#1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gOf89vWbBM

This is a song I wrote and have been recording/mixing for a few days. I used Cubase 5 for my DAW, Guitar Rig 5, Superior Drummer, and a lot of Waves Plugins.

I was wanting some opinions/critiques on the levels. Such as is the kick coming through, are the cymbals too loud, are the guitars balanced? Basically is everything balanced or is there something I might raise or lower?

I also have a sub bass hit I made in FL Studio at 2:22 and it sounds a little weak to me. Is there any specific way to make that stand out but not overbear the mix?
#2
The drums as a whole should be a touch louder perhaps, and I think that the lead (or non-chug) guitars should be more forward in the mix, but other than that it sounds pretty good.
#3
Guitars are a bit too heavily gained, in my opinion. I think more crunch than distortion would really shine on a track like this.

The drums don't sound bad, but lack any serious punch. I'd parallel compress the drum buss. The snare could use a bit more body and power, try a boost around 200hz. I'm partial to big/radio rock sounding drums on powerpop/poppunk mixes so this may not be your taste. Either way, they lack power.

Other than that, not a bad mix. Put some bass guitar in there and you're set!
#4
It sounds like a guitarist mixed it... Meaning all the focus is on the guitars while the drums and bass were more of an afterthought.

I'd agree that the lead needs to be brought out more. The drums are a bit quiet and that crash that's panned hard left is weirding me out. I'd bring the cymbals in a bit and make it all sound like one cohesive kit while still keeping a decent stereo spread.

That bass drop around 2:21 didn't fit at all.

Good effort though, keep up the good work man.
#5
Thanks. Yeah I'm a guitarist XD. I did a parallel compression but I could bring the volume up some more. My biggest flaw is bringing the kit together. I'll get good sounds on individual pieces but putting it all together (especially the cymbals) is rough for me for some reason.
#6
Quote by Odirunn
Guitars are a bit too heavily gained, in my opinion. I think more crunch than distortion would really shine on a track like this.

The drums don't sound bad, but lack any serious punch. I'd parallel compress the drum buss. The snare could use a bit more body and power, try a boost around 200hz. I'm partial to big/radio rock sounding drums on powerpop/poppunk mixes so this may not be your taste. Either way, they lack power.

Other than that, not a bad mix. Put some bass guitar in there and you're set!


I really like a snare with a thick top like "hitting butter" Idk if that makes sense. But when I had a eq like that it sounded dull in the mix so I used Chris lord alge drum presets and its brighter but not really the kind of snare I wanted.
#7
Quote by dinley
I used Chris lord alge drum presets


The irony here, of course, is that I'll bet that Chris Lord Alge (nor his brother Tom) does not use presets.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
The whole thing sounds a little distant and unfocused to me. A few thoughts:


- Way too much gain on the guitars!
- Excessive stereo spread, there's no meat in the middle. Rein in the drum kit to about 30L 30R and bring the bass volume up!
- For a quick fix, run the excellent freeware plugin Basslane on the master bus.

It sounds to me like you're doing what I did for a while - leaning too heavily on plugins! Work back and try and use the least amount of processing possible to get a good sound.
#9
Quote by kyle62

- Way too much gain on the guitars!
- Excessive stereo spread, there's no meat in the middle. Rein in the drum kit to about 30L 30R and bring the bass volume up!


So I should rein in the distortion on the guitars and.. should I pan them in more as well? I got them hard left and right. Should it be maybe L75 R75 or L50 R50 or closer?
#10
Something to think about when you're panning your drums... If you were to mic a kit, you'd use either a spaced pair, or my personal favorite, and xy over the drums. Either way, nothing on that kit is going to 100% L & R in those mics but you still get that full stereo image from the natural reverb that the overheads pick up. Some people like panning toms way out too. I personally disagree and try to line them up with where I hear them in the overheads. Now of course you don't have mics and can't do that, but keep that in mind while placing. Cymbals would be off to the side a bit, but not THAT far out. There would be a nice light reverb from the whole kit taking care of the space issue. I would also recommend going in and giving the snare its own reverb as that can make it stand out a bit and be more powerful while still keeping it tied in with the rest of the music.

And just for fun, if you want that awesome massive 80's sound, get a huge snare verb and throw a gate on it. Makes for an epic song every time
#11
*UPDATE*: http://www.mediafire.com/?n9my3qf5ld3hr5w

I brought all the cymbals, toms in around 33 on both sides, changed the compressor I was using to parallel compress, brought up the drum channel volume, and added some reverb to the snare and the rest of the kit. I added some to the kick too, just slightly cause it makes it sound more live. Let me know if you think it's too much though.