#2
If you want a free one, that's fairly simple to use, I'd recommend Sketchup.
I deeply regret the 6661 in my username. Siiiigh. Damn you, 14 year old me, you edgy little bastard.
#6
AutoCAD (at least as far as I'm aware) is a 2D drawing software. I think it may be able to do 3D wireframe, but not the typical solid models you normally associate with 3D modelling. It's also ridiculously expensive - worth it for industry, but I would say not for personal use.
#7
Quote by Boysie8
AutoCAD (at least as far as I'm aware) is a 2D drawing software. I think it may be able to do 3D wireframe, but not the typical solid models you normally associate with 3D modelling. It's also ridiculously expensive - worth it for industry, but I would say not for personal use.


ha! i got it 4 free. if ur a student you get it free. you can do 3D but its really hard. i might try something different.
#9
Not a fan of sketchup, as when I design stuff I like to be able to change pretty much everything as I go along, I don't find doing so intuative enougn with Sketchup sadly

+lots for Solidworks, it's amazing. Try to get your school to get a licence deal or something with them? Otherwise it's gonna cost you. But either way, it'll be worth it. Takes a while to get used to, then it 'clicks' with your head and you're finding it the easiest thing in the world. Also some great rendering software in it too, plus mechanical fixings etc.

Also I've used AutoCAD, though that was for civil engineering 2D drawings. Didn't know it could do 3D?
#10
I use CATIA by Dassault Systems. It's thousands and thousands of dollars, but I got it from my school since I was an aerospace major. Probably one of the nicest CAD softwares around, maybe see if your school has a license for it, or can get one. I guess there are other ways to get it as well, but I'll let you figure that out.
#11
Solidworks is by far the most user friendly 3D modeling software. There is better software out there that will be able to do almost anything you want, Solidworks does lack a few specialty things that some production companies would want, but as far as 3D modeling goes, it is simple to use and is pretty limitless.

Aside from just doing a 3D mockup of something, you can make all of your parts to say a guitar in seperate files, and then bring them all into one file and put them together, so then you would see what your whole guitar looked like once put together. You can also add simple animation to SW drawings, like a screw going into the guitar body, or a "movie" of the guitar assembling itself.

I know you asked for freeware, but there is no freeware that would compare. It is pretty expensive, but you should be able to get a "student" version of the program that would come with a workbook to walk you through the program and would come with a limited version of the program. I had one when I went to school, and the limits it had, were things you would never need to use anyways.
#12
That's a good point Wylde, I bought a tutorial book a few years ago which came with a 1-year student license. Almost no difference between that and the full version, except it says 'educational license' at the bottom of any drawings you make. I seem to remember it was only around 100USD as well - great value for what you get out of it.
I've also heard that Catia is really good. It's owned by Dassault, and runs on the same kernel as SolidWorks, but I think it's a lot more powerful.

We've been really lucky here (at least in terms of software) - a massive earthquake closed our campus for pretty much the whole of the first term, and SolidWorks gave us all one-year, full-spec licenses to use at home.
#13
Quote by Wylde_Life
Aside from just doing a 3D mockup of something, you can make all of your parts to say a guitar in seperate files, and then bring them all into one file and put them together, so then you would see what your whole guitar looked like once put together. You can also add simple animation to SW drawings, like a screw going into the guitar body, or a "movie" of the guitar assembling itself.


This just reminded me, I actually did this a year or two ago - here's what I ended up with.

Pics one and two are rendered, three and four are the sort of view you get normally. Bear in mind that that Ibanez ZPS is fully functional, as in I can move the parts around just like I would be able to in real life - so for instance I've made it so it can only tilt so far forward etc.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/9327118/1.png
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/9327118/2.png
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/9327118/3.png
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/9327118/4.png