#1
Hi, i've been playing guitar since 2004 and i played with my whole arm in the beginning..
then in 2008 i started to use my wrist.. anyhow... i haven't seen any big difference in my speed... just a little one. im alot more precise in my playing.. but not as fast as i want to be..

..and i wonder if righthand speed is about strength that i should build more muscles, or if im just doing something wrong... does some one know?

and does me being lefthanded (playing righthanded) have anything to do with this?

thanks in advance
#2
and does me being lefthanded (playing righthanded) have anything to do with this?


Not really. Everyone struggles with picking plateaus, it's very hard to "build speed" with picking. You need to work on stamina, dynamics (ie, loud and soft playing), and string crossing.

If you want to make consistent progress with picking, in my opinion it's necessary to do around 40 mins a day, every day, for at least a couple of months.
#4
I'm left handed playing right handed also and you shouldn't worry about it at all. There's quite a few pros who are lefty's playing right. One example is Herman Li from Dragonforce and he's insanely fast.

You also get the benefits of a strong fretting hand which makes legato easier.

I wouldn't worry about speed too much.. it comes with time (I definitely recommend the comment above about 45mins each day). Keeping in practice seems to build speed without trying.

Note - Also try different picks. I was using .88's.. dropped down to .60's for a few months to help build speed and then moved to .73's. That seemed to make a big difference with playing fast. What strings are you using as well? I've known new players using 12-56 and wondering why they're struggling for speed. IMO 10-46 are perfect for building speed.

p.s. with picks.. try Dunlop Jazz III (normal ones, not XL or anything). They're really small picks and some people find it makes them play faster. Petrucci said Jazz III's made him ultra fast because they're so small - increasing picking economy
Last edited by Leanland at Oct 14, 2011,
#5
i'm a left handed playing right handed too , but just like any other guitarist:practice practise practise
#6
I'm left handed playing right handed too. For a short period of time, I had trouble with fast picking, but everyone here is right: all you need is practise.
#7
I'm left handed playing right handed also and you shouldn't worry about it at all. There's quite a few pros who are lefty's playing right. One example is Herman Li from Dragonforce and he's insanely fast.

Insanely fast at using a computer?
#9
Picking speed is about muscle memory and relaxation. If you want to play faster, you need to become as relaxed as possible and practice making smaller, more economical movements with your picking hand. Make practicing smaller motions a part of your daily warmup and you'll start to see that you'll feel more and more comfortable picking at your "maximum speed". Then start practicing passages that used to be too fast. They might still be too fast to play cleanly and comfortably, but they will become less difficult as you make the newer, smaller motions more and more habitual.

As a lefty, I actually think that we have an advantage in picking technique playing right handed. For right handed players, the dominant hand is the picking hand, meaning that you would tend to worry more about your left hand technique, since your right hand will tend to be more dexterous. For lefties, this apparent handicap in picking means that you will be able to largely avoid having to practice complex frettings, since that's your dominant hand's worry, and really focus on your right handed technique, which is, in my opinion, the set of techniques that requires more focus to achieve cleanliness and relaxation.
#10
Quote by Geldin
As a lefty, I actually think that we have an advantage in picking technique playing right handed. For right handed players, the dominant hand is the picking hand, meaning that you would tend to worry more about your left hand technique, since your right hand will tend to be more dexterous. For lefties, this apparent handicap in picking means that you will be able to largely avoid having to practice complex frettings, since that's your dominant hand's worry, and really focus on your right handed technique, which is, in my opinion, the set of techniques that requires more focus to achieve cleanliness and relaxation.
I hear, see, and understand all you've written. It still doesn't explain why right handed guitars are strung the way they are. More properly, it flies in the face of it.

A conclusion that might also be drawn by inference, is that a left handed person should automatically be better at the the standard guitar than the right hander it was designed for.

Assuming you are completely correct, I'm still at a loss to explain why all guitars destined for right handed players, aren't strung left handed, and why left handed persons, don't have to have today's "right handed guitar" custom made for them.

As I said before, if all this is true, then ALL right handed guitar players have had a most heinous practical joke played on them by luthiers throughout history.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 14, 2011,
#11
^ or the guitar was designed to be played with the fingers and without the benefit of amplification...

Personally I don't think it matters which way round you start, so start righty - the gear is cheaper.
#12
Quote by Captaincranky
I hear, see, and understand all you've written. It still doesn't explain why right handed guitars are strung the way they are. More properly, it flies in the face of it.

A conclusion that might also be drawn by inference, is that a left handed person should automatically be better at the the standard guitar than the right hander it was designed for.

Assuming you are completely correct, I'm still at a loss to explain why all guitars destined for right handed players, aren't strung left handed, and why left handed persons, don't have to have today's "right handed guitar" custom made for them.

As I said before, if all this is true, then ALL right handed guitar players have had a most heinous practical joke played on them by luthiers throughout history.

If you look at classical guitars, the right hand technique is just as complex as the left hand technique, if not moreso. Consequently, it made more sense to put your dominant hand to the more complex task. In the case of classical guitar playing, that would be the right hand. As the guitar evolved into the steel-stringed guitar and eventually into the electric guitar, the instrument was simply adapted to be played in the same position, but the prevalence of the pick removed most of the more complex right hand technique from the equation.

None of this is to say that modern left handed technique is necessarily more complex than right handed technique, but for a left handed player, the more difficult task is likely to be right handed technique, since that is the non-dominant hand. Since left handed technique will likely come more easily to a lefty, that means that more focus and more practice time can be allocated towards right handed technique.
#13
thanks for all the post guys! i got really inspired to of all this and i think i got to hear what i need to hear!

and a special thanks to Geldin with the a little more in depth answer