#1
What are these like? Any good?
What are the differences to the standard model apart from the wood?

I'm considering getting rid of my strat and buying myself one of these, would like to try one out first though!
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#3
Also the one I've been looking at is the 60's tribute and all of the finishes say "worn." Now on the pictures I've seen of them they look immaculate instead of worn, which is what I want, but I have seen that a few people have recieved them worn down on the body, are they all like that or!?
Amp:
Blackstar HT-50 Head
Orange PPC212

Guitars:
Fender Telecaster '62 Re-issue ('84)
Takamine G-Series Acoustic

Pedals:
Ibanez Tube Screamer
Boss TU-3
Boss DD-3
Boss BF-3
ISP Decimator
Zvex Fuzz Factory
Jim Dunlop DC Brick
#4
The wear inflicted on them varies depending on the luthier who relic's them. The difference between the Studio and the Standard is as follows

-Some studios dont have a maple cap and some do, the ones that do have a non flamed or quilted top.

-Usually pretty simple finishes on them, the finishes on the newer studios are getting out of this world though.

Other then that its the same guitar just not as fancy looking and most do not come with a hardshell case, though this is changing as well too.

That 60s one you have seen is no longer available from Gibson either, they only produced a certain amount so you gotta find one in a store somewhere if you want one, been on the hunt for one for 4 months now, missed my chance to grab one last Thursday.
2011 Gibson Honeyburst LP Trad. w/ SD Whole Lotta Humbuckers
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#5
Quote by ne14t
The wear inflicted on them varies depending on the luthier who relic's them. The difference between the Studio and the Standard is as follows

-Some studios dont have a maple cap and some do, the ones that do have a non flamed or quilted top.

-Usually pretty simple finishes on them, the finishes on the newer studios are getting out of this world though.

Other then that its the same guitar just not as fancy looking and most do not come with a hardshell case, though this is changing as well too.

That 60s one you have seen is no longer available from Gibson either, they only produced a certain amount so you gotta find one in a store somewhere if you want one, been on the hunt for one for 4 months now, missed my chance to grab one last Thursday.

Really? All the shops online I've came accross seem to stock them still!
Amp:
Blackstar HT-50 Head
Orange PPC212

Guitars:
Fender Telecaster '62 Re-issue ('84)
Takamine G-Series Acoustic

Pedals:
Ibanez Tube Screamer
Boss TU-3
Boss DD-3
Boss BF-3
ISP Decimator
Zvex Fuzz Factory
Jim Dunlop DC Brick
#6
Quote by ne14t
The wear inflicted on them varies depending on the luthier who relic's them. The difference between the Studio and the Standard is as follows

-Some studios dont have a maple cap and some do, the ones that do have a non flamed or quilted top.

-Usually pretty simple finishes on them, the finishes on the newer studios are getting out of this world though.

Other then that its the same guitar just not as fancy looking and most do not come with a hardshell case, though this is changing as well too.

That 60s one you have seen is no longer available from Gibson either, they only produced a certain amount so you gotta find one in a store somewhere if you want one, been on the hunt for one for 4 months now, missed my chance to grab one last Thursday.

Are you in the US? My local guitar center has a new Gold Top hanging on the wall.
#7
Quote by W4RP1G
Are you in the US? My local guitar center has a new Gold Top hanging on the wall.


I <3 gold tops. I was going to buy a studio last year but it was too expensive for me.
#8
One distinct difference in the Studio is the neck.

If someone has been playing a Stratocaster, they will immediately notice the thickness of the Studio's neck when they pick it up. It's a lot thicker and depending on how you play it may not suit you. The LP Standard has a slimmer neck similar to a Stratocaster neck.
#9
Quote by andrewfx


I'm considering getting rid of my strat and buying myself one of these, would like to try one out first though!


i moved from a strat to a LP a few years back, but fortunately kept the strat as i eventually migrated back to it and got rid of the LP.

i find (compared to strats) LP's have a chunky neck and although they have a good rock tone they are not as versatile as strats especially for rhythm and clean tones.

definitely try before you buy.
I've been imitated so well I've heard people copy my mistakes.
- Jimi Hendrix
#10
I owned a 2000 Gibson Studio for several years, and it is a very nice guitar. They do have some variances from guitar to guitar, so be sure to try first.

The only reason I sold mine was financial hard times, and the fact that I had not played it in 2 yrs because I bought a PRS CE22 that was way lighter. But mine was pre-chambered days where you had a solid hunk of mahogany around your neck for hours.
2002 PRS CE22
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2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
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Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#11
Quote by GraceKim
One distinct difference in the Studio is the neck.

If someone has been playing a Stratocaster, they will immediately notice the thickness of the Studio's neck when they pick it up. It's a lot thicker and depending on how you play it may not suit you. The LP Standard has a slimmer neck similar to a Stratocaster neck.

with all due respect, the necks on all gibsons are distinctly different from one another, from one individual guitar to the next. and of course, not all strats have the same neck profile either - so it really depends what strat and what les paul you're talking about. my strat's neck and my les paul's neck are about the same thickness, my les paul just has a slightly more chunky feel due to the more rounded profile..

and that goes a long way towards my answer to the initial question: it depends on the individual guitar. some les paul studios are very good, some are a bit iffy - my advice to anyone buying a gibson would be, try a bunch of them and get the individual one that you like best, if you find one you like enough to buy, that is...
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#12
If you're going to buy a Studio, it really ought to be the Faded model. They're significantly cheaper and most (all?) of that price difference is in the finish, which I actually like better on the Faded.

With all the more affordable Gibson models out right now, I'm not sure a regular Studio should be on the table if you're buying new. For less than the studio, you could get a Faded, a 50s tribute, a 60s tribute, a BFG, or a Gothic Morte (good guitars if you can stand the name/look). The only thing the Studio offers over those is a wider variety of finishes.

Of all those models, I think only the 50s tribute and Gothic have a big neck profile. The standard 60s carve on most of the Studio-level Gibsons is barely larger than a Strat neck. Until you start getting into the 50s carve on those two, or on the 50s neck Standard, or the bigger Reissue necks, there's not really enough of a difference to slow you down. The bigger problem if you're used to a strat neck is probably going to be the painted neck, which is why I'd suggest a Faded. Their necks feel a lot closer to the raw feel of a good Fender neck.
#13
I played my friends gibson lp studio yesterday and i want one. Its had a fair share of mods done to it though

Beat up toured old studios are great.