#1
i don't want to be annoying, but I live in a place where outside information is limited...

I can play songs like Riot in the Dungeons, Far Beyond the Sun and almost I am a Viking with not too many problems, I have some, but nothing HUGE. I've never really practiced seriously exercises on a metronome and I believe I have the basic technique to shred.

My question is, what can happen if I learn to shred only through songs and not a mtronome? Many people use a metronome to increase speed. I never have. Should I? And how would it help if I can play songs like that without needing one?
#2
One thing.

You can't.

Metronome teaches you to play totally even, in a right rythm. It's a substitute for a band in yer home environment, in a way that playing with records will never be. You need to be able to play a song through an altered tempo - on half of it, three quarters, and one and a half too. That's the only way to learn to play it 120% (because only the best of us can play on stage at as much as 70% of their capabilities)
You can't accomplish that without using a metronome.

Plus, there isn't such a thing as a minor problem. If You play off-time, unclean, miss a note, it means that You screwed, and - especially on a record - You'll have to try again, and again, and again...
Nobody's interested in the fact that You 'almost nailed a solo at 270bpm, that's for sure.
Last edited by Pudel at Oct 26, 2011,
#3
To be honest, I believe that learning to play with songs at tempo - accurately, cleanly - is an accomplishment in itself and a strong indicator of progress. I won't preach the metronome creed to you, seeing as I do not chronically utilize one myself, but I'd say that it can't hurt to use one unless you get into a specific mindset which views progress as slave to the metronome.

If you learn to shred through songs, and specifically to improvise passages through songs while maintaining temporal awareness and precision, you'll better off than just shredding to a metronome because you will be simultaneously developing your aural skills and musicality. In addition, its very likely that you'll play songs with tempo changes and adjustments, often for expressive effect or due to adrenaline in a live environment. Therefore, you'll be able to function more autonomously in a musical environment (which you would be in if you were playing music, right? ^_^).

As I said, using a metronome to improve one's technical speed is not usually a hindrance or harmful in any way. However, you must avoid thinking that your progress is limited strictly to metronome practice patterns, or thinking that your progress must improve because you've used a metronome for _x_ minutes/day/week.

One specific benefit of metronome use is that you can force yourself to develop endurance and stamina for playing at certain speeds and levels of concurrent technicality. At the same time, playing any song will require at least a baseline of endurance, as well as awareness to more than just the rhythm of the song.


In summary, you aren't eternally screwed for not using a metronome, and are in fact, in my opinion, better off than metronominions due to your ability to play music to the music. Remember, though, that such an appraisal hinges on the fact that you are playing accurately, cleanly, and on-rhythm when you say that you can. (I am unable to judge that without actually listening to you play, so this is somewhat a matter of responsibility to self to be honest in your reporting of your abilities to play the mentioned songs.)
You might could use some double modals.
#4
Metronomes are not intended to increase speed, they are intended to improve the accuracy of your timing. If, when playing with a metronome, you either can't keep up or are having difficulty properly articulating each of the notes (playing clean will give you a better idea of this), you are taking things faster than you should be. If this is the case, set the metronome to a slower speed and work at that tempo until it's perfected before kicking things up another notch.

Even if you think you can play something perfectly, it's always worth taking the time with a metronome to confirm that everything is right. There's also something to be gained from playing the same passages at different tempos.
#5
Quote by AETHERA
To be honest, I believe that learning to play with songs at tempo - accurately, cleanly - is an accomplishment in itself and a strong indicator of progress. I won't preach the metronome creed to you, seeing as I do not chronically utilize one myself, but I'd say that it can't hurt to use one unless you get into a specific mindset which views progress as slave to the metronome.

If you learn to shred through songs, and specifically to improvise passages through songs while maintaining temporal awareness and precision, you'll better off than just shredding to a metronome because you will be simultaneously developing your aural skills and musicality. In addition, its very likely that you'll play songs with tempo changes and adjustments, often for expressive effect or due to adrenaline in a live environment. Therefore, you'll be able to function more autonomously in a musical environment (which you would be in if you were playing music, right? ^_^).

As I said, using a metronome to improve one's technical speed is not usually a hindrance or harmful in any way. However, you must avoid thinking that your progress is limited strictly to metronome practice patterns, or thinking that your progress must improve because you've used a metronome for _x_ minutes/day/week.

One specific benefit of metronome use is that you can force yourself to develop endurance and stamina for playing at certain speeds and levels of concurrent technicality. At the same time, playing any song will require at least a baseline of endurance, as well as awareness to more than just the rhythm of the song.


In summary, you aren't eternally screwed for not using a metronome, and are in fact, in my opinion, better off than metronominions due to your ability to play music to the music. Remember, though, that such an appraisal hinges on the fact that you are playing accurately, cleanly, and on-rhythm when you say that you can. (I am unable to judge that without actually listening to you play, so this is somewhat a matter of responsibility to self to be honest in your reporting of your abilities to play the mentioned songs.)


To be fair, I've been into shredding, learning it since September. I still have to go through sweep picking (muting), and I have to strict my alternate picking. I sometimes slip some tremolo in the middle. That's the most important thing that's left for me. Alternate picking fast & clean
#6
The problem with learning to play along to songs is that you follow the guitar part that you're playing - it makes mistakes less obvious, and also means that you're probably relying on the guitar for your timing - in a band, you can't rely on a prerecorded track to follow. If you're going to play along to songs, I recommend either finding the backing track, or getting guitar pro, downloading the tab, and muting the part you want to play.

Also - metronomes are great and you should use them, but they sound horrible and really grate after a while - personally I'd much rather use a drum machine. I use an online one called "Monkey Machine" (just Google it) and pretty much just stick with the default beat, though admittedly it's awkward if you want to change time signature (in which case I use my metronome).
#7
The metronome will also help you if you are going to want to play in a band and record a cd.

Besides the fact it helpes you play in time it also measures your speed progress.

You know were you can play effortlessly.

There is a difference between the speed you have when you are warmed up and the speed you have when you are not warmed up.

I recommend that you take my ebook: http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/the-guitar-blueprint-to-success/

And read it.

I talked about the mental process of learning, the process of memory muscle to increase your speed.

A speed building technique.

I also wrote something about the metronome, how to use in concordance to the note values.

An lots more.

Happy reading
#8
Quote by apajr
There is a difference between the speed you have when you are warmed up and the speed you have when you are not warmed up.


So true. Usually takes me half an hour minimum, sometimes an hour to properly warm up. In fact one of the most important things to remember about learning guitar:

When you pick up the guitar, don't expect to play as well as you did last night.
#9
Quote by apajr
The metronome will also help you if you are going to want to play in a band and record a cd.

Besides the fact it helpes you play in time it also measures your speed progress.

You know were you can play effortlessly.

There is a difference between the speed you have when you are warmed up and the speed you have when you are not warmed up.

I recommend that you take my ebook: http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/the-guitar-blueprint-to-success/

And read it.

I talked about the mental process of learning, the process of memory muscle to increase your speed.

A speed building technique.

I also wrote something about the metronome, how to use in concordance to the note values.

An lots more.

Happy reading



I don't understand why playing along with Guitar Pro or the songs themselves won't help you achieve speed. After all, you play patterns on songs/metronomes at different speeds. Or what If I created my own patterns and played them without a metronome until I achieved a speed of my own?
#10
Quote by YYMMalmsteen
I don't understand why playing along with Guitar Pro or the songs themselves won't help you achieve speed. After all, you play patterns on songs/metronomes at different speeds. Or what If I created my own patterns and played them without a metronome until I achieved a speed of my own?


It will help you to achieve speed to a degree - obviously you'll see benefit to it, but the fact that the part you're playing is already being played masks any mistakes you might make. Basically - sure, you'll see benefit to it, of course - you're practicing the song, but it would be far more beneficial to play along to something that doesn't include the part you're playing. It'll help with your timing and also your articulation because the only guitar you'll hear is yourself.

As I said - backing tracks are good, or playing along to guitar pro (provided you mute the part you're playing in Guitar Pro), or just a drum machine or metronome.

Quite an interesting backing track to play along to is the intro of "Master of puppets", because the only instrument in the intro is usually just the guitar so obviously on the backing track there's the initial count in, then nothing until the drums kick in every so often. It's quite a good test of how well you can keep time WITHOUT a metronome as it'll sound absolutely awful if the guitar doesn't match when the drums come in. However it's more important to first be able to play in time with a metronome, drumkit, backing track, band etc. because you won't often get situations where you're playing without a beat.
Last edited by llBlackenedll at Oct 27, 2011,