#1
So I know the phrygian dominant scale [basically a phrygian mode with a sharpened 3rd], but what makes a scale "dominant"?
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#2
correct me if I'm wrong, but to be dominant should mean it contains a flattened 7th (think of a dominant 7 chord).
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#3
It should have a Major third P5 and a minor seventh in it.
You can also make a dominant major scale which would be in C: C D E F G A Bb C
Others would say it's the mixolydian scale but this might get confusing with modal music, since it's mostly a rock cliché to make a b7 to get rid of the sweet sounding major seventh.
EDIT:Forgot to mention that the b7 tends to sound bluesy since it is used alot in blues think of minor pentatonics over a major chord.
Which brings me to the Dominant pentatonics, just minor pentatonics with a major third.
That might be worth foolin' around in.
Last edited by liampje at Oct 14, 2011,
#4
I think dominant scale means the fifth mode of an original scale, so in your case the fifth mode of a harmonic minor.
I think being the mixolydian mode makes it dominant.
Not sure if a sig is a necessity.
#5
A dominant scale only needs to have a 1 3 and b7. You'll find in different scales like harmonic minor, melodic minor, harmonic major that your scales may be different but you still have the dominant quality. Dominant chords resolve to the fifth down or fourth up and you'll find that in any given scale that these dominant scales have a tendency to want to resolve but stylistic one may choose not too. I'm sure people on here may wanna share examples of songs that employ dominant scales. Anybody wanna give some examples?
#7
Quote by Requim13
A dominant scale only needs to have a 1 3 and b7. You'll find in different scales like harmonic minor, melodic minor, harmonic major that your scales may be different but you still have the dominant quality. Dominant chords resolve to the fifth down or fourth up and you'll find that in any given scale that these dominant scales have a tendency to want to resolve but stylistic one may choose not too. I'm sure people on here may wanna share examples of songs that employ dominant scales. Anybody wanna give some examples?

Do you like jazz?
Abomination of the fifth doesn't mean it isn't there.
It could also be Iaugm7, which isn't a dominant chord.
#8
Quote by Sean0913
I'd say the b2 perfect 5 major 3rd and b7, make it a combination of the Phrygian and Dominant 7 (using the major 3rd against the b7). The absence of the b5 eliminates that b2 being anything Locrian.

Best,

Sean



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#9
Learn your Bebop scales.
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#10
To my knowledge, there isn't really such thing as "dominant" as a normal description for a scale - it's normally used to refer to a chord. I believe it's simply the case that "phrygian dominant" (the 5th mode of harmonic minor) is called that by some because a dominant 7th chord is naturally formed from it at the root.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Oct 15, 2011,
#11
Dominant refers to the V of a Key. But many people use the term Dominant when explaining the 7th type chord or the extended chords consisting of a Major triad and a b7.

The term seems interchangeable in most cases but when talking about backpedaling through the cycle of fourths it might be confusing if you are using the term for the movement, or the function, or chord formula name.

All "dominant" scales should have R, M3, and b7 common between them.
Last edited by MikeDodge at Oct 15, 2011,
#12
Quote by Brainpolice2
To my knowledge, there isn't really such thing as "dominant" as a normal description for a scale - it's normally used to refer to a chord. I believe it's simply the case that "phrygian dominant" (the 5th mode of harmonic minor) is called that by some because a dominant 7th chord is naturally formed from it at the root.

This is the basic logic...
Major 3rd P5 and minor 7 from the scales root note= dominant scale.
#13
Oh I get it now. So basically there needs to be dominant seventh chord with the tonic as the first note. Cheers guys.
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#14
Quote by Woffelz
Oh I get it now. So basically there needs to be dominant seventh chord with the tonic as the first note. Cheers guys.

Yes that's pretty much 100% correct .
#15
the tritone formed between the third and seventh, which wants to lead to the third and root of the corresponding I chord. thats what makes a chord/scale dominant.
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#17
Quote by tehREALcaptain
the tritone formed between the third and seventh, which wants to lead to the third and root of the corresponding I chord. thats what makes a chord/scale dominant.


Only response in this thread worth reading. Closing the tritone between the 3rd and 7th of a dominant chord to the root and 3rd of the corresponding major is what defines a chord as dominant. The rest of it literally does not matter

You can substitute other chords, like diminished chords, to serve dominant function however

Oh yea, OP, your much better off thinking of your "phrygian dominant" scale as a half-whole diminished minus the "minor third" and the "augmented fourth." Those are in quotes because theres no technically correct way to label the notes of an octatonic scale using diatonic terms
Last edited by chantastic at Oct 16, 2011,
#18
Quote by Sean0913
Really?

OK, so what is a Minor 7th then?

Best,

Sean

Minor 7th is 11 half steps away from your root note.
EDIT:But wath has that to do with a dominant scale?
Last edited by liampje at Oct 16, 2011,
#19
Quote by liampje
Minor 7th is 11 half steps away from your root note.
EDIT:But wath has that to do with a dominant scale?
11?
#20
As the captain said, the combination of the major third and minor seventh, making the tonic 7th a dominant 7th.