#1
So i have been playing guitar for about 3 years now and ive been wanting to correct my picking technique and start picking with my wrist rather than with my elbow cause i have heard that in the long run it can mess with your arm. Anyways I usually anchor my hand and just pick with my wrist, but ill just sit there and practice hours upon hours day after day, and i dont seem to get any results. My left hand legato is great but i cant seem to get my right hand going, is there something im doing wrong, any tricks or techniques to help my situation, all help is appreciated,
Thanks
#2
Quote by Jhc2195
So i have been playing guitar for about 3 years now and ive been wanting to correct my picking technique and start picking with my wrist rather than with my elbow cause i have heard that in the long run it can mess with your arm. Anyways I usually anchor my hand and just pick with my wrist, but ill just sit there and practice hours upon hours day after day, and i dont seem to get any results. My left hand legato is great but i cant seem to get my right hand going, is there something im doing wrong, any tricks or techniques to help my situation, all help is appreciated,
Thanks


Probably that. Or you just have to give it some more time.
#3
Quote by Zeletros
Probably that. Or you just have to give it some more time.

I thought so too, but i see some pretty fast guitarists out there that anchor there hand so im not sure
#4
depends on how you anchor your hand.

I find that the problem for me is the timing on both hands is off slightly. Start slow and work your way to the fast speeds.


as far as anchoring your hand
some people consider it a bad habit, but I've seen vids of petrucci doing it and other guitarist that we call Gods. I'd say go find some practice material from paul gilbert. he seems to be the one that has a free floating hand the most, and his alternate picking is just beautiful.
#5
Quote by Jhc2195
So i have been playing guitar for about 3 years now and ive been wanting to correct my picking technique and start picking with my wrist rather than with my elbow cause i have heard that in the long run it can mess with your arm. Anyways I usually anchor my hand and just pick with my wrist, but ill just sit there and practice hours upon hours day after day, and i dont seem to get any results. My left hand legato is great but i cant seem to get my right hand going, is there something im doing wrong, any tricks or techniques to help my situation, all help is appreciated,
Thanks


personally, i play with my wrist 90% of the time. I only use my arm to tremolo pick when I am doing it REALLY fast, and I hardly ever have to do that. When it comes to anchoring, I used to do it all the time - but I taught myself to not do it anymore except when I feel I need some short term...stability?...when playing certain lines. (vague on purpose). But in the long run, non-anchoring is better in my opinion - I've seen quite a few threads which dive into the issue of anchor vs non-anchor; go searchbar.

With you not seeing progress...perhaps you're expecting to see results too quickly. Don't practice tremolo picking for 3 hours a day every day...it's kinda being wasteful of guitar practice time. What about other techniques? Guys who play super fast didn't achieve that speed overnight. Their speed is a result of years and years of hard practice. My guitar teacher, who is a jazz guitar virtuoso in my opinion and who has been practicing his instrument for 40+ years, always says, "Speed will come." And he's right. Start off slow with a metronome, build up speed from there. Have you ever tried to study a lot in one day and then tried to recall all that info a little later? I don't know about you, but it just doean't work - and I rate it's the same with guitar. It can be a bit of a "Hare and the Tortoise" scenario. I've been playing for about twice as long as you and I'm not a particularly speedy guitar player, and if I do play really fast my accuracy is compromised. The trick is to practice speed + accuracy hand in hand. And that would mean switching off that distortion channel and cranking up that clean channel (if you have been playing with tons of gain) because distortion covers up a lot of mistakes and smudged notes.

I think I went a little off-topic, I think I gotta sleep now
#6
Quote by kai29
depends on how you anchor your hand.

I find that the problem for me is the timing on both hands is off slightly. Start slow and work your way to the fast speeds.


as far as anchoring your hand
some people consider it a bad habit, but I've seen vids of petrucci doing it and other guitarist that we call Gods. I'd say go find some practice material from paul gilbert. he seems to be the one that has a free floating hand the most, and his alternate picking is just beautiful.

Ill basically just rest the base of my hand on the lower strings when im alternate picking, and i can play in sync, left hand is fast, right hand not so much. Most of the stuff i practice is paul gilbert due to the influence he has on me, play slow for hours upon hours and I only seem to be able to achieve the same speed at the end of each day
#7
Quote by UnmagicMushroom
personally, i play with my wrist 90% of the time. I only use my arm to tremolo pick when I am doing it REALLY fast, and I hardly ever have to do that. When it comes to anchoring, I used to do it all the time - but I taught myself to not do it anymore except when I feel I need some short term...stability?...when playing certain lines. (vague on purpose). But in the long run, non-anchoring is better in my opinion - I've seen quite a few threads which dive into the issue of anchor vs non-anchor; go searchbar.

With you not seeing progress...perhaps you're expecting to see results too quickly. Don't practice tremolo picking for 3 hours a day every day...it's kinda being wasteful of guitar practice time. What about other techniques? Guys who play super fast didn't achieve that speed overnight. Their speed is a result of years and years of hard practice. My guitar teacher, who is a jazz guitar virtuoso in my opinion and who has been practicing his instrument for 40+ years, always says, "Speed will come." And he's right. Start off slow with a metronome, build up speed from there. Have you ever tried to study a lot in one day and then tried to recall all that info a little later? I don't know about you, but it just doean't work - and I rate it's the same with guitar. It can be a bit of a "Hare and the Tortoise" scenario. I've been playing for about twice as long as you and I'm not a particularly speedy guitar player, and if I do play really fast my accuracy is compromised. The trick is to practice speed + accuracy hand in hand. And that would mean switching off that distortion channel and cranking up that clean channel (if you have been playing with tons of gain) because distortion covers up a lot of mistakes and smudged notes.

I think I went a little off-topic, I think I gotta sleep now

Its been a few months now and still no results, Im not expecting to be shredding with malmsteen within a matter of weeks, but it would nice to see a little increase in speed due to the amount of work and effort i put in
#8
Quote by Jhc2195
Its been a few months now and still no results, Im not expecting to be shredding with malmsteen within a matter of weeks, but it would nice to see a little increase in speed due to the amount of work and effort i put in


Sometimes improvement is better judged by someone other than yourself. Sometimes when I know I've practiced something really hard and then I feel that I suck at it - the improvement is there. Perhaps it small, but it's getting there until one day we surprise ourselves and say, "Since when can I do that?!"
Do you have a guitar teacher? Perhaps he or she will be able to give you some better direction than some random overtired person slurring over his keyboard. Or if you don't have one, perhaps it would be a good idea, or to even have a guitar mentor.
#9
Quote by UnmagicMushroom
Sometimes improvement is better judged by someone other than yourself. Sometimes when I know I've practiced something really hard and then I feel that I suck at it - the improvement is there. Perhaps it small, but it's getting there until one day we surprise ourselves and say, "Since when can I do that?!"
Do you have a guitar teacher? Perhaps he or she will be able to give you some better direction than some random overtired person slurring over his keyboard. Or if you don't have one, perhaps it would be a good idea, or to even have a guitar mentor.

Ive had success with being self taught, im not saying im too good for a mentor, im just saying its not in the cards financially and i like where im going, i just want to know if im doing anything wrong and if so what i can do to correct it
#10
You dont HAVE to anchor your hand, i dont and i find alternate picking at a fast pace as second nature but i do think that you picking hand should be supported in some way. For example i rest my ring and pinkie just under the highest string Whilst i play the low E keeping my picking fingers at a good distance from the strings. Its probably really bad from my fingers but it suits my playing style i think so i dont intend to change it
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#11
Quote by ajondunnfarmer
You dont HAVE to anchor your hand, i dont and i find alternate picking at a fast pace as second nature but i do think that you picking hand should be supported in some way. For example i rest my ring and pinkie just under the highest string Whilst i play the low E keeping my picking fingers at a good distance from the strings. Its probably really bad from my fingers but it suits my playing style i think so i dont intend to change it

Yeah i know what you mean, most of my desire to pick fast comes from guys like paul gilbert and yngwie malmsteen and i dont think they anchor so im at a point where Im not sure if I should continue picking how i have or to try to start over without anchoring
#12
I think if you've hit a speed wall look at the all the other things there are to right hand technique -

dynamic range
timing
tone
stamina
even speed across all pickstrokes

... work on those and you'll get a lot better at picking. You'll probably get faster too, if you don't concentrate on speed.
#13
Quote by Freepower
I think if you've hit a speed wall look at the all the other things there are to right hand technique -

dynamic range
timing
tone
stamina
even speed across all pickstrokes

... work on those and you'll get a lot better at picking. You'll probably get faster too, if you don't concentrate on speed.


Good advice.

I would also add that try to practice relaxed.

You should check my free ebook, especially the first 2 chapters as they cover the mental process and the physical process of speed.

Speed takes time, and it is better to work on developing a good technique at a low bpm rather then going as fast as you can at a bad technique