#1
So, I'm convinced to stop anchoring after some reading and I'm wondering how to go about it. I've heard that to make the transition easier, just practice playing unanchored for only a portion of your practice time at first, is this okay, or should I just play completely unanchored? Also, for the sake of learning to play without your hand being anchored, would it make sense to not do any right hand muting whilst practicing this? Any other tips or advice from anyone else who unlearned this habit?

Ps. please don't derail this thread into an anchor vs. no anchor thread, just don't.
Thanks in advance.
#2
I had to curl my fingers under into a fist to stop anchoring (at first: I keep my fingers loose now for chicken pickin', extra muting, and what-not), so that's my tip.

I would always practice playing with and without palm muting, to find the most comfortable way to navigate for yourself.
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#3
I would say when ever you have time even when your playing your guitar, put your hand in an unanchored position and sturm on your leg or something. Ie. The ” ok” hand sign. Not sure if that will translate ha
#4
Quote by TechIndustrial

Ps. please don't derail this thread into an anchor vs. no anchor thread, just don't.
Thanks in advance.


smart move xD

my hand looks totaly awkward when not anchoring but i still go at it. i can riff with ease but leads always slow me down when not anchoring
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#6
I've read the part about stopping anchoring, actually the initial thought of getting rid of the habit was from reading the whole section and I'll be applying that advice but it doesn't really address my two questions, especially since when i play with distortion, right hand muting is pretty much a must at all time so I was wondering for learning purposes maybe it would be better to practice with no right hand muting even though I will be playing most of the time with right hand muting which would be anchoring.
#7
Quote by TechIndustrial
I've read the part about stopping anchoring, actually the initial thought of getting rid of the habit was from reading the whole section and I'll be applying that advice but it doesn't really address my two questions, especially since when i play with distortion, right hand muting is pretty much a must at all time so I was wondering for learning purposes maybe it would be better to practice with no right hand muting even though I will be playing most of the time with right hand muting which would be anchoring.



Sorry I didn't read the OP.

Well, You should play completely un-anchored. And you CAN mute without anchoring. Just rest your palm on the bridge, and whenever you want to palm mute just bring up the hand.
Not anchoring doesn't mean your hand should be floating.


Hope This Answered Your Question,
#9
Quote by TechIndustrial
Isn't resting your hand on the bridge anchoring? o_o

Technically I guess you can say it is.
But my understanding of what people say when they talk about anchoring, is that it's when you are in contact with the guitar in a way that creates some sort of tension.
You'll still need to be touching a lot of your guitar in order to keep strings muted etc... don't get stuck on technicalities like that.
Just keep your hand totally relaxed when you're playing and you'll be fine.

Other than that..everything that you need to start playing unanchored has pretty much been said above. Just curl in your fingers to a sort of loose fist and play. Good luck!
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#10
^ if your hand is pressed against the bridge and doesn't move, it's anchoring.

I've heard that to make the transition easier, just practice playing unanchored for only a portion of your practice time at first, is this okay, or should I just play completely unanchored?


It's up to you, why not try it both ways? Obviously you'll make faster progress if you only practice the "new" way, but you can still play and jam and gig with your current technique.

Also, for the sake of learning to play without your hand being anchored, would it make sense to not do any right hand muting whilst practicing this? Any other tips or advice from anyone else who unlearned this habit?


Not really, right hand muting is essential. What you need to do is train yourself to mute with the exact amount of pressure needed to mute the strings, and no more. Your hand should still be free to move.
#11
Quote by TechIndustrial
So, I'm convinced to stop anchoring after some reading and I'm wondering how to go about it. I've heard that to make the transition easier, just practice playing unanchored for only a portion of your practice time at first, is this okay, or should I just play completely unanchored?


+1 to Freepowers answer.

The more you practice the sooner you will unlearn, play completely unanchored unless in a setting where you have to play as best as you can.

Quote by TechIndustrial

Also, for the sake of learning to play without your hand being anchored, would it make sense to not do any right hand muting whilst practicing this? Any other tips or advice from anyone else who unlearned this habit?


My suggestion is that you take it one step at a time.

First learn to pick non anchored, when you are extremely comfortable and accustomed to it beginn to practice on your palm muting.

It can be pretty disorienting having to learn 2 new techniques while simultaneously unlearning other 2 bad habits

In the end is up to your preference, give it some time and dont let your old habits kick in.
Wish you success.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Oct 18, 2011,
#12
Cheers for the advice everyone, this clears a lot of stuff up. So far the transition actually hasn't been as bad as i expected either.