#1
Ok so I'm trying to build the strength of my ring finger on my right hand by using it more. Instead of using just the index and middle, I'm really trying incorporate the ring finger into more of what I'm fingerpicking now.

Alex Webster gives a good example of how to use all 3 fingers here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3tTp7tgAbI&list=PL7C811B6A4C2CDB63&index=9

So ideally, we should be playing ring-middle-index-ring in that same sequence no matter what the beat is emphasizing, right?

However, I'm kinda stuck as to whether or not I should follow that same strict pattern for all licks/riffs. For example, to play this:

5--6--5--3--5

should we play it like: ring-middle-index-ring-middle

or would it be ok to play it like: index--mid-index-mid-ring

cuz for some reason, this latter way is coming to me way more naturally and it's confusing for me to play it the first way. the first way just takes more coordination between the 2 hands which I'm guessing the brain is not used to.

I know how analytic this sounds, and most of you will say "just play it the most natural way" BUT I'm making an effort to not get into bad habits and develop bad technique. So really, in terms of good technique, what's the rule here? Should we always be sticking to r-m-i-r-m-i-r, etc. no matter what the riff/lick is? Or are there exceptions as to which order we can use our fingers in?
#2
When it comes to which fingers to use, it's really preference. There's no 'right way'. Optimally, you'll want to be able to do it in any way you want - and you should be able to if you like - but if it feels good, do it. You need to be able to be flexible - that's the only rule.

Personally, I'd approach it m-i-r-m-i, but I prefer to lead with the middle finger.
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#3
I almost always use R-M-I, the only exceptions being when I include the pinky (some rhythms just feel better with the pinky), so I can definitely say it works. I think when it comes to plucking technique, it really is preference. Do whatever seems to allow the fastest potential speed (I assume if you're referencing Alex Webster you're going to want to maximise your speed), and stick with it.

Remember, playing instruments is (physically speaking) a very unnatural task. Just because it doesn't come naturally doesn't mean it won't feel natural once you put in the work.

I know this answer is kind of vague, but hopefully it'll help you think about it and maybe decide for yourself.
#4
Oh yes, I'm definitely aware that if we put in the work, it will become like 2nd nature to us.

I'm just conflicted as to which is the best way to go about this. And I want to be sure about it before I start putting in the discipline and work.

So Cool Z, does that 5--6--5--3--5 come natural to you in the r-m-i-r-m way (I'm assuming you've trained your fingers in that style)?
#5
Yes, that's second-nature to me now - no thinking involved. Is the problem you're having that the phrase is in groups of 4 (I'm assuming the last 5 is the beginning of a repetition?), and that with this plucking style being a group of 3, it's confusing you? I had this EXACT hurdle when I first started 3-finger style. It does take a fair bit of effort and a lot of playing slowly and deliberately, but it goes away.

If I'm misunderstanding, then feel free to explain again and I'll see if I can be of some use
#6
Quote by Cool Z
Yes, that's second-nature to me now - no thinking involved. Is the problem you're having that the phrase is in groups of 4 (I'm assuming the last 5 is the beginning of a repetition?), and that with this plucking style being a group of 3, it's confusing you? I had this EXACT hurdle when I first started 3-finger style. It does take a fair bit of effort and a lot of playing slowly and deliberately, but it goes away.

If I'm misunderstanding, then feel free to explain again and I'll see if I can be of some use


Hmm no, the last 5 is not the beginning of a next group of 4 or anything. that whole thing is more like a little fill in between gallops. Here, you can see it at the end of the first bar.


For me, I think the problem is more between the coordination between the left and right hands. Like my fretting hand is moving up, from 5 to 6 while my right hand is moving the opposite way, using the ring and then the middle finger (while fretting hand is using ring and then pinky)..don't know if that makes sense. I'm sure some slow repetitive practice will fix it. But in your opinion and experience, have you found that using the r-m-i pattern is the most efficient for fast-type of playing? Cuz yeah, I am looking to build good technique for metal music, eventually will get into sweeping also.
#7
Quote by Astralcat19
I find myself doing R-I-M mostly and sometimes I-R-M and occasionally just I-M. Its all preference really.


That's kind of where I'm at also. But I want to start practicing to build a solid technique so I want to do what is most efficient.
#8
ever since i learned how to use 3 fingers, i've been a lot better at playing bass than i was before. my wrist used to cramp up a lot before but now i barely ever have this problem, and i find playing with 3 fingers a lot more fun. i learned it just recently and it didn't take me long to get used to it. this video really helped me out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPXZAycPXvM

G|----------12-16-12---------------------------------------------|
D|-------14----------14------------------------------------------|
A|-12-15----------------15---------------------------------------|
E|---------------------------------------------------------------|

these are the tabs i wrote out from what he says to play in the video , if u play this with 3 fingers it is a really good exercise to help you get used to it

oh and i almost always play R-M-I


She's so pretty in her casts
The prettiest thing I've ever seen
I only get to hold her when she's injured
I only get to kiss her where she's sore
#9
If this confuses you then I'm really gonna throw you for a loop.
I typically follow three different patterns depending on what I'm playing.

1) Whatever finger I use on my fretting hand I will typically use the corresponding finger on my picking hand.

2) I will often use my pinkie (P-R-M-I) when I gallop. However I use it quite often.

3) In some cases I'll use a Flamenco style. When I wanna play something a bit more "involved"
Quote by FatalGear41
In the end, the only question is: what bass would Jesus play?

I think he's a Fender Jazz guy.
#10
Im more of a T-I-M and now and again R but generally never use my pinky on my right hand.
Yamaha TRB1006
Fender MIA jazz bass
Hora Hybrid double bass
Hartke lh 500
Ev 606L
Epiphone les paul
#11
I used to play 3 adjacent notes with the 3 first fingers, but now I usually replace the ring finger with the pinkie, don't know why. I guess it's energetically more efficient to do so but I'm feeling weak on my ring finger now maybe because of that :/ so I'll train it out again.
#12
i think that playing R-M-I-M and then again R-M-I-M would be the better way, but it is even more complicated at first... i think's that's sheehan's technique though i might be wrong... and i'm also interested in this, since i am a beginner and i want to develop a good techinique from the very start. anyway, i'll tel you what info i got, when i start my clases on friday
Quote by FatalGear41
When you break a bass string, that snapping sound is the sound of six dollars going down the crapper.



Sterling Ray 35
Hartke Ha3500 head - Gallien Krueger 212MBE cab
Tech 21 VT Bass
Zoom b2