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#1
What exactly are the necessities for a good rack system? I know you can add a bunch of stuff you don't really need to one, but what exactly is necessary for a good rack system? I know you need a pre-amp and power amp, or you can just buy something like the axe-fx, but other than that is there anything that would be good to have?

Where can I learn more about the difference between pre-amp and power amp? I got the basic concept down but I dunno as much as I'd like about which one's strength is in this area (like ones better for gain or something like that)

Should I get wireless chords if I decided to ever play live so I don't run the risk of tripping over a chord and knocking the whole rack down, or is this never a issue really.

Is the tuner for tuning your guitar, or is it just some random effects thing that is called a tuner for whatever reason. (If it is I don't get why you can't just use a pocket sized one)
#2
There are a lot of different things you can get rack mounted: effects, harmonizers, compressors, modeling units, power units, etc... It depends on what your needs are, you can even have your amp(s) in the rack.

You don't need "wireless chords", if you run like a mad man through stage then maybe you could have just one wireless system from your guitar to your amp.

The tuner is for tuning your instrument quickly between songs when you are gigging.
How quick can you unplug your guitar, take out your pocket sized tuner, plug in the guitar, tune it, unplug your it from the tuner and plug your guitar back? (specially in the middle of a song/solo).

Edit: about the pre amp and power amp differences I just have a vague idea of how each work, can't help you really well on that subject, sorry .

By the way I run like a mad man through stage without wireless system and I'm just fine .

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Last edited by Perverockstar69 at Oct 25, 2011,
#4
I think you should wait another couple of years to educate yourself on rack systems before making a decision about purchasing one.

They're very expensive, complicated and aren't child friendly.

An Axe-FX will still need a power amp to be ran through a non-powered speaker cab (Think your regular Marshall, Mesa, Orange... ect regular cabs).

If you plan to use it without a power amp, the ways you can use it are;
-Through a powered monitor (Makie make a fair few great ones)
-Front of house/sound desk for live use
-Directly recorded through the XLR jack and plugging into your interface to record

"Wireless chords"? First off, cords, or more commonly called leads. Also, the "cords" aren't wireless, they plug into a receiver which is paired with the wireless unit. Most rack users go wireless to keep it all neat and to keep the complicated scheme of their rig going.

Rack tuners are a lot more accurate than any pocket sized no name tuner. It makes sense that if you're prepared to drop roughly $4000-5000 on a rack system, that you would like to atleast be in tune.

Pre Amp - Determines the amp's main guts for all the tone and shaping (EQ). It's where the gain (for metallers) prefer over power tube gain.

Power Amp - Powers the pre amp, and can be either solid state or tube. You can also get distortion from the power section, although it isn't as tight and defined or anywhere near as friendly to your ears decibels wise.
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#5
Quote by Perverockstar69
There are a lot of different things you can get rack mounted: effects, harmonizers, compressors, modeling units, power units, etc... It depends on what your needs are, you can even have your amp(s) in the rack.


I know, I just want to know what you basically 'need' for your rack. Like a pre-amp and power amp is something you need.


Quote by Perverockstar69
You don't need wireless chords, if you run like a mad man through stage then maybe you could have just one from your guitar to your amp.

Thats how all the cool kids do it!

Quote by Perverockstar69

The tuner is for tuning your instrument quickly between songs when you are gigging.
How quick can you unplug your guitar, take out your pocket sized tuner, plug in the guitar, tune it, unplug your it from the tuner and plug your guitar back?

So it's for speed?

Quote by Perverockstar69

Edit: about the pre amp and power amp differences I just have a vague idea of how each work, can't help you really well on that subject, sorry .

Thanks for the help anyways though.

Quote by Mopy
I think you should wait another couple of years to educate yourself on rack systems before making a decision about purchasing one.

They're very expensive, complicated and aren't child friendly.


Which is exactly what I'm doing. I'm trying to get a good starting point going for looking into these things better.

Quote by Mopy

An Axe-FX will still need a power amp to be ran through a non-powered speaker cab (Think your regular Marshall, Mesa, Orange... ect regular cabs).

If you plan to use it without a power amp, the ways you can use it are;
-Through a powered monitor (Makie make a fair few great ones)
-Front of house/sound desk for live use
-Directly recorded through the XLR jack and plugging into your interface to record


Alright, it threw me off because I saw people using it without any other equipment. Also I hear while they're similar, digital tones are still noticeably different than whatever other amp people use tone is, although I'm pretty sure these claims are just with bias so I'm going to try to research them better.


Quote by Mopy
"Wireless chords"? First off, cords, or more commonly called leads. Also, the "cords" aren't wireless, they plug into a receiver which is paired with the wireless unit. Most rack users go wireless to keep it all neat and to keep the complicated scheme of their rig going.


Just a typo...

Anyways, I just wanted to prevent something like some retard coming on stage (which I saw in a lot of major bands earlier videos when they where still underground, like megadeth) and possibly tripping over a cord and ruining the equipment. Now that I think about it, that's true for any gear, but it mostly concerns me if I'm dishing out like 5 grand for it.

Quote by Mopy
Rack tuners are a lot more accurate than any pocket sized no name tuner. It makes sense that if you're prepared to drop roughly $4000-5000 on a rack system, that you would like to atleast be in tune.


Just making sure there was a point, to me at first it sounded like some unnecessary thing you'd hear elitists brag about on their rig. Like a "You spend 500 on this much, when you could get the same thing thats less fancy for 5 bucks" type of deal.

Quote by Mopy
Pre Amp - Determines the amp's main guts for all the tone and shaping (EQ). It's where the gain (for metallers) prefer over power tube gain.

Power Amp - Powers the pre amp, and can be either solid state or tube. You can also get distortion from the power section, although it isn't as tight and defined or anywhere near as friendly to your ears decibels wise.


Thanks a lot for clarifying that.

Quote by muffinman123192


Danka, I saw this thread earlier but couldn't find it again.
Last edited by zomgguitarz1234 at Oct 25, 2011,
#6
Quote by zomgguitarz1234

Alright, it threw me off because I saw people using it without any other equipment. Also I hear while they're similar, digital tones are still noticeably different than whatever other amp people use tone is, although I'm pretty sure these claims are just with bias so I'm going to try to research them better.
.

The AxeFx and the Line6 Pod HD series are the best digital modelers that are out there and have proven to be quite successful at achieving tube tone.

Whenever you have seen someone using an AxeFx without a power amp or cabinet like on Youtube, you are more than likely seeing them use the computer recording capabilites where they are running a USB or other digital out into their computers. You can send pre amps through mixers/computers. You need a power amp in order to send that signal through speakers or cabinets.
#7
Quote by Sputnik1
The AxeFx and the Line6 Pod HD series are the best digital modelers that are out there and have proven to be quite successful at achieving tube tone.

Whenever you have seen someone using an AxeFx without a power amp or cabinet like on Youtube, you are more than likely seeing them use the computer recording capabilites where they are running a USB or other digital out into their computers. You can send pre amps through mixers/computers. You need a power amp in order to send that signal through speakers or cabinets.


Whats the alternative from digital pre-amps? From my understanding tubes are for power amps.
#8
Quote by zomgguitarz1234
Whats the alternative from digital pre-amps? From my understanding tubes are for power amps.

Pre amps can be tube as well. There are pre amp tubes and power amp tubes. They are not exclusive to only power amps.

When they say that an amp is a tube amp it means more than likely that it has a tube driven pre amp section and a tube driven power amp section.

It all comes down to how the amplifier was designed.

You can have a solid state (without tubes) pre amp run into a tube power amp and vice versa.
Last edited by Sputnik1 at Oct 25, 2011,
#9
Quote by zomgguitarz1234
Whats the alternative from digital pre-amps? From my understanding tubes are for power amps.


There can also be tubes in a pre amp section, depending on the amp/unit. Most tube amplifier heads have a power tube section AND a pre amp tube section.
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#10
FYI

Pre Amplifiers
Mesa Boogie Tri Axis
This is driven by 12AX7 pre amp tubes.

Something like an AxeFx or other modeler contain no tubes and are all solid state or digitally run.


Power Amps
Mesa Boogie Recto 2:100
This is driven by 6L6 power amp tubes.

Carvin Amplifier
This is run without the need of tubes.

I don't want to go into the science behind tube amplification. Others might be inclined to do so.
Last edited by Sputnik1 at Oct 25, 2011,
#11
Quote by Mopy
Pre Amp - Determines the amp's main guts for all the tone and shaping (EQ). It's where the gain (for metallers) prefer over power tube gain.

Power Amp - Powers the pre amp, and can be either solid state or tube. You can also get distortion from the power section, although it isn't as tight and defined or anywhere near as friendly to your ears decibels wise.
Your explanation of the preamp / power amp relationship is perhaps a bit ragged

The guitar supplies the input signal to the preamp. The preamp's output supplies the, (modified or not), input signal to the the power amp. The power amp powers the speakers, period.

These stages are in a combo amp, but they're integrated, so you can't mix and match a given preamp with any given power amp as you could in a rack system.

To obtain distortion from the power amp, it must be driven into what is called "clipping". That's a condition where the output expected from the power amp is more than the amplifier's ability to produce. (This is with respect to the amplifiers inability to produce the necessary voltage and current change, and dictated by the source.

IE: a 1 watt input might produce a 100 watt output, which we'll call the amp's maximum output. If you attempted to input a 2 watt signal into the same amp, you would expect 200 watts of output. This amp can't produce 200 watts, so it "clips", or actually flattens the tops of the input waveform, causing distortion.

Once upon a time people used "power soaks", to cause the amp to distort on purpose, yet maintain bearable volumes at the speakers. They're more effective with tube amps, since tube amps at clipping are richer harmonically than a clipped solid state amp. Solid state amp also have high damping factors which controls speaker movement after a signal has ceased. Tube amps have very little damping, because of the output transformer. In solid state amps, the output transistors are wired directly to the speakers. It's the reason the the impedance rating of the speaker system is so important.

Ironically, it's the faults of tube amplifiers that give them the sound that everybody likes. The second part of the irony is, transistor amps because of their lack of faults are better at reproducing the distortion that the tube amps create. Yep, it takes a clean amp to reproduce a dirty signal properly....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 25, 2011,
#12
Quote by Captaincranky
Your explanation of the preamp / power amp relationship is perhaps a bit ragged

The guitar supplies the input signal to the preamp. The preamp's output supplies the, (modified of not), input signal to the the power amp. The power amp powers the speakers, period.

These stages are in a combo amp, but they're integrated, so you can't mix and match a given preamp with any given power amp as you could in a rack system.

To obtain distortion from the power amp, it must be driven into what is called "clipping". That's a condition where the output expected from the power amp is more than the amplifier's ability to produce. (This is with respect to the amplifiers inability to produce the necessary voltage and current change, and dictated by the source.

IE: a 1 watt input might produce a 100 watt output, which we'll call the amp's maximum output. If you attempted to input a 2 watt signal into the same amp, you would expect 200 watts of output. This amp can't produce 200 watts, so it "clips", or actually flattens the tops of the input waveform, causing distortion.

Once upon a time people used "power soaks", to cause the amp to distort on purpose, yet maintain bearable volumes at the speakers. They're more effective with tube amps, since tube amps at clipping are richer harmonically than a clipped solid state amp. Solid state amp also have high damping factors which controls speaker movement after a signal has ceased. Tube amps have very little damping, because of the output transformer. In solid state amps, the output transistors are wired directly to the speakers. It's the reason the the impedance rating of the speaker system is so important.


Wait, so if the pre-amp controls most of the tone and the power amp really only distorts it by clipping then whats the point to choosing one power amp over another if the power amp is just for volume?

Quote by muffinman123192

Also this thread NEEDS to be stickied
Last edited by zomgguitarz1234 at Oct 25, 2011,
#13
Quote by zomgguitarz1234
Wait, so if the pre-amp controls most of the tone and the power amp really only distorts it by clipping then whats the point to choosing one power amp over another?

Also this thread NEEDS to be stickied
I actually answered that question, (sort of), in my edit. All built in effects, as well as the effects loop, are in the preamp. If the signal can be modified to your liking through effects or modeling, there really isn't a point to clipping the power amp at all. Obviously, more power will drive more cabinets.

That said, if nothing will satisfy you but actual old school over driven tube amp distortion, grab a Fender Twin, and beat the crap out of it. Although, pretty much anything with parallel push pull 6L6s will do in a pinch. A Krankenstein is probably the most deviant amp on the planet, but some guys will accept no substitute.

I assume you can buy tube rack power amp. For instrument use, this might be the way to go. I'm used to rack systems being attached to the PA, and for this purpose, solid state power amps would be the better choice. It's just too difficult to get 600+ watts from tubes, and a PA should not color the sound on its own.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 25, 2011,
#14
Quote by Captaincranky
I actually answered that question, (sort of), in my edit. All built in effects, as well as the effects loop, are in the preamp. If the signal can be modified to your liking through effects or modeling, there really isn't a point to clipping the power amp at all. Obviously, more power will drive more cabinets.

That said, if nothing will satisfy you but actual old school over driven tube amp distortion, grab a Fender Twin, and beat the crap out of it. Although, pretty much anything with parallel push pull 6L6s will do in a pinch. A Krankenstein is probably the most deviant amp on the planet, but some guys will accept no substitute.


It mainly concerns me because in my old band the majority of people who where within our genre (80s rock/thrash metal) are the type of people who are opposed of digital types of amps and stuff, but now I think that they where all elitists. In fact one of my friends is very bias against Rack systems, and says all I need is a Marshall tube head and you don't need a bunch of effects if you find one sound that works, but I have a very different writing style than he does.

HOWEVER, there might be some truth to what they say, which is why I'm digging more into this rather than just buy a Axe-FX because everyone (even Chris Broderick the guitarist of Megadeth which is one of my favorite bands) says its the best thing since sliced bread.

Although Megadeth is only my favorite band because of their early stuff, so I really don't have a reason to listen to him.

The truth might lie in which one has more 'punch', axe-fx tube replicant or over-driven tubes. I don't really care for tubes or not, I just want to have something that can go from being extremely good for various types of eerie melodic, to a extremely mean crunch with a ton of punch that brings out the aggression in thrash.
Last edited by zomgguitarz1234 at Oct 25, 2011,
#15
Quote by zomgguitarz1234
It mainly concerns me because in my old band the majority of people who where within our genre (80s rock/thrash metal) are the type of people who are opposed of digital types of amps and stuff, but now I think that they where all elitists. In fact one of my friends is very bias against Rack systems, and says all I need is a Marshall tube head and you don't need a bunch of effects if you find one sound that works, but I have a very different writing style than he does.


Vinyl records are making a comeback, and that makes very little sense to me. CD Audio has so much more dynamic range, frequency response, and so very much less noise. IMHO, buying vinyl is self defeating, overpriced elitism.

Digital modeling has come a long way. I'm guessing that one day very soon, even the best and most experienced of us won't be able to tell a digital model of a Mesa Boogie, from the real thing.

I think a "one size fits all" signature sound might get tiresome, and perhaps very quickly. That would be your personal creative choice. Although, given the constraints of live performance, it would probably be more at home on stage than in the studio.

Jimmy Page didn't use a double neck on Stairway to Heaven in the studio, but he did on stage.
#16
As for tuners. Rack tuners have a huge display you can see from the other side of the stage, they're huge. That big range of travel makes it really easy to use. Once you've used a proper rack tuner pocket or pedal tuners feel like toys.
I have mine permanently on because it doesn't hurt the tone. I can tune a string halfway through a solo.

As you can see, the meter covers most of the 19" wide unit.
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#17
Quote by Captaincranky
Vinyl records are making a comeback, and that makes very little sense to me. CD Audio has so much more dynamic range, frequency response, and so very much less noise. IMHO, buying vinyl is self defeating, overpriced elitism.

Digital modeling has come a long way. I'm guessing that one day very soon, even the best and most experienced of us won't be able to tell a digital model of a Mesa Boogie, from the real thing.

I think a "one size fits all" signature sound might get tiresome, and perhaps very quickly. That would be your personal creative choice. Although, given the constraints of live performance, it would probably be more at home on stage than in the studio.

Jimmy Page didn't use a double neck on Stairway to Heaven in the studio, but he did on stage.


I know what you mean about how the 'one size fits all' sound sucks. It's so obnoxious in thrash metal, and they re-enforce it. HOWEVER! I think there still might be some truth that Digital might not contain the same punch tubes do, but I need to research this better. I don't give a shit about if its digital and can be every amp invented by humans and well trained monkeys, nor if its got outdated tube technology.

What mainly concerns me is how it actually sounds, so I might try to see if there really is a difference between tube sound and digital tube replication sound.

Maybe its better. I don't care about the classic tube sound, I don't even know what the hell they mean by it. I just know that I want something with a lot of punch for when I play thrash, but versatile so I can play melodic stuff which isn't exactly acoustic but its not crunchy.

TL;DR: I'm going to be blunt and say I honestly don't care if its digital or tube, I just want to see if it sounds. Maybe tubes are better for thrash, I don't know yet until I find a comparison without bias.
#18
The classic thrash rack rig would be a Marshall 50:50 power amp and a Marshall JMP-1 preamp.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#19
A quality power amp can be important for many reasons. Do you get all your gain from the pre-amp? Then you want a beastly behemoth of a power amp with a ton of headroom. Do you like the sound of 6L6's being pushed into breakup? Then you want a nice tube power amp, possibly one that can be switched down to lower wattage so you can get that tone at lower than deafening volumes.

Look at a rack amp as being like a normal tube amp head, only you take the pre-amp and power amp out and put them in seperate boxes.

I use a rack setup, but only for effects, etc. My rack has a power conditioner, tuner, FX processor, compressor, PA, and space on the bottom for a couple pedals (one is always on, the other I need to sell lol)
Quote by tubetime86
He's obviously pretty young, and I'd guess he's being raised by wolves, or at least humans with the intellectual capacity and compassion of wolves.


You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
#20
Quote by Cathbard
The classic thrash rack rig would be a Marshall 50:50 power amp and a Marshall JMP-1 preamp.


Not interested in the classic rig, so much as something that I want to sound like. Going to take a ton of research to find just what I'm looking for.
#21
I don't understand what you are trying to say. You say you want an old thrash sound, well, the JMP-1 with a 50:50 is the way to get that sound.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#22
Quote by Cathbard
I don't understand what you are trying to say. You say you want an old thrash sound, well, the JMP-1 with a 50:50 is the way to get that sound.


Not exactly "old thrash". I'm aiming at something that sounds like it has a lot of power and aggression (which is basically thrash I know but I just don't want to get stuck with something that might not be specifically what i had in mind). Although i'm going off what I have seen to be the generic thrash sound which my friends achieved quite well with tube heads (Marshall and Mesa) and they one claims you don't need a rack and a bunch of effects if you have a good head. Although that just sounds generic and redundant to me.

Maybe I am really looking for a jmp-1 and 50:50, but I just want to get an idea of what's out there before I go with what is traditionally used. Also I think I've got a bias to go against the grain because my last band was so generic it made me sick.
#23
Hey Cath, is the JMP-1 a good buy? A guy is selling one around here and I believe I can get it for cheap...

Mesa Royal Atlantic
Orange Rocker 15
Marshall Class 5C
Emperor 4x12 Silver Bells
Yamaha THR10
PRS Swamp Ash Limited Custom 24
LTD Viper 500 with Duncans
#24
Quote by Captaincranky
Vinyl records are making a comeback, and that makes very little sense to me. CD Audio has so much more dynamic range, frequency response, and so very much less noise. IMHO, buying vinyl is self defeating, overpriced elitism

Hey man, records are cool. And with records you get more of an experience listening to it as opposed to ripping a CD to iTunes and then forgetting about it. Also, some release are vinyl only AND it's cool having the artwork and liner notes nice and big.
#25
Quote by Perverockstar69
Hey Cath, is the JMP-1 a good buy? A guy is selling one around here and I believe I can get it for cheap...


It's very popular.

Right now the preamps I'm looking at is the jmp-1, Ada mp-1, the axe-fx which I all over the place, and maybe the mesa triaxis. I want to broaden my list with more obscure pre amps.

Quote by phoenix_crush
Hey man, records are cool. And with records you get more of an experience listening to it as opposed to ripping a CD to iTunes and then forgetting about it. Also, some release are vinyl only AND it's cool having the artwork and liner notes nice and big.


He's nottalking about ripping. Hes talking about albums which also have artwork. As for experience: go to concerts.
Last edited by zomgguitarz1234 at Oct 25, 2011,
#26
CD Audio has so much more dynamic range, frequency response, and so very much less noise.


This may be true, but the flip side of the coin is that the trend toward increased digital compression destroys dynamics. A "digital remaster" of an old album quite frequently compresses it to the point of absurdity. So I have nothing against CD's, I have a problem with the way CD's are often produced these days.

/end-side-rant
#27
Quote by zomgguitarz1234
It's very popular.

Right now the preamps I'm looking at is the jmp-1, Ada mp-1, the axe-fx which I all over the place, and maybe the mesa triaxis. I want to broaden my list with more obscure pre amps.



What sounds can you get out of it? I've read it's clean sounds are not that great but I don't care about cleans anyway, my mesa has all the cleans I need, I'm thinking about something more like Iron Maiden or classic metal/thrash and maybe blues. How much should I pay max for a JMP-1 unit?

Mesa Royal Atlantic
Orange Rocker 15
Marshall Class 5C
Emperor 4x12 Silver Bells
Yamaha THR10
PRS Swamp Ash Limited Custom 24
LTD Viper 500 with Duncans
#28
Quote by Perverockstar69
Hey Cath, is the JMP-1 a good buy? A guy is selling one around here and I believe I can get it for cheap...

They aren't too bad at all. Big range of tones from them. Most people with them seem to like them. If you can get it cheap go for it. You can always flip it if it's not exactly what you want. You can often pick them up for decent prices these days and isn't a bad way to wet your feet into rack preamps. Check Ebay to see what they are pulling these days before you conclude that you are getting it cheap. If you can get it for less than about $300 you'd be doing pretty well. Fairly decent MIDI for such an early device.


Quote by Captaincranky
Vinyl records are making a comeback, and that makes very little sense to me. CD Audio has so much more dynamic range, frequency response, and so very much less noise. IMHO, buying vinyl is self defeating, overpriced elitism.

That may be true but that dynamic range is rarely used these days. Music is compressed so much in the ridiculous "loudness war" that the old vinyl actually has more dynamic range because it was mastered better. No point having 96dB of available dynamic range on the medium if you are limiting it to <30dB dynamic range at the source and that's what's going on with modern mastering.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at Oct 25, 2011,
#29
Quote by Perverockstar69
What sounds can you get out of it? I've read it's clean sounds are not that great but I don't care about cleans anyway, my mesa has all the cleans I need, I'm thinking about something more like Iron Maiden or classic metal/thrash and maybe blues. How much should I pay max for a JMP-1 unit?


I'm just getting into Racks myself and going off what I read, but it sounds pretty good for maiden. It's also very popular for thrash, which is slightly why I'm avoiding it because I'm trying to get away from the same generic tone.
Last edited by zomgguitarz1234 at Oct 25, 2011,
#30
That may be true but that dynamic range is rarely used these days. Music is compressed so much in the ridiculous "loudness war" that the old vinyl actually has more dynamic range because it was mastered better. No point having 96dB of available dynamic range on the medium if you are limiting it to <30dB dynamic range at the source and that's what's going on with modern mastering.


This more eloquently stated what I was driving at. +1
#31
Alright, I got something else not related to finding my dream tone regarding racks.

I heard that one rack system is intended for the whole band. Can anyone shed some light on this? What confuses me is if you apply effects to your rack do those effects work on all instruments (say two guitars use the same rack, and someone sets the rack to a reverb setting. How does that not affect both guitars).
#32
No, a guitarist's rack is for him alone. Some people will also stick PA gear or other stuff in the same rack just for convenience but the guitarist's stuff in the rack is his and his alone. Just because it's located in the same physical rack doesn't mean it's all wired together.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#33
Quote by zomgguitarz1234

I heard that one rack system is intended for the whole band.

Where did you hear this?
#34
Quote by Cathbard
No, a guitarist's rack is for him alone. Some people will also stick PA gear or other stuff in the same rack just for convenience but the guitarist's stuff in the rack is his and his alone. Just because it's located in the same physical rack doesn't mean it's all wired together.


Alright that clarifies. It really didn't sound right because that's like saying the whole band is using ONE amp.

Quote by Sputnik1
Where did you hear this?


Read it on some forum. Someone said "The rack is intended for the whole band, sometimes they'll have two racks. One for both guitarists and one for the drummer and bass" although that didn't make much sense to me.
#35
I have two racks. One for my guitar and one for my keyboards. The keyboard rack also houses the power amp for the foldback monitors. Sure, sometimes I wire the keyboards to that amp to use as a standalone system for jamming but for gigs it isn't wired together, it's just in that rack for convenience.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#36
Yeah, my PA is a rackmount Carvin. That's the only item in my rack case that's not 100% for my guitar. Did we need a 12 channel PA.... No. Is it awesome to have one that flexible and powerful anyway... Bet your ass
Quote by tubetime86
He's obviously pretty young, and I'd guess he's being raised by wolves, or at least humans with the intellectual capacity and compassion of wolves.


You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
#37
If I'm using a floyd rose bridge is there any point in getting a tuner? Considering that if you change one string they all go out of tune.
#38
Quote by zomgguitarz1234
If I'm using a floyd rose bridge is there any point in getting a tuner? Considering that if you change one string they all go out of tune.

You shouldn't have drastic change in all of your strings when tuning just one. I'm confused.
#39
If you go to drop D, then yeah it will totally screw up the bridge. If one string is a little off, bringing it in tune won't hurt you. And a tuner is always a good thing to have. Nothing will ruin a performance faster than an out of tune guitar. Especially because it's so easy to fix. There's really no excuse for it.
Quote by tubetime86
He's obviously pretty young, and I'd guess he's being raised by wolves, or at least humans with the intellectual capacity and compassion of wolves.


You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
#40
Quote by Sputnik1
You shouldn't have drastic change in all of your strings when tuning just one. I'm confused.


as talking about this:

Quote by jpatan
If you go to drop D, then yeah it will totally screw up the bridge. If one string is a little off, bringing it in tune won't hurt you. And a tuner is always a good thing to have. Nothing will ruin a performance faster than an out of tune guitar. Especially because it's so easy to fix. There's really no excuse for it.


I thought the major advantage to having a rack tuner was to be able to change tuning on stage quickly, as well as it's more accurate than a regular tuner.


edit: Also can you just buy a pre-amp and use it by itself if you plug it into another guitar amp? My bass amp has a jack for Pre-Amps I think (although it might just be for bass preamps) and my Microcube has a Aux In jack.
Last edited by zomgguitarz1234 at Oct 26, 2011,
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