#1
So, I'm running after barre chords again because i really really want to learn them.

My problem is, every time i try to make the shape, my middle finger falls over and leans on my barring index. I don't know why, and it feels bad, and i can press all the strings down with my index right now anyways.



Oh yeah, my room is messy.
#2
So you're middle finger is leaning against your index finger. Try holding your elbow out more (this may involve standing up or positioning the guitar differently). From your picture, your elbow looks too tucked in to your body. Hope this helps, and remember, practicing goes a long way.
#3
Quote by Skullivan
So you're middle finger is leaning against your index finger. Try holding your elbow out more (this may involve standing up or positioning the guitar differently). From your picture, your elbow looks too tucked in to your body. Hope this helps, and remember, practicing goes a long way.


Heh, i didn't realize that i had my elbow in. Standing up/Throwing the elbow out more Has no effect. Practicing does go along way when you know how to practice such a thing. I've encountered no one else with the same problem as me. Which is why I'm asking.

Must be some reason my finger does this, right?
#4
Thumb position perhaps? The most likely culprits of poor barre chords is poor technique (not trying to insult).
#6
Quote by sora0156
Is that a used jock strap on your floor? Clean your fn room.


Sorry that I have a job, go to college, then school work, workout. amongst other things I put my time into, at the end of the day I just want to relax, and play my guitar. It's a sock, a clean shirt, and a clean pair of boxers that fell from my dresser/shelf thing if you must know. a jockstrap? what are you 15?

Quote by Skullivan
Thumb position perhaps? The most likely culprits of poor barre chords is poor technique (not trying to insult).

right, I've messed with thumb positioning a lot with it too. Just can't seem to make it stand up.
Last edited by Halt at Oct 20, 2011,
#7
Quote by Halt
I've messed with thumb positioning a lot with it too. Just can't seem to make it stand up.


Thats what she said.

I think your best bet would be to show an experienced player in person. Id advise taking guitar lessons, but you have said that you are real busy - perhaps it would be worth finding out who the best teacher in your area is and organising a one off lesson, perhaps going back every couple of months so he can keep track of your progress and keep giving you advice on what to practice.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#8
Quote by Hydra150
Thats what she said.

I think your best bet would be to show an experienced player in person. Id advise taking guitar lessons, but you have said that you are real busy - perhaps it would be worth finding out who the best teacher in your area is and organising a one off lesson, perhaps going back every couple of months so he can keep track of your progress and keep giving you advice on what to practice.


I live in a small town, and there is but one teacher. Sad to say he is not very good.

However, I DO know a few good guitarists that came from his teachings but the way this old man works is he teaches you up to a certain level, and kinda drops you. You still go in for lessons but he doesn't continue to keep teaching you any new material. So those select few that are good used what he taught them to apply to new techniques that had to teach them selfs.

To get a good teacher is at least a 40 minute drive.

I have went to my brother about this, he's played for 7-8 years and he didn't know what to tell me really. He's very good as well.
#9
Yeah, I looked up your town in google maps and figured that you wouldnt have much choice in tutors. If you are thinking of making it an occasional thing like only once every couple months (only worthwhile with a really good teacher) then I geuss it could be woth that 40 minute drive. I know Rob Chapman has people traveling from all over the world for a long lesson with him. Try talking to the best guitarists in your area, regardless of weather they are teachers or not - if they are nice people they are likely to want to help you. Also, you could try Skype lessons, but thats not something I would go for personally.

I do think that talking to someone in person is the best way to help you figure out what your problem is, but if you persist in altering/experimenting with your technique and following advice from this forum (more pics/video might help) im sure you will eventually get past this hurdle.

Do you find barre chords any easier on an electric?
Also, perhaps you could try finger independence and stretching exercises focusing on your first and second fingers.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Oct 21, 2011,
#10
Mastering barre chords takes time, every guitar player can tell you that.

If i would tell you to practice more, it will probably sound to generic.

I will try to be more specific about this aspect:

1. Work on finger independence. Barre chord need your finger to be strong.

Try these exercises : http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/guitar-technique/guitar-finger-exercises/

Especially exercises 1 and 2, they seem to be the best for your problem.

2. To train you finger to sit in it's place you need to understand the muscle memory concept.

Hold your hand in the shape you want to play and just hold it there for 1 minute.

You can also make chord changes and don't press the frets, just hold your fingers in that position so that your hand gets use to the shape


For more information about muscle memory refer to my free ebook
#11
You may already be doing this, but a good trick for barre chords is to try placing your other fingers in position first and then using your first finger to barre.
#13
Quote by Halt
So, I'm running after barre chords again because i really really want to learn them.

My problem is, every time i try to make the shape, my middle finger falls over and leans on my barring index. I don't know why, and it feels bad, and i can press all the strings down with my index right now anyways.


I'm not really sure I'd classify this as a "problem". The "bent finger effect" really only happens on the "Em" voicing anyway. (Em open). It's sort of natural, and the pressure from your middle finger augments the force on the barre. Whether or not you can hold the barre with your index finger is largely irrelevant. With help from the other finger, it stands to reason you'd be able to hold it longer.

A similar thing happens when holding a barre in the A open voicing. When only the ring finger is used to hold the 3 strings of the chord, it's very natural to place the middle finger on the index to assist holding the barre. When using this shape, the middle tends to naturally remain straight however.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 21, 2011,
#14
Quote by Captaincranky
I'm not really sure I'd classify this as a "problem". The "bent finger effect" really only happens on the "Em" voicing anyway. (Em open). It's sort of natural, and the pressure from your middle finger augments the force on the barre. Whether or not you can hold the barre with your index finger is largely irrelevant. With help from the other finger, it stands to reason you'd be able to hold it longer.

A similar thing happens when holding a barre in the A open voicing. When only the ring finger is used to hold the 3 strings of the chord, it's very natural to place the middle finger on the index to assist holding the barre. When using this shape, the middle tends to naturally remain straight however.


Odd, I've talked to a couple local guitarists, including my brother, none of them have the "Bent finger effect". My brother can play barre chords without the problem I'm having.

So I would classify this as a problem, since well, it should be able to stand on its own.