#1
I've recently read a few things among the forums and threads about power conditioners. Are they something along the lines of allowing you to keep power without 9v adapters and all the wires and cables and plugs?

Also why is it that when it comes to music equipment, old is always considered better. I know the reason for tube amps. But like guitars and pedals mostly, it comes out, people like it, they reissue it and they hate it swear up and down it's junk and only originals sound good be cause of one chip or another or even direct remakes see Mu-Tron - Q-tron, the older one goes for hundreds, when it was remade and just put in a new box it's lesser.

How is it that old is always better? Can a new version of a pedal ever be good or better? If it was really such a tone killer, why would a company deliberately always take a dump on gold, or are tone snobs just eager to complain and justify? I'm a cheap gear guy, and it annoys me when you find a deal, and someones always like well, it's boss so you know... but if you find the 1983 japanese version with purple screws (about $300) you'd be in tone heaven. end rant... discuss
#2
Um... a power conditioner cleans and regulates the power. I think you described... batteries?

And older isn't ALWAYS better. Sometimes it actually is, companies get worse and try to widen their profit margin by selling on name alone and using cheap parts.

But a LOT of times, newer is better! Technology and techniques improve, and mistakes are fixed and quality control is better.
Some people just play along in their head though, like some kind of gear hipster. They might prefer the old inferior components, or tell themselves they do because that's what their favorite artist used back in the day.

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#3
Power conditioners remove noise from AC power and prevent electrical surges and spikes that can seriously damage your equipment. They don't cost too much and are well worth the investment if you gig.

As for the "old is always better," I'm afraid this one has been done to death. It is a subjective thing; even to the point of what instrument one is talking about. Guitarists tend to be more enthralled by old instruments from the 1950s and early 1960s than bassists. It is difficult to explain this phenomenon today. Back in the 1970s when there were not nearly as many good instruments to choose from, this line of thought had considerable merit. Gibson was sold repeatedly throughout the 1970s and their quality suffered greatly. Fender was sold to CBS in 1965 and their quality took a major nose dive. The older instruments were genuinely better than their contemporary counterparts.

Some people insist that there was so much more hand-fitting of guitars and basses back in the 1950s and early 1960s, and this makes those instruments better. It probably helped the attention to detail, but it also led to noticeable differences in the specs of the instruments. Thus, some were better than average and others were worse than average.

Guitarists got over their vintage fetish in the 1980s, when everyone wanted a Partscaster SuperStrat like Eddie Van Halen. Vintage guitar prices dropped into the basement. The Dot-Com boom of the 1990s made multi-millionaires out of young people who had lusted after sunburst Les Pauls from the 1950s and now they could afford them. This drove the prices through the roof, and the vintage Fender market followed suit. Time will tell if it holds, but the artificially inflated prices of those old guitars probably means that the bottom will fall out again.

Are they better? Some of them are, but not as a whole. In 1979 Les Paul said that the Les Pauls Gibson was making were as good as the ones he played in the 1950s. Few would agree, but the quality was improving steadily and Les Paul was a pretty good authority on whether a guitar was any good. As for Fender, they are parts-built guitars designed to be mass produced. Modern CNC machinery makes this process better. Some people say the quality of the woods was better back in the 1950s, but again, this is highly debatable. So a lot of it boils down to "Mojo." Some musicians insist that old instruments have an ineffable "Mojo" that the newer ones don't have. Since this can't be measured, how can anyone be sure?

Older does not automatically mean better. Bassists embraced modern technologies and exotic materials while guitarists didn't. And when was the last time you saw a drummer searching for a drumkit from the 1950s? It comes down to personal preference. Play what you want. It's your money, so what you think is best is the benchmark for you.
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#4
I can tell you exactly why the "old is better" myth hangs around.

Back when all the guitars were built by hand, there was a lot of variation between the good ones, and the bad ones. For the most part, the good ones have a higher rate of survival than the bad ones (although there are less of them).

The whole power conditioner "removing noise from your AC" is utter nonsense, and serves no practical benefit. Your amps run off DC, and so any artifact or noise is lost in the conversion - it's just crap(just like the ESP power cable, that has a built in power conditioner, that makes your amp sound better. Guess what, it doesn't; it's all in your head). Sure, they can help with power surges, but isn't that what the fuses are for?
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#5
Quote by FatalGear41
And when was the last time you saw a drummer searching for a drumkit from the 1950s?


You'd be suprised... Austin craigslist is full of people selling and asking for vintage drums and gear. I don't see why, usually parts have been replaced, I mean more than anything save a piano they are very much like a machine and machines wear down.

your guitar info was helpful, I was more curious on pedals, but I guess the hipster/mojo, and cheaper components bigger profits make sense. I just think it's weird, like if the fabled green big muff came out after the newer model, do you think people would be as strongly outspoken that it lost the real big muff tone? I think it's a matter of what you've grown used to, and following the bandwagon, especially on forums, multiple searches even by none users will find huge swathes of people asking and always getting referred to the vintage or pricy boutique model, then they pass that on. Then time goes by and it becomes "common knowledge" then of course there's the all of a sudden some cheap semi obscure pedal is discovered to be the next new thing.
#6
Let's get to something not touched upon yet- askrere, the thing you describe as a power conditioner is a pedalboard power supply. They are erroneously called power conditioners, but some do have inbuilt conditioners (btw, I do feel power conditioners have their place, but not with bass amps. Hifi yes, instruments no). Look up the Voodoo Labs Pedal Power- you plug it into the mains, and then you have a number of 9v nd 12v outputs for your pedals. So you still have cabling, but only one mains point for several pedals.
#7
Oh, in that case, I have a GFS daisy chain 9v adaptor with 5 plugs on it, I think thats the same thing. I was thinking there was something I could use to power both amps, my pedals and preamp without multiple extension cords, power strips and the like, but I guess not.
#10
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smells expensive


The 'bay has Furmans from $65 to over $300 - just depends how far you want to dive.
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#11
I think Fatalgear gets the win on this.
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#12
I have the Furman m-8x power conditioner in my rack and it does the job. Got it for $50 on ebay. Saves me from having to plug a bunch of crap into the wall and protects me from power surges.
pinga
#13
so is this fermented thing just a power string that screws into a rack?

Edit: so rabid didn't you play a mark IV and a 2x15? do you have new gear says a Mark VIII and you say rack stuff
Last edited by askrere at Oct 20, 2011,
#14
Quote by askrere
so is this fermented thing just a power string that screws into a rack?

Edit: so rabid didn't you play a mark IV and a 2x15? do you have new gear says a Mark VIII and you say rack stuff

Basically, but it's extremely useful and convenient. I only have to plug one thing into a wall, and I don't get that crappy dirty noise.

I never played a mark IV, i've had the Mark VIII and 215 and the rack stuff is relatively new, but it's a few months old as well. (basic rack since I'm not into effects, it's just the Furman and the Korg racktuner).
pinga
#15
Ah, Well I was thinking of making a rack out of scrap wood and truck bed liner and velcroing a surge protected power strip into the back. Hopefully that will work for me in the short run
#16
That's probably one of the most janky rack set-ups i've ever heard of but yeah, it could work. That's practically what it is, I just rather have something I could mount in a rack and have at eye level rather than carry around a strip and stuff.
pinga
#17
Quote by FatalGear41
Power conditioners remove noise from AC power and prevent electrical surges and spikes that can seriously damage your equipment. They don't cost too much and are well worth the investment if you gig.

As for the "old is always better," I'm afraid this one has been done to death. It is a subjective thing; even to the point of what instrument one is talking about. Guitarists tend to be more enthralled by old instruments from the 1950s and early 1960s than bassists. It is difficult to explain this phenomenon today. Back in the 1970s when there were not nearly as many good instruments to choose from, this line of thought had considerable merit. Gibson was sold repeatedly throughout the 1970s and their quality suffered greatly. Fender was sold to CBS in 1965 and their quality took a major nose dive. The older instruments were genuinely better than their contemporary counterparts.

Some people insist that there was so much more hand-fitting of guitars and basses back in the 1950s and early 1960s, and this makes those instruments better. It probably helped the attention to detail, but it also led to noticeable differences in the specs of the instruments. Thus, some were better than average and others were worse than average.

Guitarists got over their vintage fetish in the 1980s, when everyone wanted a Partscaster SuperStrat like Eddie Van Halen. Vintage guitar prices dropped into the basement. The Dot-Com boom of the 1990s made multi-millionaires out of young people who had lusted after sunburst Les Pauls from the 1950s and now they could afford them. This drove the prices through the roof, and the vintage Fender market followed suit. Time will tell if it holds, but the artificially inflated prices of those old guitars probably means that the bottom will fall out again.

Are they better? Some of them are, but not as a whole. In 1979 Les Paul said that the Les Pauls Gibson was making were as good as the ones he played in the 1950s. Few would agree, but the quality was improving steadily and Les Paul was a pretty good authority on whether a guitar was any good. As for Fender, they are parts-built guitars designed to be mass produced. Modern CNC machinery makes this process better. Some people say the quality of the woods was better back in the 1950s, but again, this is highly debatable. So a lot of it boils down to "Mojo." Some musicians insist that old instruments have an ineffable "Mojo" that the newer ones don't have. Since this can't be measured, how can anyone be sure?

Older does not automatically mean better. Bassists embraced modern technologies and exotic materials while guitarists didn't. And when was the last time you saw a drummer searching for a drumkit from the 1950s? It comes down to personal preference. Play what you want. It's your money, so what you think is best is the benchmark for you.

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#18
Quote by askrere
How is it that old is always better?


I would cautiously venture to say that there is some older music equipment and technology that can be argued as better than some modern implements, even if modern furnishings have made the older stuff better. I'll try to advocate logically.

My first example is tube amps. A lot of players (guitarists mostly, but quite a few bassists as well) hold tube amps in higher esteem than their solid-state counterparts. Tube amp wattage is generally perceived as 'more powerful' (louder) than solid state amp wattage due to the fact that tube amps are generally slower to clip than solid state amps when each are pushed to their respective maximums.

A second example is flatwound strings. A holdover from the upright bass still remains a popular (though definitely not necessarily better) choice for the modern bassist.

Some players and studio techs also prefer older spring reverbs (with actual springs) rather than the modern offerings. Vinyl has stuck around as a viable musical medium partly because of how music sounds when played through a record player (the other part could very well be called nostalgia or hipster culture, but that's an argument for another day).

In short, a lot of the argument has to do with the preference of the individual player. I'll agree that a lot of the hype for older instruments can be annoying, especially since bassists as a whole have embraced newer technologies much faster than our guitar-playing brethren.

If not for our general love of new technology, there would be no neodymium magnet speakers, no all-graphite basses, no smaller, lighter bass heads and cabs, no compact ukulele-basses with polyurethane strings. I think the world of the bassist is pretty exciting with all the new technology and equipment we get to try out and experience.
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#19
Quote by Cb4rabid
That's probably one of the most janky rack set-ups i've ever heard of but yeah, it could work. That's practically what it is, I just rather have something I could mount in a rack and have at eye level rather than carry around a strip and stuff.


My entire rig is janky lol, nothing costs over $70 but one of my amps

Edit: So after I made this post I made a 2 spot rack

Janky maybe, free of course
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Last edited by askrere at Oct 22, 2011,