#2
A chord built on the fifth degree with a seventh in the second inversion, ie, the fifth on the bass... an inverted dominant chord
#3
It's figured bass, it shows (most of) the intervals that are above the bass note. 4/3 is shorthand for 6/4/3 and indicates, as mrkeka said, a second inversion 7th chord.
#4
Thanks

And why is a first inversion major chord marked with a 6?
As in V6
Quote by razorback91
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#5
Quote by 08L1V10N
Thanks

And why is a first inversion major chord marked with a 6?
As in V6

The root note is an interval of a minor 6th above the bass note.
#6
Quote by 08L1V10N
Thanks

And why is a first inversion major chord marked with a 6?
As in V6


Figured bass indicates intervals above the bass, but you only show what's necessary, so 6 is shorthand for 6/3 (the bass note, plus a third and a sixth above it, which makes a first inversion triad). You generally leave out as much as you can, so:
- root position triad is nothing (sometimes indicated with 5/3)
- first inversion 6 (6/3)
- second inversion 6/4.
And for seventh chords
- root position is 7 (7/5/3)
- first inversion 6/5 (6/5/3)
- second inversion 4/3 (6/4/3)
- third inversion is 4/2 (6/4/2).