#1
I believe that there are also beginners in this forum so i thought this thread would be useful to them.

Here is my input about a good teacher. I will also include factors that apparently have nothing to do with guitar playing.

1. You have to like him as a person. It's not ok to have a teacher who is arrogant (although he may have motive if he may be very good at guitar)

2. He should be interested in the same music you like.

Although music has it's fundamentals, every experienced guitar player knows that every style of music has it's own "secrets" that you get to know only if you study that style of music.
For example look at AC/DC, most people say they sound the same on all albums, but when we listen to some music that is close to AC/DC, our brain goes, cool that sounds like AC/DC.
This is what they did, they found the style they liked and got it better and better to the point where, AC/DC is basically a music genre .

3. A teacher doesn't necessarily have to be studied music at a school music.

Sure that could help, but the funny thing about music compared to other jobs where you need a diploma is that music is about how you express yourself.
You don't see Steve Vai or Slash playing with their music diploma next to them. In fact Jimmi Hendrix is well known for not knowing notes and despite of that he was and still is a guitar legend.

I saw many guitarist who were better then those that attended a school of music.

4. You have to understand what the teacher teaches you. You have to know how to apply what he teaches you

There is a saying: " A good guitar player is not necessarily a good teacher ".

The things you probably encountered when asking other players how they do things are stuff like:

" I don't know man, i just do it" or " Practice more".

These things are very frustrating and i bet some you know very well what i mean by that.

A good teacher knows how to show STEP BY STEP how to what he does, knows how to teach the mental process, the way he mixes musical concepts and so on, so that you are able to make music using those concepts.

5. Don't judge the value of a teacher by the prices he charges you.

There are some famous guitar players out there who charge you a lot of money and sincerely, when you are a beginner it is probably a waste of money because you could learn those things from other not so famous guitar player (who by the way maybe he didn't started to play guitar to get famous or earn lots of money).

6. This point is related to point 1. You have to like what the teacher plays, he has to have that " wow how do you do that, teach me !" thing.

Let's suppose you like jazz and you go to a teacher who likes shredding and such, and your goal is not to be fast, your goal is to put soul intro your music.

Of course that teacher will be cool for playing fast, but he won't be relevant to what you want.

I have seen such teachers at the school where i teach.

There is one guy who only likes blues and says that other kind of music is crappy. His students like metal and that's what they want to learn but he tells them they have to learn blues the rest doesn't matter.

I know that because i filled in for him one time and his students wanted me to be their teacher. Why? Because i like metal and i am not afraid of telling them that.

That's what it came to mind now, i hope these advices were useful to you,

Cheers,

Paul


You can see some of my musical development here
#2
I can't whole-heartedly agree with the first three points. I had a teacher who was kind of arrogant, a young jazz musician who had studied his stuff well. I didn't like the same music as he did, but I learned a lot from him. Theory or technique don't depend on genre. He taught me jazz stuff and I learned to apply it in my music in my own way. I'm glad I was his student.

I would never take lessons from someone who hasn't gone to a music school. I want my knowledge to be spot on. Someone who hasn't studied this stuff in a school can give me misinformation which would really suck. Steve Vai probably know his stuff, but lessons from Slash? No way.
E:-6
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#4
Quote by apajr

2. He should be interested in the same music you like.

I don't think he really needs to like the same music as you, as long as he's open minded, or, at the very least, keeps his negative opinions inside his head. I wouldn't feel very motivated to learn from someone who say my music is just noise/takes no talent/whatever bs he wants to say about it
#5
Quote by apajr
A teacher doesn't necessarily have to be studied music at a school music.

There is a saying: " A good guitar player is not necessarily a good teacher ".

Agree to both.

There's a similar saying with regard to sport - "If you can't play it, teach it."
#6
He shouldn't be stuborn like me.
People make mistakes and that's normal, covering it up with a lie isn't good.
PERIOD!
Or how I would like to say:
Monthly bleeding out of a woman's genitalia, where she won't die from.
Last edited by liampje at Oct 14, 2011,
#7
Quote by liampje
He shouldn't be stuborn like me.
People make mistakes and that's normal, covering it up with a lie isn't good.
PERIOD!
Or how I would like to say:
Monthly bleeding out of a woman's genitalia, where she won't die from.


... what?
#8
I think teachers should be patient, skilled, have exceptional listening skills not only to music but also the student, and they should lead while remaining flexible.

I agree that there has to be some form of sympatico and mutual respect between student and teacher. I disagree about having to play the same styles. That's good for learning SONGS but no necessarily learning THE INSTRUMENT.
#10
1. Patient
2. Kind
3. Should be able to explain and demonstrate clearly
4. Teaches you what you want, and not what he wants
5. He should be a technically good guitarist *
6. Should know music theory *


* - Conditions Apply


That's all I could think of at the moment.
#11
1. Cares - both about the student and the subject
2. is prepared - both lesson by lesson, and in terms of having a long range plan
3. individualizes the lesson to the student as much as possible
4. is creative and knowledgeable enough to find alternative ways of explaining/communicating things when the student doesn't "get it" the first time

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Quote by mdc

There's a similar saying with regard to sport - "If you can't play it, teach it."


Which is insulting to anyone who teaches anything.

First, it makes the supposition that those who teach only do so because they can't do anything else. What about people who WANT to teach, or who LIKE teaching, or who feel some sort of calling?

Second, it makes the supposition that teaching is really not important, and it is therefore okay to have someone who "can't" doing the teaching.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Well, you, and anyone else who read this that is a teacher, and I know there are a fair few on here, has an unreserved apology from me. Sorry.

If I may add, that remark was intended with an element of humor which is impossible to perceive through ASCII. Albeit, either on here, or face to face, one's humor is not always well received due to personality clashes.

The remark itself reflects someone who can carry out their profession very well, but may not be as successful with it, such the ideal, which can be down to circumstance, at which point the phrase tends to pop in to my head.

I am specifically talking about sport here as mentioned earlier, which is where the remark seemed, dare I say it, appropriate.

I first heard it used with that kind of joke element about it, and as a result, never considered the implications it would have on someone else, since it didn't insult me in any way.

I can appreciate from this point onwards that this could turn in to a pretty hairy subject, given the persistence of users here, and I don't expect to get back on anyone's good side any time soon. Not that I was in the first place.

Despite this, I do think my posts to help people are quite useful.

We've never really talked before, Chris. I hope we haven't got off on the wrong foot?

Cheers,

M
Last edited by mdc at Oct 14, 2011,
#14
Quote by liampje
That is a period.



Your sentence structure makes it sound funny to me.
#15
Quote by mdc

We've never really talked before, Chris. I hope we haven't got off on the wrong foot?

Cheers,

M


Nah. No worries. It's just that that particular phrase just bugs me.

But even in sports.... we all know that pro teams hire trainers and coaches. The Gretzkys and Crosbys and Drydens don't get to be "those who can do" all by themselves.


CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.