#1
A lot of people say you should learn licks, but I don't know how to use them in practice.
For example, I know 5 licks and have a I-IV-V backing track at 100bpm. Now what? I usually just noodle on pentatonics...
Good old Pete. Isn't he too old to masturbate? - Pete Townshend
Don't mind your make-up, you better make your mind up. - Frank Zappa
#2
Licks are a pre-prepared series of notes that you can use to help construct a solo. The idea is that you use the licks as a foundation for a passage and then build from there. You use them essentially the same way you use any other note or series of notes - play them.
#4
Yep, pentatonic, position 1 and 2. One of them resolves to the V, the others to the root.
Good old Pete. Isn't he too old to masturbate? - Pete Townshend
Don't mind your make-up, you better make your mind up. - Frank Zappa
#5
Improvise and make new licks. If you get stuck bust out a lick and figure out where to go from there!
╘MESHUG╦G╗AH





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#6
A lick is just a bunch of notes that sound a certain way...if you want that sound then you use them.
Actually called Mark!

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#7
Ok, thanks for the help. So, all in all, I'm better off creating my own licks that I like, than learning other people's, right?
Good old Pete. Isn't he too old to masturbate? - Pete Townshend
Don't mind your make-up, you better make your mind up. - Frank Zappa
#8
Quote by Tvrtko1
Ok, thanks for the help. So, all in all, I'm better off creating my own licks that I like, than learning other people's, right?


NO! Not right at all!

When you improvise, you are creating something based on what you already know. So it makes sense to learn licks and passages from various guitarists (start from your main influences). Then you can add those licks to you're "repertoire" which will naturally come out in your playing.
#9
Can't stress enough the importance of the old blues/rock licks, here. For instance a lot of Jimmy Page/Tony Iommi's earlier lead work relies pretty heavily on stock licks which are incredibly useful tools for lead guitar playing and easy to get going really fast - check out any of the solos on Kill 'Em All by Metallica - almost everything is or is a variation on the old tried and true stock rock/blues licks used by the old blues guys and sped up by the 60/70s rock gods.
#10
Learn theory and know where does licks come from.

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/guitar-technique/the-pentatonic-scale-chart/ This article should help.

I am talking about the relationship between pentatonic shapes and chords.

By learning this stuff you will always know where the licks come from and you will be able to transpose the licks in all positions to see how it sounds like.

That is my approach
#11
Quote by Tvrtko1
Ok, thanks for the help. So, all in all, I'm better off creating my own licks that I like, than learning other people's, right?


You can use whatever licks get your groove going on man. I'm a huge Dimebag fan so here's something I'd throw in ala Dimebag. Just use your ear man, I'm not great at putting riffs to chord changes, I just know what sounds groovy and what sounds like a drag.



w/ Whammy bar
e|-12--15-13-/h15/p13----------------*----------------------------*------------------------
b|-x-------------------------s/---10-p/0-(dive) /h4-/p0-*4&3/4*--(hold and vibrato)-
g|x----------------------------s/-12-------------------------------------------------------------


ALA Angus Young

e|----------------------
b|-------10---------12
g|-------10---------12
d|12-12----12-12-----


If you listen to Camden on my profile that'll give you a sound idea on Licks, since the entire thing was written on like the same 4 chords and licks are used EXTENSIVELY!!!!
╘MESHUG╦G╗AH





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#12
Learn some chords. Figure out a rhythm based on chord progression. Play a few riffs, that'll give you an idea of the pace and flow of the song. Then with all that in your head, improvise while staying in the same key to fit the chord progression. Chords define your key, riffs define your flow: tempo, pace, blahblah and help transition those chords in an effective way. Licks are the icing on the cake, but without sprinkles it's still a plain cake.

Those sprinkles my friend, that's your little flavoring on the cake. Your own touch of style to throw into the mix. That's where you improvise transitions between those licks as well as original note progressions (your own licks, essentially.) or drawn out notes to accentuate.

Learn other peoples licks for an idea of what you can do, then make your own. But learn rhythm too or you're just like every other guitarist out there; shred over anything but clueless as to where to begin.

Edit:: I should throw in that I started 6 years ago, took lessons for 2 months back then and learned like 3 licks. I havent played any of them in 5 years and Jesus' second coming will happen before I do remember em I'm rhythm all the way baby.
Quote by fly135
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I figured it out.
Last edited by Ishiga at Oct 15, 2011,
#13
Quote by Tvrtko1
Ok, thanks for the help. So, all in all, I'm better off creating my own licks that I like, than learning other people's, right?


I'd say learn licks from MANY players you like.

For example i like licks in style of players like Alexi lahio, michael romeo, Vinnie moore etc. Then i learn those licks, and use them as a foundation of my playing.
Since i have learned licks by many players i like if i put it together and change it to my liking it will more and more build up my own style.

I hope that made sense. Cheers.