Can professional mixing/mastering really make a huge and massive difference?

#1
Hi guys, I just came up with this question, because now that Im experimenting and working on mixing and mastering my own project, I realised how hard it is, and I started to wonder what would happen if i gave my recording project to an expert for him to mix and master? Would that person be able to make a home recording project actually sound at least slightly professional? or there simply some projects experts engineers cant fix at all? I wanna know up to what extent a mixing/mastering engineer could perform a miracle!

I know it depends on loads of things, like the recording techniques you used for the recording itself, the instruments, the performances, etc, but would they be able to make a massive difference with a decent home recording project?

I'll leave you the song i've been working with, and the two versions I've managed to mix,so maybe you can tell me if the raw mix could actually have the potential of sounding massively better than that if it was a professional mixing and mastering the song

soundcloud.com/damienro0

Thanks people!
Last edited by damienro0 at Oct 24, 2011,
#2
At the time of me posting you haven't posted the song clip here, but yes experts are experts for a reason. They can take crappy sounding stuff and make it good.

With that said that can't make something that sounds absolutely horrible to a radio single. Mixing can be learnt and with proper gear and a good room can be done at home.

Mastering is something that should be left to professionals if you plan on releasing something commercially. Throwing Ozone (a VST) on a mix isn't going to get you the results as someone who is a professional.

To get good at either mixing or mastering it takes time and experience. Even more so for mastering than mixing.
#3
Quote by FireHawk
At the time of me posting you haven't posted the song clip here.


Ooops, mistake corrected!
#4
Mastering is usually just a bit of tweaking the volume across tracks to keep it even and automation within the tracks at loud or soft spots to try to keep it even

Mixing is the much more difficult part, imo. And yes, someone who really knows what they're doing will of course be more effective than someone who has just started.
#5
Quote by CrossBack7

Mixing is the much more difficult part, imo. And yes, someone who really knows what they're doing will of course be more effective than someone who has just started.


Yeah, but I am talking about dramatical changes here, of course i person who knows more will do better, but i am talkin about making something average, sound totally outstanding, and amazing!
#6
From giving a quick listen (I have a ton of homework to do for tomorrow and its midnight haha), so I won't get to in depth, those have a lot of potential. They just need mixed correctly and then mastered.
#7
A chef can make a great meal. Good chefs insist on quality ingredients, though, for a reason.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Quote by axemanchris
A chef can make a great meal. Good chefs insist on quality ingredients, though, for a reason.

CT

Exactly. A good chef can still do more with cheap ingredients than anyone else could, but they're not going to turn microwave meals into fine cuisine.
#9
To settle FireHawk and Crissback's mini-debate - mixing is the technical challenge; mastering is the artistic one, though they blur boundaries,and kriginally mastering was a purely technical thing (pressing vinyls from a master copy).

Mixing does a lot of the hardwork, but many mastering engineers started as great mix engineers and moved onto mastering after developing their ears sufficiently. Modern mixing is about crafting a clear, powerful mix - mastering is about making objective judgements and minor refinements to improve the mix, rather than being too technical a process (though it can be done in technical ways).
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