#1
So do you think due to how easy it is to access so much information on the internet, the current and upcoming guitarists (and other musicians, I guess) will be better (subjective, I know, just answer the damn question, smartass ) than previous generations?

I think they'll lose a lot of creativity. Classic rock/ blues guitarists and anyone who grew up without the internet pretty much had to do a lot by ear, which will make them better than just learning from tabs.

But, with access to so much information, their knowledge of theory and other genres could increase massively compared to what it used to be.

Your thoughts?
#2
I dunno I mean when i try to learn guitar online I end up distra...


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#5
Quote by Tangerineseeker
I doubt that because people have the possibility to learn more that they will actually learn more.

Well, it's known that Hendrix always had a guitar with him. Keith Richards used to stay up for days on end just playing and working out every blues standard he could.

If you had people with that mentality today, with the resources available now, would they be better than a like minded person 40/ 50 years ago? That's what I'm getting at.
#6
I've been playing for 30 years and for most of that time all learning was either through books, lessons or friends (yes, I just said this on another thread somewhere). For years the only real scale I knew was the major scale because some guy I knew showed it to me once. And my playing got to a certain point and stopped progressing.

But now, with all the information that's available online and all the software and videos etc. my playing is definitely a lot better. Even the improv. Because now I know like at least 4 more scales!

If you have the creativity then you have it and nothing's going to change that. The additional tools and knowledge you can look up online means the potential is there to put that creativity to much better use.
Last edited by Spud Spudly at Oct 17, 2011,
#7
I love the internet, it has spawned a resource for music theory for free that you would have otherwise spent a lifetime and a lot of money hunting down and learning. Though there is stuff that makes it look like learning guitar is as easy as eating with a fork and knife! Then again thats ok cause it makes the used effect pedal and guitar market a little more ample.
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#8
I don't really agree on the creativity part.. However I do believe that there's going to be a big risk that people are going to be a bit too un-sure of what they actually can do and not, and relies too much on the words of another person instead of playing just what they want.

Also, the risk of distraction is enormous... Like from forums like these, if one should be frank.
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#9
Quote by WholeLottaIzzy
Well, it's known that Hendrix always had a guitar with him. Keith Richards used to stay up for days on end just playing and working out every blues standard he could.

If you had people with that mentality today, with the resources available now, would they be better than a like minded person 40/ 50 years ago? That's what I'm getting at.


Well in that case I think definitely yeah. I mean a person with the same mentality but more available resources should be "better" than a person with less resources. But since every person has a different personality and mentality, you can't really apply this to everyone in the world.
#10
Not really when you actually look at the guitarists of previous generations... Yngwie malmsteem, Michael angelo batio, van halen, slash etc. etc.

Also the vast majority of guitar lesson online tend to pretty lame. There are only a few good ones and they tend to be aimed at beginer guitarists so anyone looking to advance beyond beginer becomes rather stuck.
#11
TThere was an interview on the main page a while back where the guy said the worst invention ever was the digital tuner, because before that was available everybody used to be able to tune by ear. Now, people can't do it.

He'd probably agree with you, and I can see the point, but I think the internet has helped me more than it's hindered me.
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#12
Quote by GaryBillington
TThere was an interview on the main page a while back where the guy said the worst invention ever was the digital tuner, because before that was available everybody used to be able to tune by ear. Now, people can't do it.

He'd probably agree with you, and I can see the point, but I think the internet has helped me more than it's hindered me.

Don't believe for a minute that everybody was able to tune by ear.

All you had was a lot of out of tune instruments. I know how to tune by ear but it sounds a lot better when I use a tuner.
#13
Internet provides the guitarist with the POTENTIAL and a POSSIBILITY to become greater than the masters of old. However, it is very rare to find the mentality of those masters.

Luckily, I play as much as I can and I'm thankful that I have the internet which gave me the ability to progress very fast in music.

It also greatly helps with songwriting, not internet-related, but guitar pro is a great writing tool.
#14
Quote by GaryBillington
TThere was an interview on the main page a while back where the guy said the worst invention ever was the digital tuner, because before that was available everybody used to be able to tune by ear. Now, people can't do it.

He'd probably agree with you, and I can see the point, but I think the internet has helped me more than it's hindered me.

If I have a reference, I can tune my guitar by ear. Like, tune the low e to a piano and then tune the guitar to the low e.

I do think that the amount of information on the internet is kinda overwhelming at times. I have gone to learn some theory before and you get so much thrown at you, I just don't know what's good to know. Well, it's obviously all good to know, but there are lots of things that will be much better to know than others.
Last edited by WholeLottaIzzy at Oct 17, 2011,
#15
Quote by WholeLottaIzzy
If I have a reference, I can tune my guitar by ear. Like, tune the low e to a piano and then tune the guitar to the low e.



How would you tune the low e piano then?
#16
Quote by Zeletros
How would you tune the low e piano then?

Electric piano

Or, I'd invest in a tuning key.
#17
I know back in the day ppl had to learn songs by ear often wearing out their records in the process from all the playback.

There's lots of theory info on the net. But I think it's still beneficial to have lessons in person. The net obviously helps but it's up to the person to take advantage of what is out there. Filter through what's useless or incorrect info as well.
#18
Internet might make it easier for some people to pick up a guitar and learn how to play a bit.
But mastering the guitar is the same as it always was.
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#19
Most of my guitar buddies have just learned tabs.
They have played about 2 years more than me, still they have a hard time telling the name of chords. When I said G major, they didn't know what the hell I was talking about.
It's sad actually... I used the internet to mainly learn music theory, unlike my friends, who just looked up tabs when they were in the mood for it.
At my old school I had a great music teacher. He was a blues guitarist, who was amazing at improvising and playing along with anything. He told me that he have never used the internet, and figured everything out by himself. Very inspiring man, even though I prefer playing metal.
All I need to say is that internet have many shortcuts, but also many stuff that's distracts you whcich end up leeping you from getting better.
#22
Guitarists are so much better now, it's not even comparable. I've seen 14 year old kids on youtube play better than any pro musician out there.
#23
Quote by Portuguese_boy
Guitarists are so much better now, it's not even comparable. I've seen 14 year old kids on youtube play better than any pro musician out there.

But they're probably Asian, so it doesn't count
#28
I spend more time on a guitar-related website than I spend actually playing guitar. Yet, if you were to ask me which activity I enjoy more, without a doubt I would say playing the instrument.

People like Hendrix and Keith Richards are not the norm of their generation, though. Today, there are still people who live music and bring technical abilities and creativity to the table that has never been heard previously. There will always be people like this. However, it requires great dedication and perhaps some innate talent. No matter what, there will always be people who push things to the next level. There will also always be people like me who love it, but will not necessarily dedicate their life to it.
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#29
Internet definetly gave me the jump start to get into playing. Watched YT How To video's, learned tabs, learned first scale - the obvious one, A-minor pentatonic. It also helps a lot in getting feedback on some of my playing plus general guitar information. So in that respect it's been great. I know all I know about guitars and playing them only because of the internet.

The downside is that due to the shiteload of info you can get, it's hard to get some sort of structure in what I want to learn. It would be great to take lessons and get feedback from an actual seasoned teacher, in a face to face manner. I also think it'll be easier to get into music theory then, as I find myself rather lacking in that department. Usually I end up thinking 'Oh, I'll go into this-and-that technique now and really practice it!" But then the next day I'll do something else and end up only scratching the surface of most techniques and styles.

So I guess my general conclusion is: definetly been a great help in getting me started and providing the material when I want it, but it lacks structure. I also feel I haven't learned some basics that someone with the same ammount of playing time as me picks up if he were to follow 'regular' lessons or a more structured learning plan. It's sort of random for me now.
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