#1
Hey all.
I heard that writing away from an instrument is actually a good excersise.
But how would I know how something sounds when I'm away from a guitar?
All I can think of is just drawing some random lines.
#2
Beethoven was making music while being deaf.
If you can imagine all the notes in your head, it shouldn't be a problem to you either.
Still it can take a year or two of experience to be capable of doing it.
#3
One thing I've started doing recently, after having become very familiar with interval training, is sight singing.

That helps me to notate melodies that I come up with away from the guitar.
All I can think of is just drawing some random lines.

Now add a clef, a time signature, and perhaps some notes.
#4
i do this without even meaning to, i'll just hear a sound, or a beat, or song/riff whatever and then it just inspires me and i start hearing different riffs in my head, then when i next get to my head i just play what i think i heard. I know it makes me sound like either a dickhead or a crazy person XD but thats how i write my shit
#5
Whenever he got an idea, a friend of mine always used to imitate a rhythm with his voice and record it on his mobile phone. Then play it back when he got home and jam a riff out.
#8
Quote by liampje
I don't have an iPad

The correct version of this would be:
I don't have an iPad

You are a far better person than all those who have jumped on the bandwagon of being trendy and purchasing random products simply because they start with a lower case 'i'.


Seriously though, it's basically what the other guys have said. Come up with the riff, melody, or whatever other part the idea is, think it through in your head and plan the song out as much as possible. Then figure out how to play it.

Recording yourself humming the tune is always a good suggestion, that way you won't forget it before you get the chance to play it.

It will take a bit of practice, but it can be a good way of working because it frees you from the usual patterns you may fall into when you have an instrument in your hands.
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Last edited by GaryBillington at Oct 14, 2011,
#9
You need to work on your ear. That will help you understand how things sound when you can't play or sing them.
#11
learn how certain things sound: common chord progressions, cadences, intervals, ect. then write them in sheet music. tab won't help you here, it needs to be sheet music.
#13
Quote by TMVATDI
learn how certain things sound: common chord progressions, cadences, intervals, ect. then write them in sheet music. tab won't help you here, it needs to be sheet music.

Actually you could use tab if you included rhythm notation with it
Ex:Generic gallops

A|-2-2-2---2-2-2--
E|-0-0-0---0-0-0--
---S-S-E---S-S-E--

When I was in school I had used this to notate ideas from my head so I could remember them long enough to get home
#14
Quote by 37 Narwhals
Actually you could use tab if you included rhythm notation with it
Ex:Generic gallops

A|-2-2-2---2-2-2--
E|-0-0-0---0-0-0--
---S-S-E---S-S-E--

When I was in school I had used this to notate ideas from my head so I could remember them long enough to get home

the rhythm isn't the problem. music theory is a huge help to writing music away from an instrument, knowing how a V-I sounds for example, and sheet music is the language to expressing these things. tabs are guitar specific, telling you where to put your fingers to play a certain piece, sheet music is pure music.