#1
I have come to love Analog, organic tone, which is why I have fallen in love with Electro-harmonix and tube amps. I was wondering, what does everyone else love? Do you like SS and digital effects, or all tube and completely analog effects? Are you somewhere in between. Let me know!
#2
I really haven't tried any anolog pedals but I'm really liking the tones I'm getting from my digitech rp355.
Guitars: Fender FSR Standard Strat, Squire Affinity Strat, Epiphone Nighthawk
Amps: Vox AC15C1, Roland Cube 15x, Peavey KB-1
Pedals: Digitech RP355, HD500, Joyo AC-Tone, EHX Soul Food
#3
I think within the next 10 years analog will be pretty much useless (at the rate Peavey and Line6 are designing amps) But until then I think digital effects are fine, but I just cannot do Solid State Amps, after having a few tube amps, tubes just own!
#4
If you're getting an amp, obviously get tubes.

When it comes to effects, it depends on if it sounds good or not. There's plenty of effects that sound great digital. I use plugins for all my effects.

Analog Solid State uses electrical currents going through a solid state circuitry to modify your signal. Digital uses programming to modify a digitally encoded signal and spit it back out as analog.

It depends on how good it was designed.
Last edited by Clay-man at Oct 21, 2011,
#5
Quote by Pg.inc_music
I think within the next 10 years analog will be pretty much useless (at the rate Peavey and Line6 are designing amps) But until then I think digital effects are fine, but I just cannot do Solid State Amps, after having a few tube amps, tubes just own!


Hope not, but if SS starts to take over, my 74 twin will power my rig till I can't buy tubes for it... LOL

Analog With an admission that I'm not trying to be an analog snob... I listen to everythign and buy what I like...
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#6
Not all solid state is Digital. Solid State just means diodes instead of Vacuum Tubes.
Digital means that the signal is changed to a binary codec for the signal to be changed by a computer.
#7
Tube mapz fo life yo.

For effects, I've got analog and digital. Don't really care as long as the end result sounds nice. Nothing wrong with digital delays, reverbs, choruses, flangers, etc. Most digital drives sound pretty meh though.
E-peen:
Rhodes Gemini
Fryette Ultra Lead
Peavey 6505
THD Flexi 50

Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
Fender CS Mary Kaye

WTLT

(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
#8
Quote by Clay-man
Not all solid state is Digital. Solid State just means diodes instead of Vacuum Tubes.
Digital means that the signal is changed to a binary codec for the signal to be changed by a computer.


Thanks for the correction.. Are their Tube amps that are controlled digitally?
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#9
I like my tube amp and have my multifx hooked up to one. I have found that I can dial a digital amp sim on my multifx that is extremely close to my tube amp's preamp. I can also dial in tones on my multifx distortion stomps that are extremely close some of my analog pedals.

So for me the multifx offers other features I don't get in my separate pedals and that makes it very useful. My answer is they both have their place and the specific answer must come from evaluating the criteria that you personally have in mind.
Last edited by fly135 at Oct 21, 2011,
#10
Quote by Papabear505
Thanks for the correction.. Are their Tube amps that are controlled digitally?

Not that I know of. There might be some, but the circuit board for the digital side is most likely solid state.

For "digital amps", I use a lot of Amp Modelling software on the computer. There are some really good ones, but there are bad ones too. It just depends on the quality of the programming and how hard they tried to make it sound like a tube amp.

Tubes alter a lot of characteristics of the signal physically, and people who program need to recreate the alterations.
Guitars:
Davison SG
Line 6 Variax 600
Line 6 JTV 69s
Squier Classic Bibe Telecaster Thinline
#11
Quote by mmolteratx
Tube mapz fo life yo.

For effects, I've got analog and digital. Don't really care as long as the end result sounds nice. Nothing wrong with digital delays, reverbs, choruses, flangers, etc. Most digital drives sound pretty meh though.

Exactly this.

muledit:
Quote by Papabear505
Thanks for the correction.. Are their Tube amps that are controlled digitally?

Yes. Hybrids, such as the spider valve. But also amps with analog signal paths, but also amps that can be controlled via midi such as a fair few rack amps
RIP Gooze

cats
Last edited by mulefish at Oct 21, 2011,
#12
i use what works for me. analog, digital, whatever. everything has it's place.
#13
Quote by Clay-man
Not that I know of. There might be some, but the circuit board for the digital side is most likely solid state.

For "digital amps", I use a lot of Amp Modelling software on the computer. There are some really good ones, but there are bad ones too. It just depends on the quality of the programming and how hard they tried to make it sound like a tube amp.

Tubes alter a lot of characteristics of the signal physically, and people who program need to recreate the alterations.


Most multi-channel amps use digital micro controllers to do the switching. At least from the larger manufacturers.
E-peen:
Rhodes Gemini
Fryette Ultra Lead
Peavey 6505
THD Flexi 50

Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
Fender CS Mary Kaye

WTLT

(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
#14
And then there are things like the Mesa Triaxis that uses digital switching of tube circuits. Lots of digital but none of it in the signal path. The Marshall JVM does much the same thing - just not as well.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
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#16
One thing too, is you can always invent your own amp. Onhe with tiny tubes with 2 pins, instead of 8, And lots of them. Like 20 tiny preamp tubes, the size of a pencil eraser.

Make it. Now.
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#18
These are about the smallest tubes ever. The military had some smaller ones and there were those microscopic ones they made a few years ago but for practical purposes these are as small as it got. Of course, you need more than two pins. Not even a valve diode could work on two pins, you'd still need at least one more for the heater, even if it was directly heated.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#19
The microscopic ones, yeah. Those are what you need, TS. Also, hook the amp up to a compressor and bring it to absolute zero, for less resistance. It has an op amp inside it but its really just glued to the PCB to trick Cath into hating on budget-minded novices.
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."