#2
All wholesteps, which forms 6 notes. So if we were starting on F, we get: F, G, A, B, C#, D#.

Since it's a perfectly symmetrical scale, it kind of just floats endlessly when used by itself. Unless you're Debussy or Frank Zappa, it's most likely to be used sparingly as a transitional devise between keys.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Oct 25, 2011,
#4
What's cool about it, is that there's technically only two different whole-tone scales. As the dude above me said, it's used pretty sparingly. If you just it in a song, it'll probably only be used briefly as a transition between chords or keys. Or, you could write a piece that uses the scale exclusively, which I have tried.

I might be wrong, but I'm pretty sure the Forest Temple theme from OoT uses the whole-tone scale.
#5
Quote by Brainpolice2
All wholesteps, which forms 6 notes.


Whole Tone...... all wholesteps.... I am sooo stupid.
Thanks for the answer.


Quote by aCloudConnected
What's cool about it, is that there's technically only two different whole-tone scales.


There's only 2 whole tone scales?
I don't get it.

EDIT: Never mind, I got it. 1 would be starting on a natural note, and the 2nd would be starting on a Accidental note eh?


Thanks guys!
Last edited by MaddMann274 at Oct 25, 2011,