#1
Hi,
I really don't know how to explain it but I have seen many guitarists playing a regular 3 string power chord but are striking all six strings and still are able to get just the power chord sound.
I really don't know how to do this I heard you need to mute the other strings with your thumb but I could do with a helping hand.

Thanks
#2
It maybe looks like they are striking more strings if they are strumming? Although if you play an E power chord at the 7th fret on the A string and play all three strings, you can then strike the others open for a full sound.
GENERATION 10: The first time you see this, copy it into your sig on any forum and add 1 to the generation. Social experiment.
#3
They're just muting the strings with their fretting hand, I do it all the time.
Originally Posted by Azbats63
I'm the only white guy in a band in El Paso. My bandmates call me El Diablo Blanco. They tell me it means "trusted friend."
#4
They could just be hitting the top 3 harder than the bottom 3.
Quote by JD Close
Piano dick had some good parts, but should have said "As the business man slowly gets boned", would have accented the whole dick feeling of the album
#5
If you mute the D string, you take out the third of the chord, and you're left with nothing but roots and 5ths even if you play the remaining 5 strings using an F shape. Just slightly fuller sounding power chords.
#6
OR they could just be playing the minor chord intentionally cause it was implied anyways. Eg: A5 C5 E5 A5 D5 G5 could be interpreted as Am, Cmaj, Em, Am, Dm, Gmaj where the guitar player is playing the whole minor chord but you (in particular) cant hear the difference...
Quote by jpnyc
You are what they call a “rhythm guitarist”. While it's not as glamorous as playing lead you can still get laid. Especially if you can sing and play.




Beer is the solutions to the world's problems.

#7
Quote by whyamihere
If you mute the D string, you take out the third of the chord, and you're left with nothing but roots and 5ths even if you play the remaining 5 strings using an F shape. Just slightly fuller sounding power chords.

But you aren't playing the third with the D-string, you're playing the octave.


OT:
It probably just looks like it. I do what looks like a full strum all the time, but I curve the strike so that it only hits the strings I want. It's not something I think about, just something I do.
Fender 72' Deluxe Tele
Schecter Damian Elite 7
Fender '62 Reissue Jazz Bass (MIJ)
Peavey XXX 212 (back on the East Coast)

Macbook Pro 15" Retina
Logic Pro X 10.0.7
Revalver 4
LePou Amp Sims
Ignite Amp Sims
LeCab2
RedWirez Impulses
#8
Quote by kumamilesbear
But you aren't playing the third with the D-string, you're playing the octave.

Brain-fail. G string.
#9
I use my pinky to mute all the other strings so I can strum like a monkey and not worry about it.
#10
Quote by whyamihere
Brain-fail. G string.

Ah.
Then yes.

Perhaps I shouldn't have jumped though. I sometimes play the 2 or the 3 on the D string when in a dropped tuning, and one of my favorite chords (only works on a 7-string) is an E shape major barre, but after the D string just play the open strings. It's this really pretty sounding C something.
Fender 72' Deluxe Tele
Schecter Damian Elite 7
Fender '62 Reissue Jazz Bass (MIJ)
Peavey XXX 212 (back on the East Coast)

Macbook Pro 15" Retina
Logic Pro X 10.0.7
Revalver 4
LePou Amp Sims
Ignite Amp Sims
LeCab2
RedWirez Impulses
#11
They probably mute the top 3 strings but the way they use their hand gives you the impression they hit all 6 strings.

Look Andreas Kisser's (from Sepultura) technique. He has such a technique but he rocks