#1
might be a stupid question but what does a compressor really do and should i consider investing in one? i'm mostly a metal head but i do love cleans (i'm very influenced by all that remains). i have active emg's and i find them to be fairly lacking on clean tones and they add a little bit of grit that i don't really want.

so is a compressor something that will help tighten up and even out my cleans and possibly help make them a bit nicer and clean up my pickups?
#2
I don't think a compressor will fix the lacking clean sounds from you emg's. A compressor evens out the level of the signal to a more even level. It could make the riffs sound a bit tighter though, especially distorted rythm riffing. But it won't fix any tones apart from a bit of added sustain.
#3
It mooshes the highs and lows into the mids, or something. I use a cs3 as a clean boost. You can do a lotta tone "tweaking" with it but its not gonna change your sound much. Just less dynamics and louder. They can get noisy sometimes so idealy its good to have a noisegate as well. Sorry, that probly isn't the answer your looking for.
#4
Quote by Radiomorph
I don't think a compressor will fix the lacking clean sounds from you emg's. A compressor evens out the level of the signal to a more even level. It could make the riffs sound a bit tighter though, especially distorted rythm riffing. But it won't fix any tones apart from a bit of added sustain.

It WILL make your pass-able clean louder. Oh wait, I'm lost with EMG's, pardon me
#5
A compressor reduces the dynamic level of an incoming signal past a certain level (the threshold). If you think of it graphically, the level of the signal increase normally (a diagonal line on a grid) until it hits the threshold, at which point the line bends to the right. This is called the knee. The amount of this bend is determined by the compressors ratio. e.g. 4:1 means that past the threshold level it takes 4dB of increase in input level to get 1dB of increase in output level. The result to a dynamically smoother signal.
Gear
  • 2004 Am. Strat
  • 2004 Mex. Tele
  • 2005 Esteve Classical

  • Vox Valvetronix AD15VT w/ foot switch

  • Vox 847
  • EH Stereo Polychorus
  • Ibanez TS-808
  • EH Big Muff Germanium 4
  • EH Small Clone
  • EH Small Stone (USA Ver 2)
  • EH LPB-1
  • PlusEBow
#6
so would a compressor be able to take my lead/ rhythm tone (i use an mxr full bore and love the tone but at times it feels almost too saturated) and help to tighten it up to sound closer to an amps on board distortion?

if a compressor will tighten my sound, will it be able to "remove" some of the saturation leaving me with a crisp, high gain tone?
#7
What it does is make the loud sounds quieter and the quiet sounds louder, evening out the overall volume levels. Is that what you want?
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#8
If you want better cleans, then try a chorus pedal.
Guitars: Fender FSR Standard Strat, Squire Affinity Strat, Epiphone Nighthawk
Amps: Vox AC15C1, Roland Cube 15x, Peavey KB-1
Pedals: Digitech RP355, HD500, Joyo AC-Tone, EHX Soul Food
#9
i use my carbon copy at the moment to add a little bit to my cleans but a chorus is very high on my list
#10
with a guitar loaded with EMG's, a compressor isnt really necessary. the emg's already even out the high's and lows across all the strings and do a great job at it.

but a compressor would be good for something like recording purposes to even out the levels say, between light and heavy pick attack, so u can get a less attack sound at the same volume of high attack
Quote by kangaxxter
The only real answer to the SG vs Les Paul debate is to get a Flying V and laugh at all the suckers who don't have one.


Quote by Blompcube

if you embrace inaccurate intonation it can be quite arousing.


I <3 TWEED
#11
Quote by Cathbard
What it does is make the loud sounds quieter and the quiet sounds louder, evening out the overall volume levels. Is that what you want?

And to add to this, distortion adds compression. Overcompression doesn't sound to great. Under high gain I don't think it's a good investment.
As for cleans: It's usually used for funk/country kind of music. Use youtube: proguitarshop have heaps of demos of various compressors. It will give you an idea of what they do.

Quote by EspTro
with a guitar loaded with EMG's, a compressor isnt really necessary. the emg's already even out the high's and lows across all the strings and do a great job at it.

but a compressor would be good for something like recording purposes to even out the levels say, between light and heavy pick attack, so u can get a less attack sound at the same volume of high attack

For recording's that kind of compression will usually be done in post processing.
RIP Gooze

cats
#12
You're not going to want to use it with high gain. Brilliant little pedal for cleans though. You're rolling back the volume knob right?