#1
power chords.

do you switch INSTANTLY? flawlessly? 'cause its too fast, what i mean is..
when people strum, for example, is it..

(C7) U D U D -> (B7) U D U D

OR

(C7) U D U .. -> (open) D -> (B7) U D U D

Does the same apply to chords?


How about the first few sec of Hangar 18, are there any open strumming in those?
#2
that depends on the tempo and the chords im switching also the struming pattern

for that example if its played quickly id probalay play a muted note during the change for rhythm or cause it souncd cool not cause i cant do the chnge quickly
#3
Depends on what I think sounds best, but I usually slide up or down to the next chord.

If you want to change chords flawlessly, then it's all about practicing.
#4
Quote by Nicknorman
Depends on what I think sounds best, but I usually slide up or down to the next chord.

If you want to change chords flawlessly, then it's all about practicing.
you can slide if their roots are in the same bass string, what if they aren't?
#5
Quote by luxeion
you can slide if their roots are in the same bass string, what if they aren't?



then you have to change the fingering... but yeah its all about practice and putting the time in if you wana do it fast. Strumming pattern is whatever you want the song to sound like because if you change the strumming pattern you often change the sound or feel of the riff.
#6
I use all of my fingers to ensure a smoother transition
EX:

D|---------9-9-9-9-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7---------
A|-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-7-7-7-7-
E|-5-5-5-5-------------------------5-5-5-5-

For the A5 I'd use my index and ring fingers, for the E5 I'd use my ring and pinky, for the D I'd slide my pinky down and use my index and pinky, and Index and ring for the A5 again.
For actual chords it depends on the chords themselves.
Last edited by 37 Narwhals at Oct 14, 2011,
#7
Here's another approach to the issue. First. the guitar is set up around sharp keys. since all the open strings are the tonic notes of keys with sharps in them.

Thus if you open up a string when in most sharp keys, the open string will, more often than not, harmonize.

I suppose changing chords fast by practice, sliding between them, or muting between them, should be determined by mood and intended effect, not by any single rule.

I know capos are despised by some, and guitarists are accused of being "lazy" for using them. But, I think that completely misses the actual purpose.

If you stick a capo on the first fret for the keys of Ab, and Db, your open strings will then likely be in the key you're playing.

Many country songs are capoed on the 3rd fret. This nets the keys of Eb, Bb, C, and F.

It's is done to accommodate the C and F necks of the pedal steel, and also the vocal range of many alto singers.

So, now your open strings would harmonize with those flat keys, and you can slide, open up, mute, or quick change the chords to your heart's content, without as much danger of going out of key as you would by playing these keys at position.
#8
When it comes to this kind of situation there are no particular good approaches.

All you have to do is just see what comes more easy to you.

I would goo for the D U approach. The secret is in practicing that pattern 1000 times until it becomes easy, not in trying to figure out if you need to go U,D or D,U instead of wondering jos practice the darn thing at a low BPM, and increase from there.