#1
How do you do it? Because I must be doing something wrong.

I rest the waist of the guitar on my right leg. I rest my right hand on the bass bout of the guitar. My back is as straight as can be, with the natural S curve. Yet, when I play my movement is restricted, and it's really hard to bring up my pinky for the A-string and E-string.

If I raise my right leg by supporting it with a couple of books, then I can play anything no problem. But I hate doing this because: 1. I don't want to be restricted to only playing well when a stack of books are around, and 2. You get sore really fast after playing like this for a while.

So what am I doing wrong? Am I just too tall or something? I'm 5'11''-- but I'm pretty sure that doesn't have anything to do with it. Although it seems like if I were shorter I would have a much easier time playing since my body would be in the right proportions the have optimal fret board movement.
#2
it all what your used too...

i started on "non-classical" position and i have the most reach and versatility in that position. i can play in classical position....i cant keep the guitar up. worst part is i love V's but i just cant play em. i end up pointing the guitar 90 degrees up haha.

standing up im not so bad but i cant nail some of those stretches that i can sitting down.

im 5'11 i got not problem with it.
Quote by kangaxxter
The only real answer to the SG vs Les Paul debate is to get a Flying V and laugh at all the suckers who don't have one.


Quote by Blompcube

if you embrace inaccurate intonation it can be quite arousing.


I <3 TWEED
#3
Could be the height of the chair, how you're resting your guitar on your leg, saying on your right leg doesn't tell me much. I would definitely need pictures to be able to tell you.


Also, just because someone sits in the classical position doesn't mean they have perfect posture. Most people do it wrong anyways. Sitting in the regular side-saddle position is perfectly fine (although reaching the higher positions on classical guitar is much more difficult) as long as you do it well and aren't making any bad compensations in your body for bad posture.
#4
All of the stuff you mentioned is useful, but theres more important points you're missing -

1) Both left and right wrist should be fairly straight
2) Your hands should not be supporting the weight of the guitar at all
3) Fingers should be roughly parallel with frets and evenly spread, thumb behind the neck roughly opposite the middle and ring finger

I would guess that 1 and 3 are where you're having problems.
#5
Quote by Freepower

2) Your hands should not be supporting the weight of the guitar at all


this is the problem i have IN classical position lol
Quote by kangaxxter
The only real answer to the SG vs Les Paul debate is to get a Flying V and laugh at all the suckers who don't have one.


Quote by Blompcube

if you embrace inaccurate intonation it can be quite arousing.


I <3 TWEED
#6
Freepower, I will PM you a video of my posture.

I will also upload a video to this thread as well.
#7
Posture is hard to correct online, tbh. I'll give it a go, but don't expect a magic bullet. I would need to be there in person and poke you and prod you and move the guitar around.
#9
Hey, that vid clears it up nicely. It is points 1 and 3 that are giving you bother.

ie -
1) Both left and right wrist should be fairly straight
3) Fingers should be roughly parallel with frets and evenly spread, thumb behind the neck roughly opposite the middle and ring finger


The root problem is that your guitar is too close to you, and too low. You're slouching because you know you want to have your wrist below the guitar in order to spread the fingers out - but that makes your wrist horribly crooked. You can solve this by tilting the neck up a fair bit and away a little - this gives you room to get under the neck and keep your wrist fairly straight.

Another really good thing to do is simply to raise the guitar - stick your right foot on an amp or footstool or anything that'll bring the guitar up a few inches. This again just basically lets your wrist get in a good position and will naturally let your fingers straighten out.

You'll be in good company - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDRuxYt6Ga0&feature=related

(he uses in ear monitors, those only exist for his right foot during hard stuff! 2:40 )

(oh, 5:40 is a sterling example again - see how much reach he gets in the same area of the neck by having the guitar much higher than you? )
#10
YESS I LOVE THAT WHOLE BUDOKAN LIVE DVD. IT'S SO AWESOME.

And yes, I knew that raising my right knee would help...but is there another way? I just hate having always being restrained by this; I want to just sit down and play.
#11
Sure, tilt the neck up and out a bit more, that'll help a lot from your current position. To be honest, if you want to play at the 12th fret low E and stretch it's just gonna be hard no matter what.

I sit with my right leg crossed over my left, not very manly but it does mean no props and enough reach and stretch for me.

I also keep some good company in that regard - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcYh4KxYF2g

This might be relevant to you if you hate crossing your legs, same area of the neck, different angle of the guitar neck - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khs0Wl7Hvas (bear in mind paul has massive hands and that's pretty tricky for normal people )
#12
I read a tutorial on UG a few years ago that gave pretty good reasons to sit with the guitar on your left leg. I tried it and never look back. Playing on my right leg feels so unnatural now, especially given how far back it pushes my right shoulder.

The great thing about it is that when you stand up, the guitar is in exactly the same position. I actually find it easier now to play standing (until my feet get tired :P)

It's a bit backwards that classical players generally sit, but they play in a position that's perfect for standing, and rock players do the opposite.