#1
Can you guys give me some in-depth explaination of intervals?
I know only the Major 3rd and Perfect 5th. I don't know what the others are called.


Thanks,
#2
minor 2nd= half step, or 1 fret apart
major 2nd= whole step, 2 frets
minor 3rd= 3 half steps, 3 frets
major 3rd= 2 whole steps, 4 frets
perfect 4th= 5 half steps, 5 frets
augmented 4th/diminished 5th= 3 whole steps, 6 frets
perfect 5th= 7 half steps, 7 frets
minor 6th= 4 whole steps, 8 frets
major 6th= 9half steps, 9 frets
minor 7th= 5 whole steps, 10 frets
major 7th= 11 half steps, 11 frets
perfect 8th/ octave= 6 whole steps, 12 frets
#3
Sure,

minor second (m2): 1 semitone. Example: The Jaws theme
Major Second (M2): 1 tone.
minor third (m3): 1.5 tones.
Major third (M2): 2 tones.
Perfect 4th (P4): 2.5 tones. Example, Amazing Grace (the first two notes, eg A-Maze are a P4)
Tritone (or diminished 5th): 3 tones.
Perfect 5th (P5): 3.5 tones Example, Starwars theme
minor 6th (m6): 4 tones
Major 6th (M6): 4.5 tones. Example, My Bonnie
minor 7th (m7): 5 tones
Major 7th (M7): 5.5 tones
Octave or Perfect 8th (P8): 6 tones.

This page goes more in-depth: http://www.musicalintervalstutor.info/listenpg.html
And to practice recognising them: http://8notes.com/school/theory/musictheory/files/trainers/html/id90_en.html
There are heaps of apps as well, I use Music Theory by brainscape, it's really good

But if you just do a google search there are heaps of resources out there
#4
There are also these extensions:

b9: b2 + octave
9: 2 + octave
11: 4 + octave
#11: #4 + octave
b13: b6 + octave
13: 6 + octave

You don't have to phrase them an octave up, though.
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221
#6
Intervals, sonically speaking, refer to the perceived 'distance', or more literally the relative frequency difference, between two tones. Others have already listed the standard names for the intervals from unison through octave, so I will not. However, in terms of your understanding intervals musically, they more or less are the foundation for all perceived effects of harmony and melody.

Intervals can be either termed harmonic, meaning they occur contemporaneously, or melodic, meaning they are separated in some fashion by time. Intervals are referred to as being consonant and dissonant, as well as being chromatic or diatonic. Regardless of their relative attributes from these parameters, intervals are, as I have said, melody and harmony.
You might could use some double modals.
#7
Quote by MaddMann274
Can you guys give me some in-depth explaination of intervals?
I know only the Major 3rd and Perfect 5th. I don't know what the others are called.


Thanks,

The size of an interval is determined by the number of letters from (and including) the root to the destination letter. The quality of an interval is determined by the number of semitones.

A to B = major 2nd
A to Bb = minor 2nd
A to A# = augmented unison.


Diatonic intervals have a different letter name.
Chromatic intervals share a letter name.