#1
This is actually referring to PA speakers but I guess it's just a general question about speakers. Is there any downside to 15" speakers as opposed to 12"? Obviously 15" speakers will give more bass response but will that compromise the higher frequencies? I'm looking at a system to buy and it comes in 15" or 12" and the 15" isn't that much more... Just need help deciding. Thanks
#3
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-audio/phonic-powerpod-740-plus--s712-pa-package/630488000000000 Here's the link. I'm buying as a complete package cause I need it kind of quick. This one looks perfect, unfortunately there's no 10" option and I don't think I can mix and match 12" and 15"

Edit: the link is to the 12" version obviously. The other version is the same but with bigger speakers for $20 more. I'll be using it for acoustic guitar and vocals for now but eventually I might want to add a sub and use it for my band
Last edited by Metro Gnome at Oct 18, 2011,
#5
15" speakers (in guitar cabs atleast) hold together better with low tunings and such because the speakers surface area is larger so it moves more air, meaning it can produce lower frequency notes better. but because of the larger surface are there is an upper threshold for the notes it an reproduce because higher notes need less air moved, but a 15" speaker will always moved more air than a 12" speaker so the 12" speaker doesnt hold the low notes (like drop A# guitars) as well. but it can reproduce higher frequency notes better (Ie high frets on a standard tuned guitar and vocals.)

If if just acoustic guitars and vocals youre after, and both systems provide the same power, go with the 12s, IMO.

also i think 12" speakers spread the sound in a wider angle than the 15s.

and yea, it might be worth it to get a subwoofer if you want to use it for your band.
Last edited by Seanthesheep at Oct 18, 2011,
#7
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Its got a horn, so itll handle highs fine.

Sweet. Cause I was looking at reviews and a bunch of people who got the 12" said they wished it handled lows better. And it's only a $20 difference in price. I think this package seems perfect for me. Thanks guys!
#9
Quote by Metro Gnome
Is there any downside to 15" speakers as opposed to 12"?


the smaller a speaker is, the lighter it tends to be (due to the use of less material in implementation).

the upside to smaller speakers is that they are lighter which can relate to more efficiency (sound louder) but that is not really the point. the idea is more that the speaker cone can be moved back and forth with more response and accuracy with less energy. smaller speaker have less cone surface area though and this takes away low end response.

larger speakers tend to be heavier (duh), this has the result of reisisting change in motion and making the speaker less responsive and more sluggish (which tends to make notes of particular frequency stand out more). bigger speakers move more are (and have more inherent baffling) and allow for greater low end response.

how a speaker really works is complicated and large speakers can be 'tuned' with a cone of varying thickness along the 'dust cap-to-basket' to make a larger speaker vibrate in ways that doesnt sacrifice high end as much.

in 'pro-audio' and 'hi-fi' worlds 2-way and 3-way cabinets help minimize the limitations of 'single speaker-size cabs'. so a PA wedge may use a 10" driver and a 1.5" tweeter; or something even more complex with bass flex designs, horns, etc. these setups are more complex than guitar cabs, but the idea is to seperate the audio frequency spectrum and have appropriate transducers handling the range of the spectrum they handle best (and conversely they keep ranges of the audio spectrum away from the transducer if it doesn't handle them well, like keeping low end away from a tweeter). this allows

Quote by Metro Gnome
I'm looking at a system to buy and it comes in 15" or 12" and the 15" isn't that much more... Just need help deciding. Thanks


a bigger speaker will make your low end cleaner. knowing how your ear hears sound and what frequencies are produced on what type of driver will help you make a more informed decision. if you are using this for the audience i'd get bigger speakers (for various reasons), if this PA is more for practice and monitoring during gigs then i'd go with a 12" or 10" (also for various reasons).
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#10
Quote by Seanthesheep
15" speakers (in guitar cabs atleast) hold together better with low tunings and such because the speakers surface area is larger so it moves more air, meaning it can produce lower frequency notes better. but because of the larger surface are there is an upper threshold for the notes it an reproduce because higher notes need less air moved, but a 15" speaker will always moved more air than a 12" speaker so the 12" speaker doesnt hold the low notes (like drop A# guitars) as well. but it can reproduce higher frequency notes better (Ie high frets on a standard tuned guitar and vocals.)

If if just acoustic guitars and vocals youre after, and both systems provide the same power, go with the 12s, IMO.

also i think 12" speakers spread the sound in a wider angle than the 15s.

and yea, it might be worth it to get a subwoofer if you want to use it for your band.


this really isn't too bad, sounds like you are getting a handle on things but this info is more 'quasi-correct' than fully correct. i got most of my info from this dude, he used to design PA setups for a living and has some real solid info we could all benefit from.

http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/Phil+Starr/contributions/columns/

his speaker and cabinet content is some of the best on UG.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae