#1
The possible benefits of playing slowly are undeniable, but how should one go about balancing slow practicing with faster practicing? Should you slow practice every day at least a little? really focus on slow practice 2-3 days/week. Theres a lot to learn and only so many hours a day to practice, and slow, focused practice takes a while to get through stuff.
I once hit a man in Dearborn. Michigan. A hit and run. I hit him and just kept on goin. I don't know if he's alive or dead. But I'm sorry. Not a day goes by i don't see his face.
#3
im asking in general, for anybody wishing to improve their abilities
I once hit a man in Dearborn. Michigan. A hit and run. I hit him and just kept on goin. I don't know if he's alive or dead. But I'm sorry. Not a day goes by i don't see his face.
#4
Quote by rabbittroopsux
The possible benefits of playing slowly are undeniable, but how should one go about balancing slow practicing with faster practicing? Should you slow practice every day at least a little? really focus on slow practice 2-3 days/week. Theres a lot to learn and only so many hours a day to practice, and slow, focused practice takes a while to get through stuff.


Take note to what I bolded. Rome wasn't built in a day, rockstars didn't become rockstars overnight.

It all takes times, you can practice fast if you want, expect to be sloppy. Like the other guy said, take it slow.

It may take sometime to get through things but doing so slowly ensures clean, smooth songs and clean chord changes, etc.

Going through it fast ensures mostly sloppy technique etc.
Last edited by Halt at Oct 20, 2011,
#5
why yall keep trying to read into my question, instead of just answering? i never said im in a rush or anything. im asking this question as a general question for anybody, at any level.
I once hit a man in Dearborn. Michigan. A hit and run. I hit him and just kept on goin. I don't know if he's alive or dead. But I'm sorry. Not a day goes by i don't see his face.
#6
Depends on what level you are, i guess.

Also, go with your gut feeling. It's usually always the way to go.

*completely did not answer the question*
G(g)od was like: "Make you an ark of gopher wood; rooms shall you make in the ark, and shall pitch it within and without with pitch."

And i was like: "What's gopher wood?"
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#7
why yall keep trying to read into my question, instead of just answering? i never said im in a rush or anything. im asking this question as a general question for anybody, at any level.


You can't answer it for anyone at any level.

Generally speaking, you need to use slow practice to change bad habits into good ones, or to ingrain new or complex co-ordinations.

You need to do playing at normal speeds in order to build strength and stamina.

So sometimes you might need to do all your practice slow (if you've just spotted a bad habit or if you want to learn something like sweep picking), and sometimes you might not do any slow practice at all (eg, if you had to practice your bands setlist).
#8
Quote by Freepower
You can't answer it for anyone at any level.

Generally speaking, you need to use slow practice to change bad habits into good ones, or to ingrain new or complex co-ordinations.

You need to do playing at normal speeds in order to build strength and stamina.

So sometimes you might need to do all your practice slow (if you've just spotted a bad habit or if you want to learn something like sweep picking), and sometimes you might not do any slow practice at all (eg, if you had to practice your bands setlist).


Good advice !

In a attempt to answer your question:

Start slow and build from there.

It depends on what you want to learn.

Is there something your can play but want to get faster ?

Is it something you want to play (a technique like sweep picking for example ? )

Either way you should take a look at the 4,3,2,1 X 4 method that i developed and that i wrote about in my FREE ebook.

It is in chapter 2. You should also read chapter 1 to know how to mentally prepare for the guitar learning aspect.

Here is the table of content of the book:

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/the-guitar-blueprint-to-success/

GOOD LUCK !

PS: The simple fact that you have these questions say many things about you : that you want to be a better guitar player and you are commited to learning more. Congratulations
#9
Personally I think it's somewhat wise to separate this kind of thing in to two areas:

Practice and learning.

Practice would be things you do specifically to improve your technique: slow, painstaking movements, probably without a metronome because it's just so slow, making sure you're doing everything right and your technique is good and so on.

Learning is the traditional "start slow, speed up with a metronome" thing that everyone's aware of for learning specific licks, a song from someone else, an idea you want to hammer out in to something useful. That kind of thing.

The balance between slow and fast therefore depends on where you are in your playing and what you want to achieve. That being said, if you really want to make strides with your technique then you do need to practice regularly; even 30 minutes a day is enough to make relatively large advances in your playing.
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#10
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Personally I think it's somewhat wise to separate this kind of thing in to two areas:

Practice and learning.

Practice would be things you do specifically to improve your technique: slow, painstaking movements, probably without a metronome because it's just so slow, making sure you're doing everything right and your technique is good and so on.

Learning is the traditional "start slow, speed up with a metronome" thing that everyone's aware of for learning specific licks, a song from someone else, an idea you want to hammer out in to something useful. That kind of thing.

The balance between slow and fast therefore depends on where you are in your playing and what you want to achieve. That being said, if you really want to make strides with your technique then you do need to practice regularly; even 30 minutes a day is enough to make relatively large advances in your playing.



thats how i was looking at it. wut u say is learning i said was "faster". I know i asked a simple question but i understand about proper learning mechanics. but at the same time it can be easy to go a while without really focusing at a slow speed and making the leaps you couldve made, or going over kill on slow speed and not staying nimble. am i wrong in assuimng that no matter how good you are youd still benefit from the same tyoe of focus? just cause the returns are diminishing they still arent free just cause youre already amazing?
I once hit a man in Dearborn. Michigan. A hit and run. I hit him and just kept on goin. I don't know if he's alive or dead. But I'm sorry. Not a day goes by i don't see his face.
#11
Quote by rabbittroopsux
thats how i was looking at it. wut u say is learning i said was "faster". I know i asked a simple question but i understand about proper learning mechanics. but at the same time it can be easy to go a while without really focusing at a slow speed and making the leaps you couldve made, or going over kill on slow speed and not staying nimble. am i wrong in assuimng that no matter how good you are youd still benefit from the same tyoe of focus? just cause the returns are diminishing they still arent free just cause youre already amazing?


Maybe it's just because I haven't been up for very long but none of this made any sense to me...

What I think you're getting at though is the idea of the balance between the two things when, really, there are three things to balance: practice, learning and playing. I don't know about you but I often just sit and play: cut loose with technique and do what I like which often involves playing very silly things a bit too fast. You do need to have a good balance between the three though or you're right, you'll probably develop a block on playing fast. To that end several people have introduced the idea of speed bursts in practicing: when you've been practicing a while you really ramp up the metronome and play as fast as you can. Personally I think as long as you're not being an idiot and only practicing it's not actually an issue but it's something else to think about.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.