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#161
hey, boysie, how do you do your initial fretboard slotting? I know you radius and recut with the depth guard but the first cut, do you use a mitre or just a very careful cut?

and da_: http://www.ajdesigner.com/phpcircle/circle_normal_diameter_d.php :p you can work it out :p I might make one myself so I'll do up a little diagram later though if your geometry isn't up to scratch
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#162

2c is the distance between the tops of the two fixed wheels and is set at 4 inches, h is the distance from that line to the edge of the third wheel

[B]Radius   h[/B]
7.5"     1.70mm
9.5"     1.34mm
10"      1.27mm
12"      1.06mm
14"      0.91mm
16"      0.79mm
17"      0.75mm
18"      0.71mm
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
Last edited by GABarrie at Feb 6, 2012,
#163
Here you go
http://projectguitar.ibforums.com/index.php?showtopic=14027


Quote by GABarrie
hey, boysie, how do you do your initial fretboard slotting? I know you radius and recut with the depth guard but the first cut, do you use a mitre or just a very careful cut?

Some people get pre-cut boards, but most/everyone cuts the slots first, then radius' the board. If you do it right, you won't have to re-cut them.
Just call me Julius, J, etc.
Taking an Internet break for a while, will come on when I can.
Last edited by nowa90 at Feb 6, 2012,
#165
Quote by nowa90
Some people get pre-cut boards, but most/everyone cuts the slots first, then radius' the board. If you do it right, you won't have to re-cut them.

that helps me not at all.... I was asking about doing the initial slotting and getting it straight
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#166
barrie, if you have a carpenters triangle and make sure the blank is square you should be able to get all the fret slots marked out and straight?
#167
oh, well then people use a mitre saw or just a rule/square
Just call me Julius, J, etc.
Taking an Internet break for a while, will come on when I can.
#168
Gordon: I used a really coarse mitre box which was way too loose for the fretting saw. I just pressed up hard against one side to keep it square.

JCG: It's got a bit of plastic swarf hanging on, but that'll come away pretty quickly with use. And I'm dodging the side dots for this one, since I barely use them normally - it's just another thing that could go wrong.

Nowa: I did a shallow cut first to mark the position while I had a square edge to work from, then a second depth cut once I had radiused the board. That way you don't get a hollow under the fret in the centre of the board, which (apparently) can reverberate a bit. I could have also radiused, slotted then cut the taper, but since I was hand sanding the radius I figured the more material I could remove before sanding the better
#169
cheers, carpenter's triangle it is then, got a few of those >.< my mitre box is a bit loose too, only really use it for small jobs, that's what the chop saw is for >.<
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#170
Quote by JCGGUITARS
looking good!
1) are you keeping the fingerboard that way (it looks a tad messy but that could be me)


damn thats rough coming from this guy hahah.

although I did notice the corners of the binding need filling with glue, you can see where they join. . . (its at the body end of FB)
#171
I like the Fret Bender, will build mine this WE.

BTW, I want you to know that i like your fretboard. Its not messy at all.
#175
Quote by Boysie8
Nowa: I did a shallow cut first to mark the position while I had a square edge to work from, then a second depth cut once I had radiused the board. That way you don't get a hollow under the fret in the centre of the board, which (apparently) can reverberate a bit. I could have also radiused, slotted then cut the taper, but since I was hand sanding the radius I figured the more material I could remove before sanding the better

I cut my slots to depth after radiusing as well. Although a wee tip is that you can always spread some glue into the slot before hammering your frets. It'll fill any excess space in the slot
#176
Wow, you are amazing dude. I assume you learned from a lot of experience and trial and error?
Last edited by Tmusician at Feb 13, 2012,
#177
whoomit: great minds aye? I used a dab of epoxy just to make sure the frets stayed where I put them, which should serve the same purpose.

Tmusician: cheers man. No experience of my own, just a whole lot of research and even more patience.

Anyways, update time. After spending a lot of time and money at the start of the build putting together a frame to let the router follow the top curve of the guitar, I found that the binding bit couldn't get close enough for the inner binding cut (hopefully the picture will explain a little better). So I ended up using the router bit to mark the depth, then took the material out with the craft knife. Turns out I overestimated the strength of the spalt (again), and pulled this chunk out with little more than a brush with the router bit:



Not much I could do about that, so after cutting the channel I got the inner binding glued up:





Followed by the thicker outer binding:



I routed a 3mm strip of maple down to ~1mm, then stained it black and glued and cut it on the headstock:



And got a bit of pre-wiring done while I waited for that to dry. Note to self: the metal end of the soldering iron is warmer than the plastic end, and should not be used as a handle.



I've spent the last couple of months thinking about what to set in the headstock (it's an important decision) and settled on the Kotuku, or White Heron. Here's the design after a quick cut with the craft knife:



Then with a bit of graphite in the knife groove to darken the lines:

#178
Rough cut (slowly) with a hacksaw:



Then shaped with a needle file and emery board:



I did the same marking trick with the headstock negative:



By this stage I was in need of some more specialist tooling, so out with an old steel-shear guillotine blade:



Which turned into this:



Which produced this:



And consequently this:



Next up the leg, which was surprisingly easy for such a delicate part. MoP is stronger than it looks.

#179
I've got a few other minor bits and pieces done over the last couple of weeks as well. I started grain filling:



And the fretboard is setting as I type. First step, at HotRod's instruction, was to put a dab of silicone at either end of the truss rod channel, where the double nuts sit:



Then spreading the glue, using a piece of masking tape to keep it away from the channel:



And finally clamping it all up:



One final thing, while the fretboard was drying, was to restain the headstock veneer. It shows up a little where the epoxy flooded out and soaked in, but it's just something I'll have to live with I guess.

#181
you could maybe put epoxy on the whole veneer to even it out?
Just call me Julius, J, etc.
Taking an Internet break for a while, will come on when I can.
#182
Dude, this is such a cool build. The heron for the headstock inlay is a really original idea.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#185
Quite the critic aren't we, JCG? The answer is yes - you may have noticed a binding-shaped step around the headstock.

I've got a big patch of progress with no photos unfortunately - I've been pretty preoccupied with job-hunting lately, so have been getting guitar work in when I can - but I have been making progress. I also had a fairly major set back with a misbehaving power drill, which meant I spent an extra week filling and redrilling the holes, but it all worked out in the end.

Holes drilled (the second time):



Taped off for finishing:



Then the first coat of varnish, cut 50% with turps to get it soaking into the soft spots:





I have to say I'm pretty bloody stoked with the colour and finish. It'll take a while to get an adequate coat on (I'm using a brush, so will cut the varnish to reduce brush-marks), but I'm pretty confident it'll work out alright.
#186
Glad to see you back! Great stuff as always
________________________________________

Chur
#191
Nice les paul! The only thing I would have done differentm is the heel, but whatever, its your build. Congrats!
#193
Hey, what do you think of Kauri?

That's an awesome LP and I'm considering building one after I graduate next year.
#194
Cheers guys. n1ckn1ce: I know a lot of people get pissed off with traditional LP heels, but I've never had an issue with them - figured I'd stay with the tried and true.

DeadF18: good to see another Kiwi here - we're taking over the forum! Kauri is a beautiful wood, but (like Rimu) it's becoming harder and harder to get. I'm guessing you're at Auckland Uni - what're you studying?
#195
I have heard of one or two guitars made out of Kauri, but I think it would probably suit a bass guitar better since its heavy and rock-hard.


I'm actually at Lincoln Uni - Majoring in 'Energy, Transport and Environment' Minor in 'Spatial Planning'.
#196
Looks great!




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#198
So I've been pretty busy over the last week or two. First of all I got the body all varnished up, then promptly sanded through it while trying to polish it up. After a second take, sanding to 1200- then polishing down to 12000-grit, I got this finish on the top:



After that, I got the fretboard all taped up for dressing:



Then levelled the frets using a bit of 1"x1" extruded aluminium with 220-grit sandpaper, using sharpie to show when the frets were level:



Crowned the frets with my shiny new file:



Then slapped on some lemon oil for good measure:



After a bit of soldering, drilling and pressing (no photos sorry, I was in the zone), I'm pretty stoked with the finished product:



It's still awaiting a proper setup, but it already sounds pretty bloody good.