and the bass drum is playing the 4 beats? Could anyone check this to see if I'm right?


Yup. Most of the people in the thread are hopelessly confused, but you have it right in the very first post!

^ So a 3:2 polyrhythm could also be quarter note triplets over quarter notes?


Yup!

Well there's a difference between polymeter and polyrhythm. The kick drum happens whenever the guitar strums at that part, so I think there is a 4:3 polyrhythm going on between the kick/cymbals, but the snare is 4/4. So it's kind of like a polymeter mixed with a polyrhythm if I'm right?


Where's your other meter then?

A polymeter would have overlapping time sigs. That piece is just in 4/4 (ed: actually, not at all in 4/4, lots of different stuff there! ), polyrhythms or no.

You'll find that a lot of polymeters end up being polyrhythmic too, but they're not equivalent.

I wrote up a decent explan-o-post somewhere...

http://www.sevenstring.org/forum/1488745-post63.html

There we go!