#2
Think of the theme, the tempo. It takes a lot of imagination, you have to imagine the composition in your mind. Also, listening to such music from composers for inspiration is a great way to start writing something.

Also, you don't really have to think over all of the composition, you can just start composing, and you should come up with the ideas along the way.

Consider getting a midi keyboard and a lot of good VSTi(virtual instruments)
#3
Quote by Zeletros
Think of the theme, the tempo. It takes a lot of imagination, you have to imagine the composition in your mind. Also, listening to such music from composers for inspiration is a great way to start writing something.

Also, you don't really have to think over all of the composition, you can just start composing, and you should come up with the ideas along the way.

Consider getting a midi keyboard and a lot of good VSTi(virtual instruments)

well that's the basic concept I use when composing but... I'm really interested in making the percussion beats and all that and also in some names for VSTi
#4
Logic is a great program to use. All I can say is that it takes patience and training. A lot of it.
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#5
Quote by Vendetta V
well that's the basic concept I use when composing but... I'm really interested in making the percussion beats and all that and also in some names for VSTi



yea, ive been wanting to find some percussive VSTI's for some halo-esque type rhythms and stuff
#6
Look around and buy some VSTs.
I'm sure there are loads of great percussion VST software out there. Obviously not free ones.
Though you could probably find some alright free samples if you have a sampler or something.

Though as to getting into the business of making stuff for films/games, you have to start at the low of the low, super low budget indie stuff that you probably won't even get paid for and stuff.

In terms of the composition of music for films/video games, listen to people who compose great/popular soundtracks for stuff and analyse the hell out of it, see how each track suits each scene/part, etc.
#7
What type of percussions?

You mean those huge bass drum ensembles and such? Like in LOTR?
#8
Xioaxi just had to get banned didn't he.
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#10
Some guys on an internet forum aren't going to help you write good film music. Enrol on a film music course/get online lessons from one of the respected users on vi-control.net.
#11
Quote by griffRG7321
Some guys on an internet forum aren't going to help you write good film music. Enrol on a film music course/get online lessons from one of the respected users on vi-control.net.

This
#12
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I'm just waiting on him to speak through StewieSwan

Is it an indefinite ban, do we know?



He's banned forever and ever.


Nah, he's got about 20 days left.
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#13
aww Xiaxi is banned

as for the whole composition learning and getting into the industry, this is yet the very beginning process of it, I'm not even thinking of composing for movies atm, jsut planning to do some projects for me to see if I really can come up with good ideas, basically composing horror music (in a psycho metal kind of way) is already fine by me but adding that extra touch with all kinds of weird effects is what I'm after, so far I know evolve mutatis only which is good but quite expensive for learning and also a bit heavy for my computer

you guys can offer any other VSTi? not too big (cause 10000000000 effects don't really help you to learn, I'd rather try with very few possibilities to see what each can do than spend hours just trying out each sound for one second) and also may be available for trial period
#14
This is really very pretty site to get the information about music and learn music and getting the knowledge of the guitar. I am happy to seeing this site and will learn so many thing from this site.
#15
Quote by cristinajohn
This is really very pretty site to get the information about music and learn music and getting the knowledge of the guitar. I am happy to seeing this site and will learn so many thing from this site.



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#16
I'm also trying to get into scoring, I think something important is figuring out where music belongs. Listen to a bunch of movies and listen to where it starts, what kind of music it is, how it builds/drops, and where it ends. It also gives you an excuse to watch a bunch of movies, as "research". Try just jamming over movies/TV, if you have like a silent film or a movie with very little music that'd help, No Country For Old Men has little music, 12 Angry Men, just search around. If you want to do horror films, I'd suggest seeing what the current horror scores do, and try to incorporate that into your psycho-metal or whatever you got going :p Tension is a VERY important thing, especially in thrillers and horror. So you can't really just write a song and play it over a the movie, you have to take a note of everything.

If anyone disagrees, I'm sorry, I'm teaching myself on my own :p
#18
Well in this day and age, scoring has changed and only a few select composers do the big orchestrated stuff like Hans Zimmer and John Williams.

Mind you I speak only from my observations of the media (in it's broadest sense), as I myself have only small work experience in this area

These days most stuff is a combination of formally/regular written stuff with ambient sounds or synthethic sound design elements.

You can go for the Orchestra thing, but John Williams already does this so good, that unless he dies before you hit the market with you're skills, he most likely is gonna be called for the big productions.

Yet independent productions can be nice to do as a friend of mine does this for a small gaming company in the Netherlands.

The ambient thing

This shares some quality's with what a studio producer does, and a book/guide/course in studio engineering or mixing/mastering should be able to help you big on this.

True ambient elements imo come from recording real (acoustic) sounds, and alter them with eq-uing, filtering, and reverbation.

A course on this as I said can help, but if you can't do this for personal reasons, then I suggest first to learn the basic-intermediate in's and out's of a DAW, and find a book somewhere on studio engineering, as this is about mic placement how different mic's work etc.

Offcourse you can experiment with yourself in this, but you will need a good mic to really pick up all the nuisances of you're sound experiment, cause eq-ing things away is easy, but artifically adding frequency messes up the quality of ur sample.

Then you have the Synthetic way.

Is using VST's and do basic changes to them. Advanced would be sound design where you actually shape ur own sound with different types of synthesis and messing around with the ADSR (abbreviation for Attack, Decay, Sustain, Release) <--- something which is quite important in synthesis and production.

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#19
Quote by rockingamer2
I remembered something:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLdg5MU7sgk

Enjoy.


Hmmm that was really helpful, but that's more of a further down the road advice. Most of it is about terminology and communicating with the director, which I found informative. I think here we need something about how to open yourself up to the idea