#1
Sorry for the troll-ish title. Of course it makes a difference. I am just curious as to the results of those who have experimented with the same pickup in different guitars and vice versa. I.E. can some tonewood make a good pickup sound bad.

I put a pair of GFS mean 90 pickups (very cheap PUs) into a guitar that is apparently made out of plywood. This is obviously a very cheaply constructed guitar. Against all odds, it sounds fantastic. It is the tightest, clearest sounding guitar I have owned or played. It's as if the cheap thin wood isn't there to affect the pickups or add any unnecessary mud. The lack of bass is apparent, which you would think is bad, but is not by any means. It still sounds bigger and thicker than strat-like guitar I have, just with less bass, if that makes sense.

I am looking to upgrade these pickups into a higher quality guitar, but I do not want to mud up the pickups at all.

So is a nice, clear sounding pickup going to sound like such in any guitar, or should I be careful?
#7
This concrete test?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F2SHlfB8YE

We don't know if it's the same bridge, neck, and pups.

Also, if they used the amp in the picture, it's an MG!!!

I got one of those (a lower wattage model) and all my guitars sound the same on it--you can hardly tell the difference between single coils and humbuckers on an MG. But on my tube Marshall it's night and day between all my guitars.

The only 2 that sound close are my mahagany Schecter Avenger (with an SD SH-8) and my alder Squier Affinity Strat (with a DD HB-108--cheap copy of the SH-8).

The Squier sounds nothing like my alder MIA Strat with stock SSS pups. And my mahagany Ibanez with stock DiMarzio D-Activators sounds nothing like my mahagany Schecter. The basswood RG777 re-issue with stock DiMarzio/Ibanez pups sounds unique, as does the poplar Mustang with stock single coils.

The Mustang is the only short scale, but it sounds a lot like a telecaster--I think due to the barrel bridge saddles.

Wonder how different the concrete guitar and the other would sound on a decent amp?
#8
Quote by jetwash69
This concrete test?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F2SHlfB8YE

We don't know if it's the same bridge, neck, and pups.

Also, if they used the amp in the picture, it's an MG!!!

I got one of those (a lower wattage model) and all my guitars sound the same on it--you can hardly tell the difference between single coils and humbuckers on an MG. But on my tube Marshall it's night and day between all my guitars.

The only 2 that sound close are my mahagany Schecter Avenger (with an SD SH-8) and my alder Squier Affinity Strat (with a DD HB-108--cheap copy of the SH-8).

The Squier sounds nothing like my alder MIA Strat with stock SSS pups. And my mahagany Ibanez with stock DiMarzio D-Activators sounds nothing like my mahagany Schecter. The basswood RG777 re-issue with stock DiMarzio/Ibanez pups sounds unique, as does the poplar Mustang with stock single coils.

The Mustang is the only short scale, but it sounds a lot like a telecaster--I think due to the barrel bridge saddles.

Wonder how different the concrete guitar and the other would sound on a decent amp?

I never said it was an accurate representation. I just thought it was cool. And that ain't a bad clean tone by any means, even if it is an MG.
#9
Yes it does.

To a new player it doesn't.

If you're tuning in E Standard and clean, it's very important.

If you're tuning to Drop A# and using lot's of distortion, it's not.
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#10
Quote by Eppicurt

If you're tuning in E Standard and clean, it's very important.

If you're tuning to Drop A# and using lot's of distortion, it's not.


Gotta disagree with this. It always matters. It always makes a difference.

But at the same time, I have to say try not to worry too much about this. At the end of the day, just try to find a guitar that sounds the way you want it to.
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#11
I think to the average metal players ear, having that much saturation and distortion you'd be hard pressed to have a noticeable difference between a guitar with exact same specs but with a different timber.

I'm not saying it doesn't, I'm just saying it's not as important.
Quote by SimplyBen
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#12
I don't know what constitutes the average ear, but I can hear the differences between all of my guitars equipped with the same EMG's through my Vypyr modeling amp.

So yeah.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#13
And I'm just saying that not everyone can and to certain genres it wouldn't be as important.

Would you have not bought any of your guitars with the exact same specs, same playability, just because it used alder instead of mahogany? Keeping in mind I'm talking about people who constantly use distortion.
For a lot of metal I don't think wood type should be as big a factor for picking a guitar as the pickups and the amp is
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NakedInTheRain aka "Naked with shriveled pencil sized bacon In The Rain"
Last edited by Eppicurt at Oct 16, 2011,
#14
Well personally, I'm a huge EMG enthusiast, I love having that flat tonal pallet to work with, especially since my amp is a modeler. So I take different tonewoods wherever I can, because that's the little bit of flavor my guitars have.

I do agree that the amp and pickups do make a lot more of a difference than the wood. But, I think that is the case, regardless of the genre. I don't see why metal has to be singled out.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#15
Quote by Offworld92
Well personally, I'm a huge EMG enthusiast, I love having that flat tonal pallet to work with, especially since my amp is a modeler. So I take different tonewoods wherever I can, because that's the little bit of flavor my guitars have.

I do agree that the amp and pickups do make a lot more of a difference than the wood. But, I think that is the case, regardless of the genre. I don't see why metal has to be singled out.

I agree. I doubt the plywood in my guitar is benefiting my tone, but it sounds great. And I play low gain and clean.
#16
Personally I think genres that require clean a lot of the time requires a lot more careful thought into the types of timber they're going to be using as it resonates more through a cleaner signal on the amp. The dirtier and dirtier the signal gets, you get more and more of a loss of the "true" resonance. Typically, metal uses a high gained distortion most of the time and such a loss of the tonality from the timbre occurs.

I'm not arguing that it doesn't, of course it does. But I wouldn't be too concerned about timber for my shredding/metal guitars as much as I was concerned with timber my strat and my tele was made out of which doesn't get to see a lot of dirt too often.
Quote by SimplyBen
That's the advantage of being such a distance from Yianni. I can continue to live my life without fear of stumbling upon his dark terror.


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NakedInTheRain aka "Naked with shriveled pencil sized bacon In The Rain"
#17
Quote by Robfreitag

Holy shit there was a clear difference. To be honest, I've always been able to say that this guitar sounds way different to that, but this was the first time I could definitely tell that this one was alder and the other one was basswood.

I actually thought the basswood sounded a tad better. What did you guys think?