#1
Hi! I've been interested lately in learning perfect pitch but I don't really know where to start with this.
I've started with remembering C and B on two octaves and singing it without reference.
It works good for now but I started 2 days ago and I'd like to know what should be my next steps?

I've bought Pure Pitch program and also the one by David Lucas Burge a while ago but it was too much information for me to start with.

I'd like any tips from you guys on how to build perfect pitch from scratch!


A huge thank to you!
#2
Just continue on with what you're doing for more notes. Test yourself regularly against your guitar/piano etc.
#3
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#4
I don't think it's something you can learn as much as it's something you can tweak.

I was born with perfect pitch (sorry for sounding like I'm bragging), so I am not sure whether I'm correct on that matter.
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#5
Quote by Wolfinator-x
I don't think it's something you can learn as much as it's something you can tweak.

I was born with perfect pitch (sorry for sounding like I'm bragging), so I am not sure whether I'm correct on that matter.



You can learn it, it's just much more difficult as you get older.

I know families of musicians who all have perfect pitch because they used to play 'guess the note' games around a piano.
#6
not to divert you away from perfect pitch, but many musicians agree that relative pitch is better than perfect pitch. if anything, i'd obtain relative pitch and then perfect pitch
#7
The ad model is quite the dandy, isn't he? Someone with perfect pitch, perfect teeth, and perfect hair, is thrice blessed... It's like winning the ego booster trifecta....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 14, 2011,
#8
Quote by mrwiggles35
not to divert you away from perfect pitch, but many musicians agree that relative pitch is better than perfect pitch. if anything, i'd obtain relative pitch and then perfect pitch



If you're good enough at music, perfect pitch is better than relative pitch since you'll be able to work your way around any of the tricks/changes that occur that usually throw people with perfect pitch off.
#10
honestly, I personally don't believe that it can be properly developed at a later stage in life. I believe it is either an ability you're born with, or develop at a young age. Both people I have met with perfect pitch have been playing piano since the age of 6 or 8. Most other stories have been similar to that: it seems that most people with perfect pitch were raised around music. Honestly, I think of it like a language. If a kid grows up in a home where Spanish is spoken, what's he going to speak naturally? Spanish. The same with ANY language. Music to me is like that. Kids' minds are so impressionable, that if they grow up around music and being told what the names of each note is, etc, then they'll probably (or at least be more likely to) develop perfect pitch.
Again, there are those lucky dogs that are born with it, but I know I'm going to make my kids learn piano and stuff :P
Another thing I heard was this lady who had a color-coded xylophone as a kid with the notes labeled on it, so she learned to associate notes with colors.

Honestly, perfect pitch is a mysterious thing that we really know little about. What I personally do to try and identify pitches is sing them to myself, and judge them based on where they are in my range. I am very familiar with my voice and how certain notes sound and feel to my voice, so I can generally get close that way. For example, I heard a note and sang it, and guessed it was a D. It turned out it was a C# (this was just a few minutes ago). Stuff like that I can do, as well as guessing guitar tunings in songs, chord progressions, *sometimes* guessing keys correctly, etc. ALL of it has come from years of listening to music, playing music, and learning about music theory. The more my ear has become familiar with how things sound, the easier it is to identify. I suppose it stands to reason that if you listened to notes often enough and identified them by name, you'd become familiar enough to name them off pretty well too. I'll let you know in ten years if I've developed that particular gift or not
#11
Bullshit, it takes around 10,000 hours to master ANYTHING. - doing the right things-
Luck, talent, born with, blessed with, age.. blahblah you can even speak better than a native speaking person if you devote more time and effort than that person (condition is you do the right things)
oh hes so talented, oh hes so lucky, its all bs man, try hard, try harder, keep trying, carve that goal in stone in your mind, work all the time you can on achieving it, be CONSISTENT, post in around 10 years and tell us how cool it is that you acquired perfect pitch
#12
^ im inclined to agree, most people who are REALLY good at something is because they worked super super hard at it. i mean some people are a little better off than other due to certain small things, but if you put a lot of effort into something you can master it.
#13
Quote by Slashiepie
Bullshit, it takes around 10,000 hours to master ANYTHING. - doing the right things-
Luck, talent, born with, blessed with, age.. blahblah you can even speak better than a native speaking person if you devote more time and effort than that person (condition is you do the right things)
oh hes so talented, oh hes so lucky, its all bs man, try hard, try harder, keep trying, carve that goal in stone in your mind, work all the time you can on achieving it, be CONSISTENT, post in around 10 years and tell us how cool it is that you acquired perfect pitch



Those 5 year olds with perfect pitch didn't practice it for 10,000 hours.

Some people have an affinity for recognising pitches and 'get it' very early on and some don't. It's possible to develop perfect pitch in your lifetime, it's just a matter of how you develop it.
#14
Perfect pitch is a good goal, but you should focus on relative pitch. Not all the great guitarists have a perfect pitch

you should check out this article :

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/ear-training/ear-training-intervals/

Also check the ear training section and read those.

For starting out just play a scale for 20 minutes a day.

It may sound silly but it really helps.

Take a C major and sing it up and down by pronouncing the notes in your head when singing them out.

Another aspect about ear training to consider: DON'T OVERDO IT.

All the experienced musicians i so, told me to practice ear training (the singing stuff) for maximum 30 minutes a day.

The important about ear training is also WHEN you practice it. It is indicated that you practice eat in the morning when you are more relaxed.

Hope i helped you, cheers,

Paul
#15
Quote by XianXiuHong
Those 5 year olds with perfect pitch didn't practice it for 10,000 hours.

Some people have an affinity for recognising pitches and 'get it' very early on and some don't. It's possible to develop perfect pitch in your lifetime, it's just a matter of how you develop it.


Dude:
Each year has 365 days, each day has 24 hours =
they have been living 43.800 hours to be exact, half of them awake (the brain sitll learns when sleeping but lets ignore that)

they have been practicing around 20.000 hours.
it didnt magically fall upon them..kids dont have a job and all they do is take in all they can to make sense of the world:
They happened to pay attention to sound (why? god? genes? influence during the gestation period, irrelevant) they got it right from the beginning and expanded upon their "skill", by "practicing=using their skill for hours"

People need to stop making excuses and realize its all about TIME. -let me reiterate again - doing the "right" things.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Oct 15, 2011,
#16
Quote by Slashiepie
Dude:
Each year has 365 days, each day has 24 hours =
they have been living 43.800 hours to be exact, half of them awake (the brain sitll learns when sleeping but lets ignore that)

they have been practicing around 20.000 hours.
it didnt magically fall upon them..kids dont have a job and all they do is take in all they can to make sense of the world:
They happened to pay attention to sound (why? god? genes? influence during the gestation period, irrelevant) they got it right from the beginning and expanded upon their "skill", by "practicing=using their skill for hours"

People need to stop making excuses and realize its all about TIME. -let me reiterate again - doing the "right" things.



In that case, majority of the guitarists of the world who've been playing just two and a half years should be masters of playing guitar if you use your logic like that. I don't know what you're trying to argue now, seeing as we both agree that it's how and what you practice.

The only thing I said was that some people are born with the ability to be able to recognise pitches better than others, making them have perfect pitch.

I'm not making an excuse for not having perfect pitch, I'm merely saying that there is such a thing as people being 'born' with it. Of course, you can't be born knowing all the pitch names but you can definitely have the advantage of being able to remember pitches much better than other people.
#17
yeah I stand behind that logic,
2.5 years playing 12 hours a day = 10.950
by then you will have amazing skills.

thats what guys like Vai, Yngwie and Satch have done, except they did it even longer..
hence they are not excellent anymore, they are "virtuosos"
#18
Quote by Slashiepie
yeah I stand behind that logic,
2.5 years playing 12 hours a day = 10.950
by then you will have amazing skills.

thats what guys like Vai, Yngwie and Satch have done, except they did it even longer..
hence they are not excellent anymore, they are "virtuosos"



...

Not sure if trolling or just stupid.
#19
Quote by XianXiuHong
...

Not sure if trolling or just stupid.


Not sure if your IQ is a couple standard deviations below the average person, but it works for average people on an incredible array of skills, will they have mastered something ?
no way! be pretty good at it ? hell yeah
maybe you have been playing for years and still suck, maybe you are just slow and it took you 20 years to get where you are, mediocrity is a choice

I double dare any mofo to play guitar for 12 hours a day - with a routine for 3 years - and still suck at it. effort mofo do you know it ?
I double dare that same mofo to keep playing 12 hours for another 3 years and not be a virtuoso
i double dare that same mofo to keep playing and not become a "guitar god"

whatever you keep your limiting beliefs , ill keep mine, time will tell.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Oct 15, 2011,
#20
Quote by Slashiepie
Bullshit, it takes around 10,000 hours to master ANYTHING. - doing the right things-
Luck, talent, born with, blessed with, age.. blahblah you can even speak better than a native speaking person if you devote more time and effort than that person (condition is you do the right things)
oh hes so talented, oh hes so lucky, its all bs man, try hard, try harder, keep trying, carve that goal in stone in your mind, work all the time you can on achieving it, be CONSISTENT, post in around 10 years and tell us how cool it is that you acquired perfect pitch



I guess it's true that those kids weren't necessarily "born" with perfect pitch. They probably developed it over their lives. My point was that kids' minds are so much more impressionable than adults, because they're developing and growing and learning. If they learn as a kid what the names of the notes are, it's much more likely to imprint upon their brains. They don't even have to try as hard, because their brains are like sponges. By the time you're an adult, your brain has tailored itself to certain ways of thinking and you have decided who you are. That's where the saying "you can't teach an old dog new tricks" comes from. By the time you're older, your brain isn't as open to new things.
That's not at all to say its impossible. Anything is possible. I just don't have a lot of hope for myself learning it. I'm 19, so I'm hoping I'm not too young I just can't help remembering my old choir teacher, who was a brilliant pianist and has been playing and singing longer than I've been alive (probably longer than my mom's been alive), and has been trying to develop perfect pitch for years with no success. I suppose it's not hopeless, but I personally put little stock in developing perfect pitch or methods of developing it.
#21
Quote by =(Cody=)
I guess it's true that those kids weren't necessarily "born" with perfect pitch. They probably developed it over their lives. My point was that kids' minds are so much more impressionable than adults, because they're developing and growing and learning. If they learn as a kid what the names of the notes are, it's much more likely to imprint upon their brains. They don't even have to try as hard, because their brains are like sponges. By the time you're an adult, your brain has tailored itself to certain ways of thinking and you have decided who you are. That's where the saying "you can't teach an old dog new tricks" comes from. By the time you're older, your brain isn't as open to new things.
That's not at all to say its impossible. Anything is possible. I just don't have a lot of hope for myself learning it. I'm 19, so I'm hoping I'm not too young I just can't help remembering my old choir teacher, who was a brilliant pianist and has been playing and singing longer than I've been alive (probably longer than my mom's been alive), and has been trying to develop perfect pitch for years with no success. I suppose it's not hopeless, but I personally put little stock in developing perfect pitch or methods of developing it.


Makes perfect sense: kids dont have all the stupid schematas we adults have, they dont worry about jobs, relationships, careers, the end of the world, they only have time to learn and learn and absorb, form new connections in the brain and indeed absorb liks sponges.

You have all the hope in the world man, remember adults imagination although really poor in comparison can draw from something kids lack.. Experience! (+ the ability/sometimes disability to have a methodical and scientific approach to things)

try to find people that have learned it at an older age , wish you success!
Last edited by Slashiepie at Oct 15, 2011,
#22
Quote by Slashiepie
Not sure if your IQ is a couple standard deviations below the average person, but it works for average people on an incredible array of skills, will they have mastered something ?
no way! be pretty good at it ? hell yeah
maybe you have been playing for years and still suck, maybe you are just slow and it took you 20 years to get where you are, mediocrity is a choice

I double dare any mofo to play guitar for 12 hours a day - with a routine for 3 years - and still suck at it. effort mofo do you know it ?
I double dare that same mofo to keep playing 12 hours for another 3 years and not be a virtuoso
i double dare that same mofo to keep playing and not become a "guitar god"

whatever you keep your limiting beliefs , ill keep mine, time will tell.



Oh, so your initial argument was that if you practice something for 10,000 hours, you'll master it.

Now your argument has changed to they won't have mastered it but they will be pretty good at it?

If my IQ's a couple standard deviations below average, I'm not quite sure what that says about you considering how your argument has flowed.

Limiting my beliefs? We agree on the idea that it takes 10,000 hours to actually be good at something, the only thing I argued initially was that some people are born with the affinity for recognising pitches better than others and thus, do not require the 10,000 hours that another person would.

Really, if you don't understand my argument now, I give up, you win, you get all the cake and win the internet.
#23
I think you could if you had a ipod with different versions of the same note (like on different instruments) and had something like a music quiz which asked you which note it was and played it.

I think after doing this for a while you'd get perfect pitch.
#24
Being "born" with perfect pitch (absolute pitch is the correct name) is a total myth. It absolutely can be learned by anyone willing to put the time (about a year) into doing it. When you first start you'll underestimate just how much of a sensitive skill it is, it's surprising. Day by day however the colors of the tones will start to become more obvious eventually getting to the point where they are obvious.