#1
I have been looking at some of the more mainstream heavier drop d kind of stuff to play on acoustic. I seem to noticed that most acoustic versions of songs from bands like senses fail, taking back Sunday, hawthorne heights, brand new, the used, ect. Seem to be power chords, and i see a few of the same power chords in almost every song. i guess my question is why don't they use regular open chords.
And when playing power chords that are tabbed like this
e|----------------------------------------|
B|------------------------0-00000---------|
G|-4--4x7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7x0-00000---------|
D|-4--4x7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7x2-22222---------|
A|-2--2x5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5x2-22222---------|
D|----------------5-5-5-5x----------------|
Do you only play the strings with the notes on or do you strum the whole thing. I am confused since this tab has parts like the last one with 0's which would indicate open strings.
thanks.
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#2
Quote by Cloudkicker
I have been looking at some of the more mainstream heavier drop d kind of stuff to play on acoustic. I seem to noticed that most acoustic versions of songs from bands like senses fail, taking back Sunday, hawthorne heights, brand new, the used, ect. Seem to be power chords, and i see a few of the same power chords in almost every song. i guess my question is why don't they use regular open chords.
And when playing power chords that are tabbed like this
e|----------------------------------------|
B|------------------------0-00000---------|
G|-4--4x7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7x0-00000---------|
D|-4--4x7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7-7x2-22222---------|
A|-2--2x5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5-5x2-22222---------|
D|----------------5-5-5-5x----------------|
Do you only play the strings with the notes on or do you strum the whole thing. I am confused since this tab has parts like the last one with 0's which would indicate open strings.
thanks.


You seem to be confused about what a power chord is for a start, it's got nothing to do with how you play it; a power chord is just a chord that only contains a root and a fifth. While ridiculous this is a power chord:

E|0
B|12
G|X
D|9
A|14
E|0

It's also technically an open chord since it contains open strings, it's just not an open position chord.

They don't use open chords because that's not the sound they're going for and given the bands you've named it's also likely they play that way because that's the way the original versions of the song are played.

Open strings have a different tone to fretted notes on most instruments, open chords have a pretty specific sound because of this, even more so on an acoustic; obviously they don't want that tone.

Also, generally you play something exactly as tabbed but if you add the open strings in and it sounds good to you then why not do it?
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#3
power chords where first crated because when playing a song with high distortion, a normal chord like A minor wouldnt sound clean, so to fix this power chords where created
#4
Why don't you just play the powerchord's like they were in the original song?
Add an octave or two (Periphery style )
Oh btw NewYngwie I play heaps of minor chords when playing Metal, problem? You mad?
But I agree some chords sound muddy.
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#5
no i didnt mean minor chords i ment like, a normal A minor, D major... bassicly any "normal" chord played with distortion is gonna sound muddy, some more depending on the amount used
#6
Quote by NewYngwie
no i didnt mean minor chords i ment like, a normal A minor, D major... bassicly any "normal" chord played with distortion is gonna sound muddy, some more depending on the amount used


Opeth, Cynic, Dream Theater, Ulcerate and any number of Djent bands all disagree with your opinions on more complex chords and gain.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#7
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Opeth, Cynic, Dream Theater, Ulcerate and any number of Djent bands all disagree with your opinions on more complex chords and gain.


When I play full chords with regular distortion it always sounds muddy. How does Dream Theater (John) make it sound.. unmuddy?
#9
Quote by Whackaweed
When I play full chords with regular distortion it always sounds muddy. How does Dream Theater (John) make it sound.. unmuddy?

I just want to add that what you may think is "regular distortion" is probably way too much gain if you're having problems with muddy sound.
Most of the bands above don't use heaps and heaps of distortion really.
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#10
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Opeth, Cynic, Dream Theater, Ulcerate and any number of Djent bands all disagree with your opinions on more complex chords and gain.

They can disagree as much as they want but when using higher than average distortion settings it does get muddy, why dont you see bands like jfac, chelsea grin, lamb of god and such using any chords except power chords? Because it is too much gain, but you can disagree
#11
Quote by Shor
I just want to add that what you may think is "regular distortion" is probably way too much gain if you're having problems with muddy sound.
Most of the bands above don't use heaps and heaps of distortion really.


With my equipment, my "AC/DC tone" is just as harsh and dissonant as my metal tone when playing regular chords.
#12
What is the difference between using regular chords and power chords?
Well, a chord with no 3rd isn't a chord. So, a "power chord" isn't a chord, it's a harmonic interval. And yes, it is very potent sounding. It only becomes a chord when another instrument supplies a 3rd. The only note you can get away with not playing and still have a chord, is the root....(go figure).

Actually, the distortion issue is easily explainable. I fairly certain that the root and the 5th played together creates mostly even harmonics. Hence, the inter modulation distortion is low. Most people can't hear low levels of harmonic distortion, and in large quantities, in certain circumstances, it's quite pleasant. So basically, harmonic distortion enhances the "chord", actually creating copies of itself.

However, when you add the 3rd, (major or minor, makes no difference), inter modulation distortion will create odd harmonics, which arenotes out of key by reacting with the root or the fifth.

An oversimplification would go something like this, 1st an 3rd together give you a basic interval of the 2nd and interaction between 3rd and 5th create a "4th" but since we're averaging it doesn't likely fall on a key note. That notwithstanding, the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th played together, is really annoying in it's own right.

Part of this is gain based, as an amplifier driven into "clipping", creates copius quantities of inter modulation distortion, along with the, (desired), harmonic distortion.

See, everybody's right in this thread, to one extent or another.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 21, 2011,
#14
Quote by Captaincranky
Well, a chord with no 3rd isn't a chord. So, a "power chord" isn't a chord, it's a harmonic interval. And yes, it is very potent sounding. It only becomes a chord when another instrument supplies a 3rd. The only note you can get away with not playing and still have a chord, is the root....(go figure).

Actually, the distortion issue is easily explainable. I fairly certain that the root and the 5th played together creates mostly even harmonics. Hence, the inter modulation distortion is low. Most people can't hear low levels of harmonic distortion, and in large quantities, in certain circumstances, it's quite pleasant. So basically, harmonic distortion enhances the "chord", actually creating copies of itself.

However, when you add the 3rd, (major or minor, makes no difference), inter modulation distortion will create odd harmonics, which arenotes out of key by reacting with the root or the fifth.

An oversimplification would go something like this, 1st an 3rd together give you a basic interval of the 2nd and interaction between 3rd and 5th create a "4th" but since we're averaging it doesn't likely fall on a key note. That notwithstanding, the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th played together, is really annoying in it's own right.

Part of this is gain based, as an amplifier driven into "clipping", creates copius quantities of inter modulation distortion, along with the, (desired), harmonic distortion.

See, everybody's right in this thread, to one extent or another.

wtf
they probably use power chords because it's the sound they're looking for, using full chords gives you another sound
Last edited by ArtemR at Oct 21, 2011,
#15
Power chords sound good with distortion.

Although they are many who make fun of guitar players using drop tunings, i think that in the end it is just a matter of personal taste.

You cam use more complex chords with distortion if you palm mute them adequately. You also have to keep in mind that you don't have to mute ALL the strings. You might also use accents and let ring some notes of the chords.

The best way is to choose a chord (even an open string chord) palm mute it and use different accents and different rhythms.

It is amazing how many things you can do with a chord, a metronome and LOTS of variations of note values.

Good luck
#17
On the topic of muddy-ness when playing "full" chords w/ distortion, I found that when I first got a distortion pedal and played giant chords I got that mud, and to solve it you simply turn down your distortion or guitar's volume, add some compression, and/or tweak your EQ to cut some of the highs.

Or you're just plain out of tune.