#1
Tomorrow i'l be recording this guy who plays guitar and his friend on sax and, to be honest, I never recorded a sax before and have no idea how it's done.

What type of microphone would be the best suited for that? and how Should I position the mic?

has anyone here done this before?
#2
The same way you'd mic anything else, really. There are no rules for anything, use the mic you think sounds best and position it where you think that sounds best. What are your options? Do you have a stereo pair/do you ever use more than one mic at a time? That's the best way to record most things, in my opinion.
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#3
I have acces to a lot of mics actualy. I just dont know what will sound great and dont have much time to test out multiple mics. so Id like a reference, Im thinking using a Large Condenser but I dont know.
#4
Dunno about in the studio, but live I've thrown a spare '57 pointed down the bell of the sax - they're very, very loud so if you don't have a nice room I'd suggest a dynamic mic aimed towards or down the bell.

If you do use a condenser at a distance,beware you don't end up with a really honky sound (unless that's what you need, a la funk or rocky jazz).
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Oct 13, 2011,
#5
If I had access to it, I'd start with an MD421 just outside the bell.

Really any decent dynamic would work. I wouldn't start with a condenser, but if I wouldn't rule it out if dynamics just weren't cutting it.
#6
A ribbon mic would probably be ideal, if you've got one available.

I know a band with a large brass section and their demos never sound good, brass tends to come out very bright and thin unless it's done properly.

If it's just adding backing, something bright like an SM57 will do fine and help it cut through a mix.
If the sax is a main part of the arrangement, you'll want a big fat warm tone to fill out the sound better, so a ribbon or tube condenser would probably work best .

Have a listen to Morphine for a fantastic 'rock sax' sound: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PaI_BMtm3jc . Note the warmth, wide pan and dark room sound.
#7
So with what im getting form you guys.

I think, I'll be using a Sm57 or some good dynamic mic close to the bell. Then Maybe a condenser picking up the sound of higher, who knows might sound interesting in the mix.

Hows that sound?
#8
Quote by ShevanelFlip
So with what im getting form you guys.

I think, I'll be using a Sm57 or some good dynamic mic close to the bell. Then Maybe a condenser picking up the sound of higher, who knows might sound interesting in the mix.

Hows that sound?

Yep, the room condenser could be quite good for bringing a bit of air and definition in to the mix. As for the dynamic, it's best to get it very close for more proximity effect (as saxophones can put out quite a bit of low end and you don't want it lost beneath too much biting trebley brass.

Might sound obvious but the closer to the centre of the bell you go, you may well get more low end but you'll find most of it is air buffeting the capsule - if you need more of the 'brassiness' and metallic sound, move closer to the rim of the bell. In fact, I'd say start pointing in (off-axis) slightly, from an off-centre position (probably have the mic coming up and into the bell slightly, depending on how the player holds the sax) and then see what you can find with experimentation.

If you want to bring in a condenser, I'd find a good sound with the condenser first, and then bring in the dynamic to embellish an aspect of the sound you like or feel the song will need.
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#9
hey hope this post isn't too late but don't rule out a small diaphragm condenser. I mic'd up an orchestra for the Salem MA town fireworks and we used shure sm98's on the saxaphones and trumpets, it sounded amazing.

Good luck
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