#1
Hey peeps. I'm in a band, as the main songwriter/vocalist.. and the way i write is usually with a guitar in which i write the chords, sing the melody and lyrics, i don't actually write any lead guitar parts afterwards, and i find it hard to actually write a song with just lead guitar parts. But i'm a rhythm guitarist anyway. Problem is, my band has trouble writing lead guitar parts over my songs.. It isn't the chord formations are too complex, because they're quite simple it's just we can't really come up with anything. Do you guys have any tips on how to write good lead guitar over rhythm guitar? Thanks a bunch
#4
listen to some of the bands that influence you and try to emulate the vibe of their lead guitar, then add your own twist to it, good luck man!!
#6
Quote by Youriguitar
listen to iron maiden


As bad-ass iron maiden are.. i don't think you're really getting what i mean.

I write the rhythm guitar, so we've got that part.

We just need little licks or so here and there i think..
#7
the easiest(and prolly most limited) way IMHO would be figure out what chord progression you are using, Then just use that scale for simple leads.

let's say it's a D minor progression. just use the D harmonic minor and see how it feels.
Guitars:
LTD Alexi-600 White & Black
LTD Alexi-200 Black(Death Adder pickup & Gold OFR)
Agile Interceptor Pro 727 7-string
Jackson JS30RR rhoads
Jackson DKMGT
Squire telecaster

amps:
Bugera 6262 212 loaded with WGS veteran 30's
#8
Quote by stonedhippos
what genre do you guys play: hard rock, metal, rock, alternative, etc?


We play sort of alternative rock, sounds like the arctic monkeys/the strokes/the beatles with our own little scottish twist on it, ha.
#9
Figure out what key your in.

For A Basic Example:
If you take the chords:
C G Am F

I know that those chords are in C Major.

So i will either play the notes from the C Major scale over those chords or more likely the Am pentatonic scale.

Very simple way of looking at it if you just want basic guildlines.
#10
Quote by SumFX
Figure out what key your in.

For A Basic Example:
If you take the chords:
C G Am F

I know that those chords are in C Major.

So i will either play the notes from the C Major scale over those chords or more likely the Am pentatonic scale.

Very simple way of looking at it if you just want basic guildlines.


Alright, i see, yeah that's the way i've always sort of though about writing lead. It's just that most of our band, don't really know any literal music theory, we just sort of play what sounds good, if you know what i mean? Like you always imagine a good blues guitarist to do.
#11
Quote by Pregowski92
Alright, i see, yeah that's the way i've always sort of though about writing lead. It's just that most of our band, don't really know any literal music theory, we just sort of play what sounds good, if you know what i mean? Like you always imagine a good blues guitarist to do.


Right! well theres your problem my friend.

All great Blues guitarists actually know basic theory, most blues is based in the Minor pentatonic.

Do yourself a favour and learn a little bit of theory, it will help you so much when writing chord progressions and lead parts/solos.

And best of all, it's not that hard to grasp! Obviously the deeper you go into theory the harder it gets but the basics is just....well basic.
#12
The best thing would prob be to look at the chords and use that as a basis.

Maybe use one of the vocal melodies as a theme for the solo?
#13
Have you tried composing lead lines the same way you compose the melodies that you sing? Try playing the melodies that you sing on your guitar, and see what you can come up with while messing around. Lead lines should be extensions of the vocal melody anyways.
#14
If you can sing a melody, you can write a melody. Writing 'lead guitar' isn't much different from singing melodies apart from the fact that some melodies are unsingable because of the range or because there are too many notes to articulate in a certain space.
#15
As a long term goal, learn the major,mel,penta, scales and the modes.
you will know exactly what sounds harmonically perfect over any chord .