#1
So I was contacted by a friend who was like "hey I got free access to a studio you wanna come down and do production." I responded "well I have never used Pro Tools," (knowing the studio I know they use this) "so I may not be the best help." He was like "don't worry you will pick it up."

So the conversation ended...so any tips to be able to pick it up fast? I am at a slight disadvantage cause I use FL Studio for everything now. I use to use Cubase and have quiet a bit of experience with Reaper, as well. I have used Sonar (grudginly) a few times.

I am hoping my experience with Cubase and Reaper will get me through it all okay. Any tips? I am a very fast learner when it comes to DAWs.

I would like to point out I am not sure what he means by "production" I forgot to ask...usually I do the production, mixing, and mastering on all his songs. He said something about micing up some drums, no biggy since I can do that. So I am just gonna assume we are gonna capture a bunch of sound for free lol. I believe we are doing Hip Hop as well (no biggy at all since that is simple stuff). Okay now I am done rambling...

TLDR: Will my experience in Cubase and Reaper help me adapt to Pro Tools fast? Tips? Am I just being overly nervous? Should I "graduate" from bedroom recording?
Last edited by FireHawk at Oct 25, 2011,
#2
Ur probably being a little nervous. I've always found Pro Tools easier to pick up than most DAWs and everything for the most part is self explanatory if you've got experience with other DAWs.

Take a look at some PT tutorial vids on youtube. It'll get the basics in you fast
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#3
The only real differences are the vast number of (and common usage of) key commands, as far as using the DAW are concerned,and understandingthe multi-tool, which will speed up editing a lot.

I'd say at least remember there are two windows (Arrange and Mix) and unless they use two monitors with one for each window, you will find a lot of use for the command "cmd + =" on Mac/ "ctrl + =" on PC, as it cycles between the two.

If I remember rightly, cmd + shift + I is to import audio files from elsewhere into the session onto new tracks, cmd + G brings up your group preferences and lets you assign tracks to various places. And I think cmd + E inserts a marker/spotlight comment into the position of the playhead (useful to mark different song sections, or if you notice a mistake/something you want to do later but don't wanna stop playback.

Tons more but I've forgotten 'em aha.

Oh, and most important of all - "cmd + S" to save the project (do it regularly to avoid risking loss of data if it crashes!
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#4
You'll be fine.

Apple =
Apple ] (zoom)
apple [ (zoom)
f5
f6
f7
Press these three for the multi tool.

Structure your session
individual instruments (individual channels)
individual takes (new playlists)

If shit crashes then go into folder and you'll find back up session.
#5
I just made the jump from Reaper to protools in order to work in my university's studio. I've never appreciated Reaper so much. Pro Tools just has not been nearly as intuitive for me.
#7
Quote by saint22
I just made the jump from Reaper to protools in order to work in my university's studio. I've never appreciated Reaper so much. Pro Tools just has not been nearly as intuitive for me.


You must suck at PT then because Reaper is so much more complex and harder to navigate.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#8
Quote by lockwolf
You must suck at PT then because Reaper is so much more complex and harder to navigate.



Depends on your workflow. I still haven't quite gotten a hang of PT and I've had it for quite a while. I've been using Reaper so long that I can do nearly everything in there much faster than any other DAW.

For me, Reaper is by far the easiest, less complex, DAW I've used.
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