#1
today i decided to oil up my guitar bridge because it looked dull and faded. to do that i loosened up my strings and pulled the pins out from them bridge at took the ball ends out. then once i was putting the strings back through the bridge holes, i noticed that the ball ends were in a verticle position not horizontal as most are. so then i just tuned up the string but then i noticed the action of my strings slightly went up. what should i do? will this ruin my guitar? thank you.
#2
I dont think it'll ruin it. Your description seems a bit unclear. What kind of bridge is on your guitar?
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#3
what do you mean what kind of bridge? its a ibanez IJV50 if that helps.
#4
Did you use the same guage strings?

The position of the ball doesn't really matter at all.

Also, no. You cannot ruin your guitar by simply changing strings.
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#5
@captivate: i used the same exact strings i had on before and when i was tightening them up i heard like the wood make a tightening/stretching noise
#6
You actually tend to ruin strings rather than the guitar, by loosening and re-tightening them to do service work on the guitar. (Such as action height, oiling the fingerboard, polishing frets).

With that said, you're supposed to change one string at a time. IMHO, that's a bit histrionic and paranoid. Besides the operations I already mentioned require all the strings to be off or severely loosened anyway.

Keep in mind this is in the perspective of gently loosening all the strings, and not taking a pair of side cutters, and simply cutting through them. Please don't try that at home.

What you should do when restringing an acoustic, is to place a mild "fish hook" bend, into the ball end of the string. This enables you to place the ball forward in the pin hole and under the bridge itself. Then you make certain to route the string in the pin grove while inserting the bridge pins. This assures you that the ball is locked in it's proper location, and the string rides freely in the pin groove, making getting in tune, and staying in tune, a snap.
#7
Quote by Captaincranky
With that said, you're supposed to change one string at a time. IMHO, that's a bit histrionic and paranoid.


You can take off all your strings and leave them off for months and your guitar will be fine. It really isn't necessary at all to do one at a time.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#8
Quote by captivate
You can take off all your strings and leave them off for months and your guitar will be fine. It really isn't necessary at all to do one at a time.
You do agree that there's plenty of urban legend to the contrary to be found? I always mention it since I keep running into at "reputable" sites. I never practice it that way myself, since I always take all the strings off to clean and polish the fingerboard and headstock before putting the new strings on.

I suppose a "perfect storm" of low humidity and heavy strings could conceivably do damage to an acoustic. But a solid body electric, never gonna happen.
#9
^ There's plenty of "urban legend" behind it. Doesn't make it true in any way though. I'm quite certain that any good luthier will tell you the same thing--it doesn't make any difference how you change strings.
Equipment:
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- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#10
My dad's Yamaha FG360 didn't have strings for 16 years and I finally threw some on there and it was fine. Hope that helps.
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#11
you can gouge your bridge plate by putting the ball ends wrong - i've seen some bridge plates on older guitars that were worn all the way through.
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#12
Quote by patticake
you can gouge your bridge plate by putting the ball ends wrong - i've seen some bridge plates on older guitars that were worn all the way through.
If I started to run into a problem like this, I'd probably wick some thin CyA adhesive into the ball contact area. CyA makes wood as hard as steel, and I doubt if putting it into such a small area would have any discernible impact on the sound. It might save the guitar, or at least a big repair bill.