#1
So i wondered about all pepole who play fast, or want to become a fast guitarist; how high you have your string action? Saying this in mm etc, would be kinda meaningless because it changes for every guitar.

So pesonaly i want to learn to play fast, but not become a "shredder" (like Rusty Cooley for example, i love his playing, but thats just not who i wanna be). I have my action so i get a little buzz (since i pick too hard). Do you think this is okay? It kinda works as a handicap to be more relaxed, whit my picking. I suck at legato with high action, i want to become a hybrid between legato and alternate. I use 10 gauge strings.I kinda like that clanckyness you get, and the notes also dont fret out with bends.

I have tried other pepoles guitars, some have very low action, so you almost only hear buzz if you are unplugged, but sounds good whith some gain. I wonder how professional guitarists have their action.

So how do you look at this? Do you have a high with no buzz, or a low with buzz, but is really easy to play? Or something in between? How is your view at this?
#2
For me it's barely high enough to never buzz.
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#5
Buzz depends a lot on the relief of your neck, not just how low the action is. You can have an insanely low action without buzz. Personally I like a medium-high action on my main guitar, and then the one I do lots of legato on has a low action. You can play really fast on any action, just develop your skills and finger strength.
#6
My action actually goes about 3 inches below the fretboard, where I literally finger inside the neck without the terrible buzz that comes with using the fingerboard.
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#7
Quote by Freepower
Buzz depends a lot on the relief of your neck, not just how low the action is. You can have an insanely low action without buzz. Personally I like a medium-high action on my main guitar, and then the one I do lots of legato on has a low action. You can play really fast on any action, just develop your skills and finger strength.

So relief means that the the headstock bows forward? Is alot of relief good for non- buzzing?
#9
Just slightly less than 1mm on the higher strings. I use really light strings on an extended scale though and I have a rather light touch so I get barely any buzz. Any buzz I do get is inaudible when amplified unless I thrash the hell out of the strings, which is never.

As said, your guitar's neck has a lot to do with buzz. Mine is set up almost perfectly, so I don't get any buzz anywhere. I used to get a bit of buzz on the lowest frets though with higher action... but then I adjusted the truss rod just a tiny bit, and it eliminated the buzz and allowed me to put the action a bit lower. This took a few months of experimenting with different string tensions and everything, though... it took a lot of sweat and blood to set it up right.
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221
#10
It's not overly low or overly high. While low action increases speed, high action lends itself to more emotive vibrato and bends.

My instrument needs to be set up pretty badly, though.
#12
Quote by Usernames sucks
So relief means that the the headstock bows forward? Is alot of relief good for non- buzzing?



Not always but you're looking for around 0.15 mm of a gap for the relief, most guitars get fret buzz to an extent depending on the player and guitar. I tend to get buzz but I'm fairly heavy on the pick. The ibanez instruction book that came with one of my previous guitars reckons 2mm for the low E string between the bottom of the string and the top of the fret on the 12th fret and about 1.6 on the high E. You've also got a bit of pull from the magnets in the pickups, string gauge, string condition etc. As long as it doesn't come through the amp it's fine though.
Last edited by Twidler at Oct 30, 2011,
#13
Quote by Freepower
Buzz depends a lot on the relief of your neck, not just how low the action is. You can have an insanely low action without buzz. Personally I like a medium-high action on my main guitar, and then the one I do lots of legato on has a low action. You can play really fast on any action, just develop your skills and finger strength.


Yup this is the right answer .

As for finger strength you should try out these exercises guys

http://www.guitarlearningtips.org/guitar-technique/guitar-finger-exercises/
#14
Quote by Twidler
You've also got a bit of pull from the magnets in the pickups
really? i didnt know that i learn somthing new every day
#15
It depends on what pickups you're using, too. My EMGs, for example, use weak magnets and a preamp to boost the signal. When fretting the 24th fret, my high strings are barely a hair's breadth away from touching the pickups. No pull at all.
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221
#16
For me the important thing is that it's not so low that you get dead notes. As soon as you hear a dead note on a bend, raise the action. Mine's quite low, but I don't like it ridiculously low as the bridge on my Ibanez is so close to the body that picking with a low action becomes difficult.
#17
I play on low action, just enough so that the strings don't buzz or the intonation gets screwed up. For me, about 1.5mm space between the strings and the frets would be more than enough.
#18
Fairly low action, thicker strings.

To be fair, if you look at my strings you would see a "downhill". My low E is quite high (Maybe even 3 - 4mm on 12th fret), A significantly lower (no more than 2.5mm) and so on.

I like my action not higher than 2 mm on 12th fret on "shred" strings. I rarely shred on 5th and 6th strings unless its a part of the sweep/
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