#1
So, ive had this problem with my guitar for a while.. When i bend the higher notes (im talking frets 18-24) It goes silent. When I play the note without bending, it sounds fine. But as soon as I start bending, the note make a high screech for a split second and then goes silent.. So, what is the problem? Ive changed my EMG battery and strings..

EDIT: Its fine on E, A and D strings.. G string isnt bad, but there.. B, I can get a lucky sustain, and the high e doesnt sustain at all..
ESP LTD m400
Peavey Vypyr 30 w/ Sanpera I
Dunlop Crybaby Wah pedal
ISP Decimator

"Dream big, and dare to fail. I dare you to do that." - James Hetfield, HoF Speech, 09
Last edited by MidniteHaze at Oct 21, 2011,
#2
Your action is too low on the high strings. When you bend, the note frets out and chokes. Try raising it a little
#3
You may need new/better pickups (are they running on batteries?)

New strings usually solve that as well if the strings are old.
It's spelled wiener.
#4
It sounds like your notes are "fretting out." Something hits the string when you bend it and stops the vibration. This can be caused by a few things. The most common cause is a high fret or two. Have a good tech check your guitar with a fret level. If there are any offending high frets, that will find them. Then you just have the high fret evened out or get a complete fret dress (this can make a huge difference in overall playability).

The second major cause is a very round fretboard radius. My '52 Reissue Telecaster used to fret out like a son of a bitch. I finally got so sick of the vintage three-barrel bridge that I replaced it with a modern six-saddle Telecaster bridge. Boom! No more fretting out! And the thing plays better than ever. So depending on your guitar, it could be that you need a bridge setup.

The last thing that causes it is a twisted neck. A simple 1/8 to 1/4 turn of your truss rod will usually remedy this condition.

Now if you are saying that your pickups are actually cutting out on certain frequencies, then you need new pickups. I can't say that I've ever heard of that happening, though. Have the frets checked out and see if you've got a high fret or two.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#5
Quote by W4RP1G
Your action is too low on the high strings. When you bend, the note frets out and chokes. Try raising it a little

Now, this means raising the bridge on the high strings side correct? How do I know when its high enough?
ESP LTD m400
Peavey Vypyr 30 w/ Sanpera I
Dunlop Crybaby Wah pedal
ISP Decimator

"Dream big, and dare to fail. I dare you to do that." - James Hetfield, HoF Speech, 09
#6
Quote by MidniteHaze
Now, this means raising the bridge on the high strings side correct? How do I know when its high enough?


There are standard settings for string height from the 12th fret to the bottom of the string. These can be used as a baseline. What kind of guitar is it, by the way?
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#7
Quote by MidniteHaze
Now, this means raising the bridge on the high strings side correct? How do I know when its high enough?

I usually go about as low as I can before fretting out. It's kind of a trial and error thing. But if you have a Floyd, it's hard to do that. Although, a Floyd has a 12" radius(I think) and the common radius for many guitars with a floyd is 16", so you should be able to get fairly low, probably around 1mm, maybe lower, just depends on your fret work.
#8
Ok, so if it isnt sustaining when bending the 24th fret, can we rule out a fret being high?

Also, its an M series LTD, licensed FR..
ESP LTD m400
Peavey Vypyr 30 w/ Sanpera I
Dunlop Crybaby Wah pedal
ISP Decimator

"Dream big, and dare to fail. I dare you to do that." - James Hetfield, HoF Speech, 09
#9
Quote by W4RP1G
Your action is too low on the high strings. When you bend, the note frets out and chokes. Try raising it a little

this, sounds exactly like the same problem i had with my charvel. i couldn't bend fret 20 and up but i could with 19 and bend that even higher than i'd bend the 20th.

raise the bridge at high string side.
#10
The last thing that causes it is a twisted neck. A simple 1/8 to 1/4 turn of your truss rod will usually remedy this condition.


Don't start twistin away at that truss rod.. It doesn't adjust twist, it adjust bend.. (Isn't there a thread here on Truss Rod Adjustment?) If you don't know what your doing you could really damage your guitar...

Take it to a good, family owned music store and get it set up.. sounds like you got a high fret or two.. Have them crown and level the frets... I got a guy in Georgia that does this for $30.00 all day long and that includes a new set of strings..
Last edited by Papabear505 at Oct 21, 2011,
#11
Quote by Papabear505
Don't start twistin away at that truss rod.. It doesn't adjust twist, it adjust bend.. (Isn't there a thread here on Truss Rod Adjustment?) If you don't know what your doing you could really damage your guitar...

Take it to a good, family owned music store and get it set up.. sounds like you got a high fret or two.. Have them crown and level the frets... I got a guy in Georgia that does this for $30.00 all day long and that includes a new set of strings.


That's a helluva deal, assuming he knows what he's doing.

I don't know why it wouldn't sustain on the 24th fret. the saddles can affect sustain too, if the string doesn't sit right, but if it does it on a bend, then I don't know. I suggest taking Papabear505's advice and taking to a guitar tech(I recommend a smaller store with someone who's been doing it for many years). I don't know if you'll find a level/crowning for $30 though, they tend to be more around $100, but that can vary greatly.