#1
How/where do you guys get soloing ideas for soloing and improvising? What techniques do you use to develop melodic lines?
Thanks!
#2
Add bacon, more bacon and finally, more bacon.


jking about that part. As for soloing ideas i play a scale in a certain key, or just go chromatic with certain patterns in mind.

For techniques, i like to sweep, do some legato, tremolo picking, etc.
#4
close your eyes and think of a magical image... then transmorph that image into notes! But you may need to download the latest image transmorpher/conveter for your human operating system, some not compatable with early operating systems
#5
try and incorporate slides, bends, and vibrato into your solos, or a combination of the 3

scale runs are great, but only if they lead somewhere. messing around with scale runs and finishing with a tasty blues inspired lick sometimes works out well, or repeated/ascending chromatic patterns work well too

i would suggest listening to alex skolnick, rocky george, and marty friedman to get an idea about phrasing

thats what i would do anyway
#6
Well when i want to do melodic lead lines i often just try to come up with one in my head that would fit over the riff i've written. Then i spend some time finding that line in the right key on my guitar.

As for if im going for melodic "shredding" i often tend to use arpeggios. Much often Maj7 and minoradd 9 arpeggios. Although, i don't sweep them. ^^
#8
I follow chords in different ways, there's like a million of possibilities there. small chromatic ideas are really cool too, mixed with smooth bends and wide vibrato = yesss
#9
The best way to get ideas is:

1. Get a backing track (where they usually tell you the root note)

2. Start playing the 7 modes up and down the fretboard (just go from one mode to another until you reach the octave, then go back words)

3. Play then and you will automatically get across nice harmonies ( if you play in the key of the song, everything should sound good)

4. You can also mix Modes, Sweeps and Pentatonic.

5. You ascend in scales, descend in pentatonic and go up in sweeps and then repeat.

6. You can use any combination between those 3. That is probably the best advice my teacher gave me.

3.
#11
A simple way to write a good solo is to look at it as a collection of licks.
There is a sequence of expressions, just as making a short speech.

I also like using a flat-5 to bridge different phrases together sometimes.
Other times adding a note that doesnt belong in the scale/mode can work.

And other times...just stop thinking so much and just play. Recording can get
intense and the best of friends can get on eachothers nerves..lol. Anybody that
tells you different is a liar. You have to take it serious, but when it becomes a
chore and it's not fun anymore...your creativity suffers. That also goes for the
pressure you put on yourself.

Also remember that a great solo does not have to be complicated.
I bet Charlie Brown's teacher's name was Mrs.Hammett
Last edited by Washburnd Fretz at Oct 21, 2011,
#12
Use target notes from the chords you are solo over, this makes your improvisation sounding really connected to its backing. It also can add feeling. Like finishing a lick or run on the major third of a major chord your soloing over can emphasize a major sound. Tat also applies to miner thirds over minor chords.

Once you have that down you can also aim for some extended chord tones like 7th 9th and 13th to create some different sounds and tensions. But make sure its musical and tasteful.

Use some chromatic passing and approach notes here and there to add interest and tension. But dont dwell on them.

Using rests can be great. It gives the listener a chance to proccess what they are hearing and you a chance to think of what to do next. Rests can also be very powerful if used well. Dont be scared to stay silence for a moment or 3 in a solo.

Alternate rhythms. Dont just stick to 16th notes, 8th notes or any of the rest, switch between them. Include some long sustained notes and some short staccato notes.

Think about dynamics. Dont just play every note the same. Some can be quiet, some loud, some lightly brushed, some really dug into.

Finally, learn some solos by guitar players you really love to gain a great phrasing vocabulary.
#13
Quote by Freepower
I listen, use my imagination, and aim for chord tones.


^^ That + I steal some licks off other songs and tweak em' to make it my own. << Instant Profit $$$.
#14
Quote by Freepower
I listen, use my imagination, and aim for chord tones.

This. This is what's made me a somewhat respected player in my area.