#1
I've been playing guitar for a short while and I know want to learn about scales (the theory behind them and everything) When looking on the internet for lessons I find lots of sites teaching scales like this.
http://www.guitarfriendly.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/a-major-guitar-scale-third-position.jpg
So I've been learning from that, but then I see this. http://www.12bar.de/gif/scale_a.gif
and I have no idea what Im looking at of course I can see where the part of the scale I is but I don't understand any of the other notes. So could any one point me in the right direction to a lesson on this or explain it to me.

Thanks.
#2
In my honest opinion, if you are being self taught, you're going to find it a tough time. I'd suggest getting a teacher. That diagram is one of the most worthless that you could have found, simply because it isnt going to help you at all at this stage.

This is what you can look forward to as you self study. I think it's great that you want to understand theory and so on. This path that you are taking is going to leave you more confused. If you can't get a teacher, and that's not an option. I'd suggest musictheory.net and work through the lessons one by one. Are they very good? Not really, but its about the best you will find for free.

If you are ever interested and can afford a private teacher, we do teach this kind of thing (theory and fretboard navigation applied to the guitar), and you're welcome to contact us here, and I'd be happy to get you a course catalog.

Also, one last free resource, would be to check of Mike Dodge's free lessons website. He knows his stuff.

Good luck man. Respect for trying to learn, but these diagrams aren't really going to get you there.

Best,

Sean
#3
I can't really afford a teacher at the moment. I understand It will be tough, but Im really serious about this and In not going to give up I bet you hear that all the time :P I could buy some books on music theory do you think they could help? and if they do could you link me to some you would recommend?

Edit: @Sean0913 I've seen your rock and blues academy lessons in your signature. Is this a good alternative to a teacher. Because im extremely interested in learning from it if it will help me.
Last edited by Doctor hercules at Oct 27, 2011,
#4
A good sight to get you started is htp://www.musictheory.net Be sure to go through each lesson thoroughly and to understand each one before going on to the next one.

Books do help. One I've looked at is Music Theory for Dummies and it seems pretty good. I've heard good stuff about the Berklee Method books. There are also books for applying this to guitar, but I haven't much experience with those.

I will echo Sean09103's message of the value of a teacher. I'm self taught, but I know it would have a hell of a lot easier if I had a guide helping me out, pointing me in the right directions and answering questions I may have. Being self taught means you will come across incorrect information, sometimes learn the wrong way and get into stuff you're not ready for. It's definitely possible, but you really have to stick with it, be vigilant and willing to relearn things in case you've got them wrong.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#5
Quote by Doctor hercules
I can't really afford a teacher at the moment. I understand It will be tough, but Im really serious about this and In not going to give up I bet you hear that all the time :P I could buy some books on music theory do you think they could help? and if they do could you link me to some you would recommend?



I don't know of any good theory books on the entire planet, and I teach this stuff for a living. I think Mike Dodge and myself, are the only two people here in this forum that makes their living entirely from teaching this for a living (I think axemanchris does also), but if you could afford to buy some books, you could afford some lessons that would get you pretty far. Not everything is expensive.

For example the first thing I teach, is the notes on the neck. It's for a practical reason. How would you ever apply what you'll learn in theory, to the guitar, if you cant even identify the notes on the strings (in 2 seconds or less)? Make sense?

Honestly, if you have no money, concentrate on those two websites that I suggested, and if those don't work, Id consider saving your money for lessons, because if that stuff was out there being taught correctly for free, you'd have heard about it by now. The only other thing I'd suggest is becoming a regular here and maybe in the course of a couple of years through reading threads, you'll start to accumulate a better grasp of theory.

By the way I also mentor for free, just contact me through my profile and Ill do my best to help.

@DrHercules - I just read your updated edit and your question about the Academy. I can't say for sure if what we do would be a perfect fit for you (or anyone). While we do specialize in this stuff, for now, just consider this as a "possible" option. We've had great success with our students around the world, but truthfully, none of that means anything, because I dont know enough about YOUR situation.

As people know by now, I do a lot of questioning and learning about a potential student before I just take them on with us. I'd suggest that the first thing you might want to do (because it never hurts to at least look into something) is contact me in my profile, and I'll do my best to help. I'll get you a catalog, answer your questions honestly, and do my own evaluation of your needs and current skill sets, before I make a recommendation, one way or the other.

By now most people know I don't just admit people, but there's an extensive behind the scenes process, but that's part of why it works. And you can be assured, that I won't be wasting your time, or playing with your dreams and hopes.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Oct 27, 2011,
#6
Still have to disagree with you on the theory book thing Sean, although they do work best when you can work through them with a teacher.
#8
Quote by Jesse Clarkson
Still have to disagree with you on the theory book thing Sean, although they do work best when you can work through them with a teacher.


Jesse, you know that the amount of times that you and I will ever disagree on things, is going to be rarer than Haley's Comet. I respect you, and have long considered you a solid, knowledgeable contributor to this forum.

And I understand that people are going to feel differently. But, personally, I've yet to find a book that does a good job at teaching anything. Relaying facts, is not the same as teaching. Teaching anticipates the needs of the student, identifies those roadblocks proactively, and prioritizes the success of the student.

Here's a great example. If a book were to instruct someone how to send 1000 dollars to the publisher, do you think they'd go into the history of the postage stamp, the different forms of paper used for envelopes and the flow of the mail system?

Hell no.

It would be really simple. They'd have written instructions, a pictorial diagram, and probably a self addressed stamped envelope. Why? Because if they screw up, there's not going to be 1000 dollars coming their way. They have a VESTED interest in the student "learning" to send them 1000.00, and they are going to make good and sure that the student learns.

Well, that's what I mean. To make good and sure that the student learns, is a priority of a teacher. Conveying theory facts, in a book is not "teaching" anything, in my opinion. That's why I agree with your point about using a teacher, Id say a book might make a good supplement, at best, but no book does a good job of "teaching".

When I teach, the student will learn.

I've never in my life had an instance, where I've taught this, where the student did not learn.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Oct 27, 2011,
#9
a book can present you theory in a step by step way.
the two diagrams present a big leap. one is in one position and i believe the other covers about 12 frets.
book wise i recommend the popular theory grade books from the rgt.
if you type in "popular music theory rgt into google" you should find a link for them.
you can sit a grade exam which is a good goal and bench mark for your progress.
#10
Quote by Doctor hercules
So I've been learning from that, but then I see this. http://www.12bar.de/gif/scale_a.gif


Well, this image is part of a free Blues tutorial. If you start from the beginning, you will understand what these dots mean and how to use them.

(This is only one of a zillions ways to learn, a good teacher or a good book might also work. Some players need a teacher, some learn by book, some by video, some by just listening. Understanding some theory isn't bad at all.)