#1
Consider me as dumb, idiot student learning guitar wanting to know all about 'Time Signature', tell me what it is and how to determine it as in case of a song? Your help will be really appreciated!
#2
I'll try to make it short, so here we go...
4:4 is the most common time signature. In a 4:4 measure it's room for 4 quarter notes. (a quarter note = 1:4).
3:4 is simply a measure that's 1:4 less than 4:4 (a quarter note less). Sometimes it's used in 4:4 songs to create an off-beat feel, or simply just make a 3:4 song.
2:4 is obviously half as short as a 4:4 measure... not much more to say than that.
You get the point... hopefully.
There is much other time signatures, but I'm not experienced with those...

Edit: By the way, I know I mistyped at first, but now I fixed it.
Last edited by JB95 at Oct 14, 2011,
#3
Quote by JB95
I'll try to make it short, so here we go...
4:4 is the most common time signature. In a 4:4 measure you can have a whole note, which lasts through the whole measure. (4:4 a whole, obviously).
4:3 is simply a measure that's 4:1 less than 4:4. Sometimes it's used in 4:4 songs to create an off-beat feel, or simply just make a 3:4 song.
4:2 is obviously half as short as a 4:4 measure... not much more to say than that.
There is much other time signatures, but I'm not experienced with those...

Please ignore almost everything that is written above. I hate to be quite so harsh, but it is mostly plain wrong. (4/3?!)
#4
in the signature the top number (or left in this case) is the number of beats in a measure. the bottom is which note gets one beat.
4/4 means 4 beats in one measure with a quarter note getting one beat (because the 4 on bottom =1/4 or quarter note)
3/4 would be 3 beats per measure with quarter note as one beat
6/8 would be 6 beats per measure with an eighth note recieving one beat
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#5
Quote by theknuckster
Please ignore almost everything that is written above. I hate to be quite so harsh, but it is mostly plain wrong. (4/3?!)

I mistyped, and I have changed it.
No reason to say my comment is wrong when you don't correct me at all.
#6
Short summary of what time signatures is:

The upper number shows how many notes of the bottom number is played in one measure.
#7
^I hate to nitpick (well, not really) but the top number isn't really how many beats there are. Yo can kind of look at it that way, but really the top number is how many of the rhythmic values described in the lower number (8th notes for x/8, quarter notes for x/4 etc.) there are in a bar. So for 6/8 there are 6 8th notes, but there are only two metric beats (1 2 3 4 5 6)
#8
Quote by RAJIV ROCKZ
Consider me as dumb, idiot student learning guitar wanting to know all about 'Time Signature', tell me what it is and how to determine it as in case of a song? Your help will be really appreciated!


In a piece of music, the time signature denotes the beat of the song. Most pop and rock songs use common times such as 4/4, 3/4, and 2/4. You might have heard someone say something along the lines of, " And one and two and three and four." All throughout a song. This is 4/4 timing. 4 quarter notes or 8 eighth notes, or 16 sixteenth notes. This diagram can help you out for note quantity.




There is info all over UG on time signatures. Check some of them out for further reference.
#9
Quote by JB95
I mistyped, and I have changed it.
No reason to say my comment is wrong when you don't correct me at all.

I apologise. I should have been a bit more constructive with my criticism and provided my own answer, yes, and I'm sorry I didn't. I don't mean to come across as a tosser!
#10
doode the upper number shows how many of the lower number is to be played. for ex:

6/8. in this time signature there is going to be six 8th notes per mesure.

16/17 there is going to be sixteen 17th notes per mesure.

a C means 4/4 time signature

2/2 means there is going to be two white notes per mesure witch means youre going to play twice as fast as 4/4.
#11
Quote by white_ibanez10
16/17 there is going to be sixteen 17th notes per mesure.

I'm sure that you meant 17/16 contains seventeen 16th notes worth of value, unless you're really into incorporating irrational meters within your music.
#12
Quote by RAJIV ROCKZ
Consider me as dumb, idiot student learning guitar wanting to know all about 'Time Signature', tell me what it is and how to determine it as in case of a song? Your help will be really appreciated!


The most common time signatures are: 4/4, 3/4, and 6/8 or 12/8.

"C" or "common time is also 4/4. However usually "C" time is presented with a line drawn through the "C". This is "cut time" and what it indicates is the beat is a bit too fast to keep with your foot, using one tap per beat. Thus, cut time is tapped out once every other beat. 4/4 is also known as "march time". Every march you've ever heard employs it.

3/4 time is commonly called "waltz time", as the dance is performed solely using this meter. It usually jumps out at you when it's being used. Many country songs commonly utilize 3/4 time. It's very simple really, one, two, three, one, two, three...

6/8 and 12/8 times are in 1/8 notes, and oftentimes songs in these time signatures have a "triplet" feel. The notes are in sets of three, and can be counted off by saying "trip-o-let". Groups of three...da,da,da....da,da,da...da,da,da....and so forth.
#14
Quote by Guitar Sushi
If you want an example of odd time signatures, check my lesson my youtube channel.
I think Jethro Tull was sort of notorious for using odd time signatures between "movements".