#1
There was a groupon online for music lessons, me never having taken lessons decided it was worth it as it was $29 for 4 lessons vs 17.50/hr, i went in now knowing what to expect.

The teacher says my playing is WAY up here (i think he is just trying to make me feel better, i really suck bad) but my theory and reading is WAAAAAAAAAY down here... so he handed me a book "elementary rudiments of music."

This book is making me realize exactly how retarded I am, i am barely through the first chapter and have already hit my first wall...

Anybody else use this book and can possibly help me out?


i am stuck on an exercise that's asking me to differentiate between a diatonic semitone, a chromatic or a whole tone. There are diagrams to show me what the differences might be but I am pretty much stumped on this.
#2
First time posting in this section? You will find a wealth of knowledge here in this forum. I am going to follow this thread. Keep asking questions and then when people answer I will learn something too


Chromatic= is the 13 notes pitch for pitch from one note for example C to the next octave c (12 DIFFERENT notes)
Semitone=semitone is the same as a "half step" its the diffrence from A to A# or from a white key on the piano to a black key. or with guitar one fret to the next on the same string.
Diatonic= Greek for though the tone. basicly it means that it goes from C to C (or any octave) scales are classified as "diatonic" if they consist of 7 notes (8 including the octave). Each note in a diatonic scale must be represented. In example C,D,E,F,G,A,B,C is a diatonic scale (major scale in the key of c)

i have a intermediate understanding of theory i am no expert so make sure someone confirms this. also people will prob add some information to it.
Blues, classical, metal. Who says you cant love all 3?
Last edited by ThatDarnDavid at Oct 26, 2011,
#3
A diatonic semitone is a half step either up or down, to the next letter in the alphabet. So from G up to Ab or down to a F#.
A chromatic semitone is a half step either up or down, but notated with the same letter. So from G up to G# or down to Gb
A whole tone consists of two half steps, so from a G up to an A or down to an F.

In practical terms, a Ab and a G# sound the same, just like F# and Gb do. Why notate it differently then, you might ask. Well, the way you notate it depends on the context, and is something you might/will delve deeper in when you get further in to theory. For now, it's important that you know the difference between the two.

Also, theory is very hard in the beginning, just like any subject is, so you don't have to worry if you feel like a 'retard'. If you have an instructor and you have a problem, you could always ask him/her too. After all, you pay for his/her musical guidance, and nothing beats face to face interaction. (Of course you can always ask questions on this forum, though )
Last edited by Keth at Oct 26, 2011,
#4
also it may seem daunting at first with all the different terms. just keep reading different threads on this forum try your best to understand what they are saying and dont freak out if you dont. just repetitively reading about stuff and eventually though figuring out the context you will learn how to use the terms themselves.

also never be afraid to ask questions. the guys on this forum are NOT like the guys in the pit and you dont have to be afraid of someone making you feel stupid. I ask a question at least once a week just remain humble
Blues, classical, metal. Who says you cant love all 3?
Last edited by ThatDarnDavid at Oct 26, 2011,
#5
That just sounds terrible and why I insist that theory taught traditionally in books sucks so bad. The best thing you could do with that is burn it and forget it. And I make a living teaching this stuff to guitar players all over the world.

Wow, I cant believe that anyone would ever buy a book anymore.

I have a theory,

For every 100 that buy a theory book, 3 might learn something. So, if a book is 10 dollars, the author gets 1000.00 and succeeds in teaching 3, so in terms of usefulness he's sold 3 books at 333.00 each.

Talk about a royal scam.

Sean
#6
I find that if people possess a certain level of maturity, they will benefit from a book - taking things slow, reading carefully and not continuing to another section before they fully understand what they have just learnt.
#7
I like books... But ive never used that one.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#8
I actually have that book and used it to brush up on rudiments before going into first year music and it's quite a good book if you want to learn conservatory style theory. I'm not exactly sure why people are saying that it's not a good book based upon the fact that he doesn't understand something from it. (Well, Sean's just being Sean, but still...)

At any rate, there are two types of semitones: chromatic and diatonic. When a semitone contains two notes with the same letter name, it's called a chromatic semitone, and when it contains two notes with different letter names, it's called a diatonic semitone. It's a bit of an artificial distinction perhaps, but there you go.
/obligatory relevance
#9
Quote by Sean0913
That just sounds terrible and why I insist that theory taught traditionally in books sucks so bad. The best thing you could do with that is burn it and forget it. And I make a living teaching this stuff to guitar players all over the world.

Wow, I cant believe that anyone would ever buy a book anymore.

I have a theory,

For every 100 that buy a theory book, 3 might learn something. So, if a book is 10 dollars, the author gets 1000.00 and succeeds in teaching 3, so in terms of usefulness he's sold 3 books at 333.00 each.

Talk about a royal scam.

Sean


i pay 15 for a half hour lesson, once a week. 20 weeks is 300, five months, less than half a year of tuition and it cost the same as a book that will never be wrong or make me listen to his band, that i can keep for future reference? i'll take a book. that said, best of both worlds quite obviously the best way to go (university)
#10
Quote by gavk
best of both worlds quite obviously the best way to go (university)


This