#1
Hey guys, I just wanted to ask if I get the basics of a passing chord. The basic idea of it is it's what you call a chord that isn't in the key of what ever you're playing that sits between to chords in a key? Is that it or am I completely wrong or missing part of what it does.

I'm kinda of confused by it. Also, is a passing tone the same thing only a single note?
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#2
Yup. Although it can be in the key too.
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#3
Ah, alright. Is there anything else I should know? I stated all I know and I'm not sure if I should move on with the info I got or search for more.

EDIT: actually, I do have a question. Since a passing chord can be in the key or outside of it what makes it a passing chord?
Current Gear:
Mexican Fender Telecaster
Robert Smith custom Jazzmaster
Stratocaster
Vox AC4TV
Last edited by unicornfist at Oct 20, 2011,
#4
Quote by unicornfist
Ah, alright. Is there anything else I should know? I stated all I know and I'm not sure if I should move on with the info I got or search for more.

EDIT: actually, I do have a question. Since a passing chord can be in the key or outside of it what makes it a passing chord?



If there is a chord in a progression that has no other harmonic value other than to create tension and doesn't resolve to the next chord then you can call it a passing chord.

Generally when chords that appear which aren't key come up they are 'borrowed' from a parallel key (Of course this is situational to the progression but usually the 'odd' chord can be located back to a familiar parent key). For example in C maj:

Cmaj - Fmin ('borrowed' from the key of Cminor) - Dbmaj ('Passing chord' as it fits in neither keys) - Gmaj.

I hope that helped and gave you some food for thought and hasn't confused you.
#5
If there is a chord in a progression that has no other harmonic value other than to create tension and doesn't resolve to the next chord then you can call it a passing chord.


Not to nitpick, but:

Actually I would think that the nature of it being "in passing" would tend to give it a tension/resolution function, sandwiched in between something more diatonic - much like how, on a more simple level, a chromatic passing tone "resolves" to a diatonic note.

A "passing chord" as brought up is a generality that can take multiple forms. Two common forms it can take would be the 2ndary dominant and the tritone sub, both of which normally resolve, indeed, the whole function of which is to resolve to a targeted place.

Edit Note: Just to be clear so noone nitpicks *me* in turn, 2ndary dominants and tritone subs are not *inherently* passing chords, but it is very common for them to function that way.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Oct 20, 2011,