#1
Hi there.

I have a new Washburn Dime333.

ANd I still have a unused Seymour Duncan SH-4 pickuo, meant for the bridge

thinking now to use it as neck pickup
next to a Billo Lawrence XL500 in the bridge

Could that work?
#3
I doubt that very much.

if it;s too hot for the neck position, I'll screw it lower.
from what I understand (but I could be wronge, hence the post), there is no real difference in bridge or neck pickups, other than that neck ones are less sensitive.

the position gives the pickup its core-sound, so I figured:
if I place a great and clear pickup (sh-4) in that position and ill screw it down so that its not too hot, I must have a great sound
#4
I have one of those pickups... trust me on this... mount it in the bridge.
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#5
ok, but why.
can anyone give me a technical explaination?

for example:
its very common to use a emg81 as a neck pickup

so what this special thing with SH-4's that makes 'em unsuitable for the neck?
#6
EMG 81s are pretty much terrible as neck pickups (imo anyway).

Anyway, I don't know about technical explanations but I would agree with the others and say don't put an SH4 in the neck. It won't sound good.
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#7
Quote by jgd666
so what this special thing with SH-4's that makes 'em unsuitable for the neck?


JBs are trebly to the point of being shrill. If that’s what you really want your neck pickup to sound like, then go for it. But don’t come back here complaining that your cleans sound cold and dull and don’t have any warm overtones.
#9
Not really sure but isnt that Billo Lawrence XL500 more suitable in the neck? JB can be placed in the bridge then. Otherwise I would not recommend putting JB on the neck, it will be too harsh sounding and treby.
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#10
Quote by jgd666
the position gives the pickup its core-sound, so I figured:
if I place a great and clear pickup (sh-4) in that position and ill screw it down so that its not too hot, I must have a great sound

You'd have to mount a JB behind the guitar to get it to a good neck pickup level. You can only screw a pickup down so much before it starts sounding weird.

The "technical" explanation is that it sounds like crap. You're right in that there's no real difference except voicing and power between neck/bridge pickups, but that right there is your answer - the JB is absolutely designed to be a bridge pickup (it's not just the power, it's the EQ/tone/voicing/whatever you want to call it). You can try it in the neck, but like everybody else here, I think it's a bad idea. You can put really skinny tires on your car and really fat ones on your bike, but there's a reason that the opposite convention exists.
#11
I've never tried it myself, but it has been done. For example, the Jackson USA KV2 King V is loaded with two JB's. That leads me to believe that it probably won't be the complete disaster that everybody here is predicting. Still, I can't imagine it being great either.
#12
^ My point was based on trying the KV2. Granted, it's not my type of guitar, but still...ew.
#13
Quote by Roc8995
^ My point was based on trying the KV2. Granted, it's not my type of guitar, but still...ew.


Fair enough, I haven't played one! But I assume that it must 'work' for some people, or they'd put a '59 or a Jazz in there like they do with most of the other models.
#14
Give it a try. People have successfully switched positions of pickups before.

Michael Romeo of Symphony X plays with a Dimarzio Tone Zone in the neck (X2N in the bridge) and he has some killer tones.

The Tone Zone and the JB have similar output, although the JB has some pretty sharp highs.
#15
My problem with the EMG 81/81 set, as well as the JB/JB, is that with such high output and the amount of gain typically used with these guitars, it seems like the neck pickup is just there because it's easier to use the selector switch than the tone knob, or because the guitar looks cheaper without one. There isn't enough variation in tone under those circumstances to warrant the cost if it's the same pickup. Everyone I know with the 81/81 just parks the switch on the bridge anyway.

The other problem in this situation is that the JB has more output than the XL500, and by a fair amount if I recall.
#16
It will work, however you will over power just about any bridge pickup out there, especially your XL 500. You will never get a balanced sound between 2 pickups with that configuration. Maybe sell it/trade for a neck pickup.
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#17
well, we'll see.
tomorrow it is done and hey, if it turns out to be a disaster, well, then its changed again!

I have a ' 59 Duncan as well in another guitar.
but it really ia a bit to low-output for me.

I want this big fat howling Dimebag-ish neck tone
Last edited by jgd666 at Oct 19, 2011,
#18
Quote by jgd666

I want this big fat howling Dimebag-ish neck tone

Why? His tone is arguably very bad for being such a "ripper". and his tone is far from fat, I'd give it more of a Shrill, muddy cluster-fu*k.

And if you want his tone get the Duncan Screamin Demon pick up, It will turn almost any guitar into a mud slingin' monster.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
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Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#19
The guitars mentioned above that have JBs in the neck use the neck model of the JB, which uses a different coil winding to get the same sort of tone but with proper response from the neck position. What OP has is the bridge model JB.

Simply lowering the pickup will not fix its problems in the neck. The coil winding is too thick. Lowering the pickup will lower output and it'll weaken general response. That pickup is wound to respond properly to the tight vibrations at the bridge, not the wide and loose vibrations at the neck position. Your wound strings are going to be nothing but a mass of inaudible bass and the plain strings will sound muffled, like they're already old and worn out.

EMG pickups can work in both the neck and bridge because they don't have to be wound differently. They use such a low, weak wind with such a weak magnet that they can be put anywhere. They're jazz pickups at their hearts o they can respond well to damn near anything. It's only the preamp that gives them the huge output they're famous for but that comes in after the pickup gets the initial signal.

The JB won't work like that. It's not a jazz pickup, it's not designed for wide response to accept anything. What you have is a pickup designed and built specifically for one kind of tone in one position. If you use it for something else it's going to sound crap.

You wouldn't use a low output country or jazz neck pickup in the bridge, right? And you'd know exactly why, the reaosning is obvious. Well it's the exact ame thing here, just in reverse.


Quote by jgd666


I want this big fat howling Dimebag-ish neck tone

Well the JB doesn't 'howl' in any position. It more grumbles. It certainly won't howl in the neck. What you want is a much more open wind. A SD Jazz or DM PAF Pro will serve you much better. You could even try a SD Pearly Gates, maybe swap the A2 magnet for a A4 or A5.
Last edited by grohl1987 at Oct 19, 2011,
#20
Quote by grohl1987
The guitars mentioned above that have JBs in the neck use the neck model of the JB, which uses a different coil winding to get the same sort of tone but with proper response from the neck position. What OP has is the bridge model JB.


As far as I know there is no such thing as a neck model of the JB, and there never has been. It's meant to be paired with a Jazz or a '59.

The Jackson KV2, for example, as the TB-4 Trembucker version in the bridge and neck.
#21
Didn't know there was a neck version of the JB. Can't find any information on it - is it lower output, or just the JB with the slugs and logo reversed? I know the single coil sized JB junior has a neck version, haven't played it though.

The KV2 sure sounded like it was the same pickup in both positions. If it really was a neck pickup version (and specs seem to indicate it's not), it wasn't changed much.
#22
Huh, I felt sure they still made a neck JB made around the 10k DC mark, but looking it up now the most recent mention of it on a site was 2002, guess it's long out of production then. My bad, I assumed it was still around.
Last edited by grohl1987 at Oct 19, 2011,
#23
Quote by grohl1987
The guitars mentioned above that have JBs in the neck use the neck model of the JB, which uses a different coil winding to get the same sort of tone but with proper response from the neck position. What OP has is the bridge model JB.

Simply lowering the pickup will not fix its problems in the neck. The coil winding is too thick. Lowering the pickup will lower output and it'll weaken general response. That pickup is wound to respond properly to the tight vibrations at the bridge, not the wide and loose vibrations at the neck position. Your wound strings are going to be nothing but a mass of inaudible bass and the plain strings will sound muffled, like they're already old and worn out.

EMG pickups can work in both the neck and bridge because they don't have to be wound differently. They use such a low, weak wind with such a weak magnet that they can be put anywhere. They're jazz pickups at their hearts o they can respond well to damn near anything. It's only the preamp that gives them the huge output they're famous for but that comes in after the pickup gets the initial signal.

The JB won't work like that. It's not a jazz pickup, it's not designed for wide response to accept anything. What you have is a pickup designed and built specifically for one kind of tone in one position. If you use it for something else it's going to sound crap.

You wouldn't use a low output country or jazz neck pickup in the bridge, right? And you'd know exactly why, the reaosning is obvious. Well it's the exact ame thing here, just in reverse.



Well the JB doesn't 'howl' in any position. It more grumbles. It certainly won't howl in the neck. What you want is a much more open wind. A SD Jazz or DM PAF Pro will serve you much better. You could even try a SD Pearly Gates, maybe swap the A2 magnet for a A4 or A5.


thanx man, best answer so far.

I read stuff about the Dean Dimetime.
Its sort of a Seymour Duncan ' 59 but with a higher output.
Cause again, I have a ' 59 and its just a bit to weak for me.

The Dimetime is yet another vulture-ish dimebag ripoff ofcourse, but if it does the trick...
and it sure is a lot cheaper than a seymour duncan!
#24
I used to have a Les Paul that I put JB's in both the neck and bridge. I got the idea from Phil Keaggy, who did that to one of his guitars. It didn't sound bad, but not as smooth as a Jazz or a 59.
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