#1
So I'm a music student and found myself in the school band as rhythm guitarist. Unfortunately, they mostly do reggae songs and I'm not really into the reggae genre (strictly punk rock TBH) and I'm a stranger to a lot of the playing techniques. Basically I'm just getting the hang of muting in time with the beat and I usually use my palm to do it. My guitar teacher tells me I should be using my fret hand for muting in reggae, though. Does it matter? :/ I find it so much harder to get the same effect and I feel like he's just picking at minor details since it's not like I'll ever be doing it outside of the school band.

Bottom line : Is there any specific reason to bother with fret hand muting or can I just get by with what I'm good at? (using the palm of my strumming hand)
Ibanez GRG170DX
Line 6 Spider IV 15
#3
No, voice the chords. You'll get a more defined rhythm without having to worry about stupid harmonics.
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Ibanez ARX 350
Dunlop 535Q
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#4
Quote by kaoticnick
So I'm a music student and found myself in the school band as rhythm guitarist. Unfortunately, they mostly do reggae songs and I'm not really into the reggae genre (strictly punk rock TBH) and I'm a stranger to a lot of the playing techniques. Basically I'm just getting the hang of muting in time with the beat and I usually use my palm to do it. My guitar teacher tells me I should be using my fret hand for muting in reggae, though. Does it matter? :/ I find it so much harder to get the same effect and I feel like he's just picking at minor details since it's not like I'll ever be doing it outside of the school band.

Bottom line : Is there any specific reason to bother with fret hand muting or can I just get by with what I'm good at? (using the palm of my strumming hand)

Yes, it does matter, playing stylistically is very important, and to make it sound authentic you need respect the techniques used, and tone required. Try and adopt an almost bouncing motion with the fingers, and only play triad shapes on the top 3 strings. If you struggle with finding the shapes, the C A G E D system is worth learning.

The fretting hand should, in fact, press so lightly on the fretboard, that if you were to turn your amp right down to 0, the notes wouldn't actually be audible from the guitar.

I understand that you think it's pointless to learn, as you won't be doing it outside of school, but it's good to explore other techniques and styles / genres. You never know, and versatility isn't a bad thing.
Last edited by mdc at Oct 17, 2011,