#1
Is it okay to learn only the basics of a solo, and improvise the fast parts? Does this kind of solo-learning help me becoming a better player or does this have the opposite effect? Is it better to learn it note after note?

EDIT: I've asked another question at the bottom of the page.
Last edited by Yekex at Oct 19, 2011,
#2
Well it depends on what you consider a "better player".
If i were you i would learn the solo first note by note then once I can play it
with ease i would start improvising parts.
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#3
Before you become a faster player, you have to become a cleaner, more accurate player. Something slow and clean sound a whole lot better than something fast and messy.
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#4
The best way I think is to slow it down get the notes down. Also any time you have fast solos or riffs there will be pull offs and hammer downs. Learn these well and this will come easier. I would also include what the guy above me said.
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#5
I don't think it's a good idea to 'learn guitar' by learning solos. You can play any solo you like if you have the techniques it uses already up to speed. Then a solo takes about 30 min to learn and master, cause all of the technical side is already taken care of. You need to separate technical practice and learning guitar from learning solos, they are two totally different things.
#7
Quote by Yekex
Is it okay to learn only the basics of a solo, and improvise the fast parts? Does this kind of solo-learning help me becoming a better player or does this have the opposite effect? Is it better to learn it note after note?

From a technical standpoint, it's important to learn to play fast parts cleanly. Fast parts in a solo are the best exercises out there, since they have musical context and use a variety of techniques that you might not be equally good at. Learning to play them note for note can be very helpful to learning to play more technical music.

It's also really good if you can improvise solos well. That shows that you have a good understanding of how to listen to a chord progression and play something interesting and musical over it as opposed to something that's just straight speed.

So, in short, it's good to be able to do both. Just make sure that before you go for speed, you go for relaxation and economy of motion. Those are the key elements of speed.
#8
I find that if I improv on a solo that was written by someone else, I'll tend to play stuff that I find is easier for me to play, or play something that I am familiar with. I think sometimes, learning a song or a solo note for note like the original can challenge you to play stuff outside of your comfort zone, as opposed to improv-ing, and most likely playing something that is easier for you to play.
#9
This is kind of an individual thing just like how people learn subjects in school differently. Some people learn best by doing, some by hearing, and some by reading. Maybe you should pick two songs and do it both ways. Learn to play the solo note for note with one, and then improv on the other. Practice for a few days then record yourself and play it back. That way you'll be able to hear the difference in what is working or not for you.
#10
Quote by zincabopataurio
I find that if I improv on a solo that was written by someone else, I'll tend to play stuff that I find is easier for me to play, or play something that I am familiar with. I think sometimes, learning a song or a solo note for note like the original can challenge you to play stuff outside of your comfort zone, as opposed to improv-ing, and most likely playing something that is easier for you to play.

I agree with this post. If you Improve I've the hardest parts, you aren't learning anything! I say learn the solo note for note as best you can. This will benefit your technique most IMHO.
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#13
I rarely learn solos note for note. I only learn licks of a solo that I like and improvise the rest. I'd only learn a solo note for note if it was a really good solo.
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#14
leran it note for note,i dont play lead much but when i want to learn a solo,i learn it in sections,really slow then build pace up.
#15
make your own solo and compare it to the solo you whant to learn, if it doesnt sound as good then slowly go threw both and compare them and see what naeeds improving
#16
I don't want to start a new thread so I'll ask here:
What would you do if the band that you're in wants to learn hard rock songs which have hard solos? The other parts are easy compared to the solos, so I always feel like I have to work 2-3 times more than they do and at the end of the day, I'm the one who's the lazy asshole because I "can't learn the solos properly".
I think it's unfair, does a band usually accept that the lead guitarist needs more time to learn his parts? How does this usually go?
Last edited by Yekex at Oct 19, 2011,
#17
Quote by Yekex
I don't want to start a new thread so I'll ask here:
What would you do if the band that you're in wants to learn hard rock songs which have hard solos? The other parts are easy compared to the solos, so I always feel like I have to work 2-3 times more than they do and at the end of the day, I'm the one who's the lazy asshole because I "can't learn the solos properly".
I think it's unfair, does a band usually accept that the lead guitarist needs more time to learn his parts? How does this usually go?

well your supposed to start a new thread, it wont kill you... what your doing is hijacking this thread and then the poster wont get any more answers cause you just started a new one within his
#18
Quote by Yekex
I don't want to start a new thread so I'll ask here:
What would you do if the band that you're in wants to learn hard rock songs which have hard solos? The other parts are easy compared to the solos, so I always feel like I have to work 2-3 times more than they do and at the end of the day, I'm the one who's the lazy asshole because I "can't learn the solos properly".
I think it's unfair, does a band usually accept that the lead guitarist needs more time to learn his parts? How does this usually go?

Sorry, but that's the lead guitarist's role- to play lead guitar. If you can't do that, there's no shame in just playing rhythm instead, but as a lead guitarist, you're expected to play solos. But it comes with some prestige, too- you get to say that you're the guy ripping those insane solos, not anyone else in the band.
Hope it helps.
#19
Quote by Cavalcade
Sorry, but that's the lead guitarist's role- to play lead guitar. If you can't do that, there's no shame in just playing rhythm instead, but as a lead guitarist, you're expected to play solos. But it comes with some prestige, too- you get to say that you're the guy ripping those insane solos, not anyone else in the band.
Hope it helps.

you forgot to check his spelling
#20
Quote by NewYngwie
well your supposed to start a new thread, it wont kill you... what your doing is hijacking this thread and then the poster wont get any more answers cause you just started a new one within his


I'm the OP and I got the answers I wanted

Quote by Cavalcade
Sorry, but that's the lead guitarist's role- to play lead guitar. If you can't do that, there's no shame in just playing rhythm instead, but as a lead guitarist, you're expected to play solos. But it comes with some prestige, too- you get to say that you're the guy ripping those insane solos, not anyone else in the band.
Hope it helps.


I see your point, and I'm working hard to play the fast solos, but it's simply a fact that learning a hard solo is like learning another song inside a song. And it is a bit annoying that when I f*ck up, it's like a disaster, but when somebody else makes a mistake, it's normal.
Last edited by Yekex at Oct 19, 2011,
#21
Quote by Yekex
I'm the OP and I got the answers I wanted


I see your point, and I'm working hard to play the fast solos, but it's simply a fact that learning a hard solo is like learning another song inside a song. And it is a bit annoying that when I f*ck up, it's like a disaster, but when somebody else makes a mistake, it's normal.

Wait a second. Why aren't you writing the solos? Just come up with something you can play. Unless you're a cover band, if you are, just ignore me.
#22
Quote by Cavalcade
Wait a second. Why aren't you writing the solos? Just come up with something you can play. Unless you're a cover band, if you are, just ignore me.

well he COULD take the solo's and edit them to his liking to where they sound good and are comfortable to play but im probly wrong like always
#23
Quote by Cavalcade
Wait a second. Why aren't you writing the solos? Just come up with something you can play. Unless you're a cover band, if you are, just ignore me.


We aren't a cover band, but we are learning other bands' songs first to just play together. When they're expecting you to learn the 40 year old Slash's solos, it's a bit funny.

Quote by NewYngwie
well he COULD take the solo's and edit them to his liking to where they sound good and are comfortable to play but im probly wrong like always


I don't think you're wrong. It helps to learn hard solos perfectly, but that takes a lot of time.
#24
Quote by Yekex
We aren't a cover band, but we are learning other bands' songs first to just play together. When they're expecting you to learn the 40 year old Slash's solos, it's a bit funny.

Well then, you don't need to learn them perfectly. Like NewYngwie said, you can change them slightly to make them easier to play, but if you're going to change part of it, why not just come up with something completely new?
If you're going to play original material at some point, and you're the lead guitarist, you'll probably have to learn to write (or improvise) solos yourself, sooner or later, so why not start now? Start simple (maybe really simple), and if they don't like you doing your own thing, sucks to be them, because you're the lead guitarist. That's what you're supposed to do- you're a guitarist that plays leads. They'll just have to suck it up.
Give 'em hell.
Last edited by Cavalcade at Oct 19, 2011,
#25
Quote by aeromakesmusic
Well it depends on what you consider a "better player".
If i were you i would learn the solo first note by note then once I can play it
with ease i would start improvising parts.

This
#26
In response to the thread's title question, the correct answer is "slowly"

As for your second question, yes, lead guitar parts can be tricky...but if you want to be the lead guitarist in your band, put in the work and learn it. It'll pay off.