#1
I know my scales, but whenever i solo, it always seems to just play very scalular licks. I think that this has to do with both my ear, which isn't very good at reletive pitch, and the lack of licks that i know. So should i learn solos, or work on my ear, or both, but if you don't need one if you have the other, then which is better to work on?
#2
Do both. I think that you also simply need to improvise more.
Solos by famous artists are normally built by scales anyway, so you can look closely at how the notes used relate to the chords etc underneath, which may give you ideas for your improv. If anything, it'll improve your chops.
#4
Quote by guitarist@net
Do both. I think that you also simply need to improvise more.
Solos by famous artists are normally built by scales anyway, so you can look closely at how the notes used relate to the chords etc underneath, which may give you ideas for your improv. If anything, it'll improve your chops.

agreed. i practice that by learning a song (solo and all) then play it again but with my own version of the solo (most guitarists don't play the exact same version of a solo as the do in their studio versions). It allows me to experiment and be creative with the music.
#5
Learning solos definitely will improve your improvising.

It will help you get used to how a good solo is structure, helped expand your vocabulary and give you a feel for soloing.

But dont just learnt it from tab. See what scales/ arpeggios/ triads etc each lick or run is in. Learning the backing part to, and see the relationship between the solo and its backing. If there is a happy sound, see how they created it, and so on.
#6
Quote by jkielq91
Learning solos definitely will improve your improvising.


Agreed.
You will learn a shit load of licks (which you can use when improvising). You should train your ear as well, so that you would be able to play what you hear in your head on the guitar.


Hope This Helped,
#7
Quote by h2o_guitar
learn solos by ear.

This is truth. Learning by ear, rather than y tab or sheet music, connects what you hear to what you play. So, if you hear a lick in your head, you will be able to play it. That's what improvising is about.
The trick is to think "This lick would sound good," and then play it, rather than think "I'm in A minor, so I should play..." To be able to do this, you need to be able to hear something and know how to play it right away. And to develop that skill, you need to work out a lot of solos by ear.
This skill also allows you to quote licks that someone else has played. Useful when trading solos, or if you want to elaborate on a rhythm part.
#8
Quote by macashmack
I know my scales, but whenever i solo, it always seems to just play very scalular licks. I think that this has to do with both my ear, which isn't very good at reletive pitch, and the lack of licks that i know. So should i learn solos, or work on my ear, or both, but if you don't need one if you have the other, then which is better to work on?


If you want to become good at playing improvised solos and all your solos sound alike, it means you didn't master a wide specter of soloing styles. What you should do first is learn a bunch of good solos from different genres (even the genres you prefer less) and solos from as many different guitarists. This will give you a good stack of licks and tricks you can do while improvising. You will also get a feeling for different styles.
The second thing you should do is improvise as much as you can! Put together some chords or use already-made songs and try improvising over them. If you are looking toward perfection, you should also try soloing over patterns which require you to change key and in different rhythms (say 7/8 or 11/8). Even if you choose not to play over such thinks later even your solos over 4/4 will get better.
#9
My improvising isn't great really. I know a few licks I like that I use in every improvised solo I play, so they sorta sound the same. But, what has helped, is working out old blues songs by ear. BB King for example. His playing is very melodic and lyrical. And easy, for the most part. It's a good place to start.
#11
Besides the advice you already received, i would recommend that you devote 20 minutes a day to practice ear training alone.

Here is an article to get you started on this subject. http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/ear-training/ear-training-intervals/

Although it will seem repetitive and boring resist the temptation of thinking you already mastered it.

Do it until you can sing the scale effortlessly without your guitar in your hand.

Alternate between intervals and playing the scale up an down.

The final level of good guitarists is that they can reproduce with their voice what they intend to play with their guitar.

Music first happens in your head, then it is transposed to your instrument